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3rd Grade Read Aloud List

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    #16
    2 additional cents

    I would not be at all opposed to Memoria Press suggesting additional read alouds for interested parents. K-2nd Grade students can easily listen to Wind in the Willows, The Little House books, etc. MP doesn't have to do this though. Parents could just choose to read those books to their children on their own.

    My own homeschool program draws from multiple sources and reading lists.

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      #17
      Nobody's list is going to please everybody! That's why there are so many different lists. Aren't we fortunate to have access to so many good books and book lists to choose from?

      For my part, looking ahead to the third grade list for our next school year, yes, we've read some of those books already too. But I'm looking forward to reading them aloud again, and I love the idea that they will be scheduled into the lesson plans to make sure I do it. Good books deserve multiple readings. It's not a race to "get through" as many books as possible before they hit high school. Let's slow down and really savor the good ones.

      Julie
      Julie

      2016-2017:

      DD 19 -- homeschool graduate attending community college
      DS 17 -- 12th grade using variety + MPOA Chemistry
      DD 12 -- MP 7A

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        #18
        classical?

        I would expect a "classical" primary and grammar level education to include a higher percentage of literature written prior to the last fifty years, even at the Kindergarten level. I am not dismissing these picture books, although I fail to see how Ox-Cart Man is timeless or classical. Two of the read-alouds for the 2nd grade level are reworked Aesop's Fables. Why not just read Aesop's Fables?
        DD 23 College grad, married, employed.
        DS 20 Autistic, beautiful, unemployable.
        DS 17 HS grad. Twelve years of MP. Hopes to be a chess-playing priest.
        DS 15 Teaching me to give up the reins. Does MP work when not in ballet classes, at rehearsals, stretching or playing chess.
        DD 13 Nine years of MP. Chess player, marksman, WSJ fan.
        DS 11 Six years of MP. Chess player, ballet dancer, archer.
        DD 8 Four years of MP. Chess player, occasional dancer. Actually gets to write in the Student Guides.

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          #19
          Wow, sorry! I didn't mean to start a little firestorm over the preK-1st Read Aloud lists.

          I guess my point was that since PARENTS are reading to the children, I had expected beautiful picture books of classic fairy tales, fables, Beatrix Potter, Children's mythology (not D'Aularies). I own some of the William Bennet "Children's Book of X" (America, Faith, Virtues, Heros) and I love the high interest pictures and morally uplifting stories. Here's a few more: Raggety Ann, Babar, Aesop. Now, THOSE are timeless classics in my book (all of the above).

          I have to say that I have kids ranging from 18 yrs (in an Ivy League college) down to my current preK'er. I am totally OK with some "modern classics" mixed in with the above, but I wish there were *more* of the above since they are parent read alouds.

          I can use other literature lists for my preK'er and it seems like I will. I purchased the PreK Read Aloud package from MP, but find the selections to be mediocre. Looking ahead to K and 1st, I am feeling the same way now.

          I highly recommend MP products and will continue to do so (!). I just feel like I'll need to find other sources for "classical" early elementary literature.
          DS, 26 yrs, graduated from MIT (Aerospace), recently completed the design and execution of unhackable military software... in his spare time.

          DS, 24 yrs, graduated from SIU's School of Business, ENGAGED!

          DD, 21 yrs, Senior in Education at The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC

          DS, 12 yrs, currently attending a classical school which would give HLS a run for its money.

          All homeschooled.

          Me: retired after 16 years of continuous homeschooling. Ahhh....

          Comment


            #20
            Good Discussion

            I think that this is a good discussion.

            I think that we all agree that there are great books, classic literature, that we want our children to eventually read: books by Homer, Shakespeare, Chaucer, etc. We have this important common ground.

            The question is what do we want our 5, 6, 7 year olds to be reading. I believe that there are many good books available to them. These books are not great classics, but they serve as an introduction to the true, the beautiful, and the good.

