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    3rd Grade Read Aloud List

    Hi. Could someone tell me if there is a read aloud list for the third grade curriculum? A link would be great. Thanks.

    #2
    Hello.

    I'm attaching the read-aloud list as it stands now. We are having to tweak it again because we took The Magician's Nephew out due to popular demand on this forum! We are now entering Narnia through the Wardrobe in 4th grade. Mr. Cothran is thrilled that so many came out in support of his opinion!

    Cheers,

    Tanya
    Attached Files

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      #3
      Hi Tanya,
      Does that mean in the 3rd grade there will be a "read-aloud" set to purchase in addition to the curriculum package? I just glanced at the 3rd grade curriculum and didn't see it...is the curriculum being expanded? I'm sorry if I'm missing the obvious answer to this question.

      Blair
      Blair

      Mom to 6 sweet girls and finally a boy!
      SB - 9 - starting MP 5M
      A - 7 - starting MP 3rd
      M - 5 - starting MP 1st
      F & SG - 4 year old identical twinners
      CJ - a rascally, busy 2 year old
      GH - 4/17/2017, much adored, baby brother!

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        #4
        Hi, Blair.

        We are going to add a 3rd grade read-aloud set for purchase, and we will be adding the list to the 3rd grade curriculum guide with a plan for reading these as they tie into the curriculum each week.

        Regards,

        Tanya

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          #5
          3rd grade guide

          Hi Tanya,

          Can you tell me how much of the guide is being reworked right now? Is it just the read aloud section? I was wanting to get a look at the guide but I wonder if I should hold on a bit. Is the read aloud section kind of separate from the curriculum where I can just get the revised list later?

          Thanks,
          Heather

          Comment


            #6
            Heather,

            Actually, this guide was revised this summer by one of our 3rd grade teachers, so it is in great shape. We just need to add a row to the bottom for the read-alouds once that schedule is established. That's the only change I foresee for 3rd grade.

            Regards,

            Tanya

            Comment


              #7
              You'll be changing the third grade lesson plans to include the MP grammar book for third grade too, right? The beta version I have has Rod and Staff English 3 still.

              Julie
              Julie

              2016-2017:

              DD 19 -- homeschool graduate attending community college
              DS 17 -- 12th grade using variety + MPOA Chemistry
              DD 12 -- MP 7A

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                #8
                Julie,

                That's been done. You need a new guide. Email me with your address, and I'll send you one next week.

                Cheers,

                Tanya

                Comment


                  #9
                  Tanya,

                  Thank you! But I don't need it until this summer, so I'll wait to see if the final version comes out before requesting a replacement.

                  I do have one more question, though: This version lists the Poetry book as a supplement, but then doesn't mention it in the daily lesson plans, at least that I can see from skimming. Will the final version include poetry lessons from the Poetry book in the daily breakdown of lessons too?

                  Thanks!

                  Julie
                  Julie

                  2016-2017:

                  DD 19 -- homeschool graduate attending community college
                  DS 17 -- 12th grade using variety + MPOA Chemistry
                  DD 12 -- MP 7A

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Actually, the poetry book is directly tied to the lit. guides, so most of the work is done within literature. If there is a poem a teacher wants to study in another class, that will be mentioned in the curriculum guide. But mostly, you will pick the poetry lessons up as you go through the lit. guides.

                    Tanya

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                      #11
                      Tanya, that 3rd grade reading list is a-m-a-z-i-n-g. Love it. It's classical and substantial.

                      Can I add that although the 3rd grade list impresses me, the PreK, K, and 1st actually do not. The 2nd grade list is "OK".

                      I would love to see a more "classical" feel in the lowest grades in the Read Aloud list: fairy tales, legends, classics. I don't recognize many of the books (and I am a bibliophile), not good. Since parents are reading *to* the kids, I feel that the lists could be tweaked to include more of the above.

                      Just my honest opinion, of course.
                      DS, 26 yrs, graduated from MIT (Aerospace), recently completed the design and execution of unhackable military software... in his spare time.

                      DS, 24 yrs, graduated from SIU's School of Business, ENGAGED!

                      DD, 21 yrs, Senior in Education at The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC

                      DS, 12 yrs, currently attending a classical school which would give HLS a run for its money.

                      All homeschooled.

                      Me: retired after 16 years of continuous homeschooling. Ahhh....

                      Comment


                        #12
                        The Read Aloud Lists

                        I check these forums every day, and I read every post. I rarely comment, but today I feel compelled to do so.

                        I would like to say that I definitely think that the read aloud lists for K-2 are very good. They contain many works of 20th century children's literature. These works, such as Ox Cart Man, posess a timeless truth and beauty. They might appear to be simple, but there is great depth to them.

