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Opposite of "Surgite?"

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    Opposite of "Surgite?"

    We tell our students (all two of them) to "Surgite" when we begin Latin class. I'd also like to be able to tell them in Latin to take their seats. Can someone help? . . .something that means "Be seated" or "Please be seated."

    Thanks for your help!
    CarolHS

    #2
    Latin commands

    To tell them to be seated, say, "Sedete."
    My students love to play "Simon says" when they've finished their work. I say, "Simon dicit...." with one of the following commands:
    Surgite...rise
    Sedete...sit
    Dormite...sleep
    Ambulate...walk
    State...stand
    Pugnate...fight (just pantomime, no hitting anyone!)
    Orate...pray (fold hands)
    Vertite...turn
    Audite...listen (hand on ear)
    Videte...see (shield eyes with hand)
    Cantate...sing

    Have fun,
    Julia

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks!

      Thanks, Julia, for the answer and the extras!
      CarolHS

      Comment


        #4
        Julia- Thanks for the idea!

        We had such fun with Simon Dicit on a rainy Friday afternoon....
        Thanks for the great idea. Do you mind if I post a link to this idea on the Yahoo Latin Classical Ed board ?



        Nanci

        Comment


          #5
          What a great game Magistra6!

          Thank you for sharing!
          Leigh Lowe

          Comment


            #6
            Nanci

            Go ahead and post a link. The more kids we can get to enjoy Latin, the better!
            Julia

            Comment


              #7
              Question about "Simon dicit"

              I love this idea! I have a question. On the dvd for LC1 the way the students are told to pray is "Oremus" and I'm wondering how that differs from "orate"?
              I'm new to this-thanks again for this great idea!
              Kelly

              Originally posted by magistra6
              To tell them to be seated, say, "Sedete."
              My students love to play "Simon says" when they've finished their work. I say, "Simon dicit...." with one of the following commands:
              Surgite...rise
              Sedete...sit
              Dormite...sleep
              Ambulate...walk
              State...stand
              Pugnate...fight (just pantomime, no hitting anyone!)
              Orate...pray (fold hands)
              Vertite...turn
              Audite...listen (hand on ear)
              Videte...see (shield eyes with hand)
              Cantate...sing

              Have fun,
              Julia

              Comment


                #8
                Oops one more question about Simon Dicit

                The list below says "surgite" ... rise. How does surgite differ from "state"
                Thanks again,
                Kelly
                Originally posted by magistra6
                To tell them to be seated, say, "Sedete."
                My students love to play "Simon says" when they've finished their work. I say, "Simon dicit...." with one of the following commands:
                Surgite...rise
                Sedete...sit
                Dormite...sleep
                Ambulate...walk
                State...stand
                Pugnate...fight (just pantomime, no hitting anyone!)
                Orate...pray (fold hands)
                Vertite...turn
                Audite...listen (hand on ear)
                Videte...see (shield eyes with hand)
                Cantate...sing

                Have fun,
                Julia

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by ktan
                  The list below says "surgite" ... rise. How does surgite differ from "state"
                  Thanks again,
                  Kelly
                  As I understand it, 'surgite' has the sense of "stand up" (the movement towards standing, rise), whereas 'state' has the sense of "stand" in one place, no movement.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    oremus and orate

                    "Orate" is the imperative plural, third person, and is the command, "pray," addressed to more than one person.
                    "Oremus" means "Let us pray." It is the subjunctive, first person plural.

                    Comment

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