            Babar, Raggedy Ann, the Little House books, Wind in the Willows, Winnie the Pooh, Beatrix Potter's books, etc all came out of the early decades of the 20th century. Both at the time and now they were considered good books for children. But there were other books written during those same years that were considered just as good and in some cases even better. If we accept Laura Ingalls Wilder's Newbery Honor book These Happy Golden Years as a solid book for children, why can't we also accept the Caldecott award winning book The Little House by Virginia Lee Burton which was published a year earlier. If we accept The Little House, why can't we accept Burton's other books, Mike Mulligan and the Steam Shovel and Katy and the Big Snow, which are both on the Memoria Press reading lists. I would argue that the literary merit of The Little House and Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel is much higher than that of Ragedy Ann and Babar, even though those are fun books. The personication that Virginia Lee Burton uses in her picture books is quite powerful.

            What is the cutoff date for good books?

            If we accept popular books from the 30s and 40s and 50s such as Babar and Raggedy Ann, I don't see why we can't accept the most esteemed books from the 30s and 40s and 50s as well... The Big Snow (1948), The Egg Tree (1950), A Tree is Nice (1956), etc. I also think it would be a shame to throw out Snowflake Bentley just because it happened to be written in 1998.

            Books of Aesop's fables, William Bennett's Book of Virtues, etc should have their place on our bookshelves. These are good compilations of material for young minds. But there is also a place for beautifully illustrated versions of a single Aesop fable or a single great American poem. Illustrations capture the imagination of children too. They are all re-tellings. Some re-tellings include just text and others put artwork with the text. Why limit ourself to large volumes without illustrations?

            I wholeheartedly agree that Ox Cart Man is not in the same league as The Republic.... but that doesn't mean that it doesn't have value. I could write a long article on the text in Ox Cart Man. There is a lot of depth behind it. The sentence structure itself has a lot of meaning. (I would not write an article on the the text of Raggedy Ann or Babar or Curious George because there is not that level of depth.)

            The task of deciding which books we should read to our young children is one of the most important tasks of our lives, and there are many different opinions on what to read and many different reading lists. The most important thing is that we are reading to them. It is wonderful that we are all preparing our children to read the classics.
            Last edited by Lizzy; 02-19-2012, 11:24 PM.

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              #21
              fewer picture books

              Actually, many of the books on the K-2 read-aloud lists are books that I read to my children, although at the preschool level. All of my children have begun to read independently by the time they were 5 and re-read those books for themselves or might have overheard them being read to younger siblings. But for read-aloud time that pertains to schoolwork, I choose books that are not picture books (although they may contain illustrations) to challenge them.
              I found this great quote at one of the Charlotte Mason websites that pretty much sums up how I personally approach choosing what to read to my children.
              "Children should be discouraged from developing a taste for easy books that will undermine their capacity to read classics later. Books should be selected with the goal of decreasing dependence on pictures, and relying more on the imagination to envision pictures in the mind from the text."
              And while this may open up a whole new discussion about aesthetics, let me just say that Miss Spider's Tea Party (on the first grade reading list) is not, in my opinion, a great book. It is not even a particularly good book. It is not timeless. It is not a classic. I do read the board book version to toddlers as a counting book.
              I think the original point raised by Jen is that we would like to see more classical read-aloud selections for the Pre-K-2 grades. Since those are not available, we will not purchase the supplemental read-alouds offered. I think this is valuable customer feedback for a company that is offering materials for a classical education. I would want to know if customers were not buying the materials offered due to expense or for another reason.
              DD 23 College grad, married, employed.
              DS 20 Autistic, beautiful, unemployable.
              DS 17 HS grad. Twelve years of MP. Hopes to be a chess-playing priest.
              DS 15 Teaching me to give up the reins. Does MP work when not in ballet classes, at rehearsals, stretching or playing chess.
              DD 13 Nine years of MP. Chess player, marksman, WSJ fan.
              DS 11 Six years of MP. Chess player, ballet dancer, archer.
              DD 8 Four years of MP. Chess player, occasional dancer. Actually gets to write in the Student Guides.