                        John Senior pointed out that only a mind enriched by 1000 good books will be able to really appreciate the "Great Books." The books selected by Memoria Press for read alouds will definitely enrich young minds. There are fairy tales on the lists as well as beautifully illustrated biographies. Many of the books have outstanding illustrations. Many of the books won the Caldecott Medal.

                        I myself grew up on these books. I can personally attest to the fact that they are a great preparation for classical studies. While there are many excellent books besides these that every young child should be exposed to, Memoria Press has done a great job at creating their lists. As a homeschooling parent, an elementary school teacher/librarian, and a student of the classics (Great Books + Greek), I want to thank Memoria Press for the time they put into creating these lists. Keep up the good work.

                        If anyone has not read these books, I highly encourage that person to do so. One of the greatest contributions of the 20th century to world literature is it's development of the children's picture book, a unique literary art form.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          also disappointed

                          I have to back up Jen on this one. I decided to use the Memoria Press curricula for three of my children this year. (With baby number seven coming in a couple of months, I knew I would lose a lot of my lesson planning time.) We had been following the Latin-Centered Curriculum plan, which I still feel is the ideal classical education. I can definitely see how reading truly classical literature beginning in Kindergarten prepared my oldest for the Great Books she is reading now in her second year of high school. I decided to place my boys (7 &9) in second and fourth grade to give each of them a year to really focus on improving their spelling and handwriting. Unfortunately they have already read all of the books used in Memoria Press' literature guides for Kindergarten through Sixth Grade and are out of sync with the history layout as well. I gave the Kindergarten read-alouds a try with my five-year-old for the first seven weeks. They were cute picture books with lovely illustrations, but not what I would call timeless literature or classical. They were pretty much what the public schools in our area use. At the same time we were reading aloud from Winnie the Pooh and Aesop's Fables, which I feel are a better use of our time. At Kindergarten level all of my children have been ready for chapter books and fewer illustrations for read-aloud time. I also don't plan to use the second-grade read-aloud selections, as my son has read most of the books on his own already. For his read-aloud time I am using "Black Ships Before Troy." He has already completed D'Aulaire's Greek and Norse Myths, so this is a perfect follow-up.
                          I'll stick with Memoria Press for ease of use and thorough Latin studies, but the read-aloud selections for the primary and grammar levels are not as challenging as LCC, Mother of Divine Grace, Mater Amabilis, Angelicum Academy, and Kolbe Academy.
                          DD 23 College grad, married, employed.
                          DS 20 Autistic, beautiful, unemployable.
                          DS 17 HS grad. Twelve years of MP. Hopes to be a chess-playing priest.
                          DS 15 Teaching me to give up the reins. Does MP work when not in ballet classes, at rehearsals, stretching or playing chess.
                          DD 13 Nine years of MP. Chess player, marksman, WSJ fan.
                          DS 11 Six years of MP. Chess player, ballet dancer, archer.
                          DD 8 Four years of MP. Chess player, occasional dancer. Actually gets to write in the Student Guides.

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                            #14
                            Confused

                            I'm confused as to what is wrong with the reading lists that Memoria Press has put together. They use exactly the same books as Kolbe, Angelicum, LCC, etc. I could probably go through the titles one by one and find them on the lists used by other classical curriculum programs.

                            For example, Millions of Cats and Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel are both on Kolbe's Lists.

                            LCC recommends D'Aulaire's biographies. Memoria Press includes these.

                            LCC also recommends selecting titles from the book Books to Build On which includes many other books that Memoria Press recommends.

                            Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening is generally considered to be an excellent poem.

                            If you want to teach similes and metaphors, Owl Moon is a great book. It is not bad just because public schools also hopefully use it.

                            Parents should read to their children whatever they want to read to them. If a parent only wants to read Homer to a 5 year old, that's fine. Homer can be exciting for a 5 year old if presented correctly.

                            However, 5 year olds are little kids. In previous centuries they would still be in the arms of their nurses and not have started to study the classics at all. I believe that 5 year olds are capable of far more than they were given credit for in classical times, but still they need to have fun. Picture books are fun, and I applaud Memoria Press, along with Kolbe, WTM, etc, for including books that are beautiful and fun.
                            Last edited by Lizzy; 02-19-2012, 04:11 PM.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Children's Literature

                              Please don't group all children's picture books into one category and dismiss them. There were plenty of playwrights in Shakespeare's day. There were playwrights who wrote literature and playwrights who wrote what was base, common, and popular.

                              There are picture book authors who write what is base, common, and popular, and there are picture book authors who write children's literature. True children's literature is not just for children. If you are an adult who has not read Ox Cart Man or Island Boy, please sit down and take the time to do so. You may learn something about the meaning of life and virtue.

                              I believe that Memoria Press should have someone write an article on the value of "good books" for one of their upcoming issues.

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