              Comment


                #22
                Scope and Sequence

                I hope that you don't mind that I am continuing this discussion, but I find it very interesting.

                I too am reading many of the K-2 supplemental books at the preschool level. My two year old's favorite books are Ox Cart Man and A Tree is Nice. They have been her favorite books since she was one. We haven't started chapter books yet. We will probably start those when she is 3.

                I must confess that I will be using many of the Memoria Press materials ahead of the age for which Memoria Press schedules them. Their Kindergarten program works better as a Pre-K program for me.

                However, for some parents that will not be the case, and there is nothing wrong with that.

                I would make a guess that it is specifically because you read many of the books on the MP lists to your children at a younger age, that they are able to appreciate more challenging books now.

                I would guess that some children have never heard these books before, and Memoria Press is just making sure that they have at least been exposed to them a little before moving onto more challenging books.

                Charlotte Mason's comment could be the starting point for a great debate, but I will agree that there is a point at which we want our children to appreciate a great work of literature unaided by pictures. (At the same time, I want my children to both read the story of Robin Hood unaided by pictures and also be exposed to N.C. Wyeth's illustrations as well.)

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                  #23
                  SaintJude7, I can see we are on the exact same page. I won't be purchasing the K or 1st grade READ ALOUD packages because they are, well, boring. We are also long-time Sonlight users and my bookshelves are full-unto-overflowing with "modern classics" (Robert McCloskey, Seuss, etc). The SL Pre 4/5 or Core A (formerly K) package can give me nearly every book that Lizzie mentioned. I own those already.

                  But, I bought those packages years ago before I was "full speed ahead classical". Even Susan Wise Bauer makes the point that she read a child's version of Homer to her kids *and they weren't too young to get the story line* at age 5yrs. Cannot we have more of those type of "story books"? After all, *the parents are doing the reading*.

                  I am a fully satisfied MP customer and have been for nearly 10 years (OMG, has it really been that long?!). I truly was just trying to give feedback to Tanya about the supplemental READ ALOUD packages. Whereas I was thrilled to see the new 3rd grade list, the preK-2nd leaves me a little cold and I doubt I will be buying them. My alternate sources are pretty much the same as SaintJude7's: Kolbe, Angelicum, Ambleside... with my SL books tossed in for interest.
                  DS, 26 yrs, graduated from MIT (Aerospace), recently completed the design and execution of unhackable military software... in his spare time.

                  DS, 24 yrs, graduated from SIU's School of Business, ENGAGED!

                  DD, 21 yrs, Senior in Education at The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC

                  DS, 12 yrs, currently attending a classical school which would give HLS a run for its money.

                  All homeschooled.

                  Me: retired after 16 years of continuous homeschooling. Ahhh....

                  Comment


                    #24
                    I like using the Five in a Row booklists for younger kids. I have not bought any book packages because we have excellent libraries here. I have found, for me, it is hard to remember which books I read to my older ones to read to my younger ones now. That is where the MP and other lists help me.
                    The Homeschool Grads:
                    J- 6/96
                    S- 11/98

                    Still Homeschooling:
                    G- 4/04
                    D- 5/05
                    F- 7/08 (my only girl)

                    Future Homeschooler:
                    M- 9/16

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                      #25
                      3rd grade read aloud ETA

                      I'm curious when the 3rd grade read aloud package will be available. We're trying to figure out when we are going to put in our K and 3rd orders, but I'd like to put in our order all at once. Thanks!

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                        #26
                        Also, will the lesson plans come with a schedule for the supplemental readings?

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                          #27
                          We should have the 3rd grade read aloud set ready by the end of April. And yes, the read aloud books will be integrated into the full lesson plans as we have done in K-2. It ends up being one read aloud book per week and we have tried to coordinate the books with the other subjects they are studying.

                          Paul
                          Paul Schaeffer
                          --
                          Academy Director
                          Memoria Press Online Academy

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