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    Confused about classical languages

    Hi, Tanya. I am planning to start Latin with my daughter this year and go through Prima Latina and at least half of LC 1. We are planning to put her in Challenge with CC eventually and I read that they are supposed to be ready for Henle 1 in 7th grade so I'm trying to get her through the Fourth form in the next four years. I'm trying to figure out how much time we should devote to Latin each day. How much time should we plan for Latin study?

    I'm also interested in doing Greek and eventually Hebrew with my children and I'm not sure when I should start. What level of Latin should they have completed before adding these? Is Memoria Press planning to add Hebrew at any point? I heard Greek is on the horizon. Is there any update with this?


    Thanks for your help.

    Shaina

    #2
    Hi, Shaina.

    The Forms lessons can be completed in 3-4 hrs. a week. Prima and LCI won't take more than 3 hrs. a week. Even if you don't make it through Fourth Form by 7th grade, if you get close, your daughter will be totally ready for work in Henle.

    We don't have plans to add Hebrew at this point, but who knows? We tend to be over-achievers. For Greek, we do it in 7th-8th grades after our students have had Latin for several years. We do have a new alphabet program that we are going to use with our 5th-6th graders so that when they get to the grammar, they will be comfortable with the letters and some vocabulary. You may want to do this too.

    Cheers,

    Tanya

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      #3
      Greek and Preschool

      If you have it done before Fall 2012 or 13 I will definitely do the Greek with her.....There seems to be almost no Hebrew resources out there so I don't even know what we would use, but maybe someone will create one before she gets to high school. Is Greek easier to learn? Is that why most Classical schools only have it for 2 or 3 years?

      Shaina

      P.S. I'm so excited that you are creating a preschool curriculum. Do you have an eta for that? I have a 3 year old I'd love to use it with.

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        #4
        Hello.

        Greek is not easier to learn than Latin. But Greek is easier for students who have a Latin background. Latin just does such a good job of teaching English grammar, and it is a language that uses our alphabet, so students have an easier time with it. In the long run, it is the better language to continue all through the school years. You can start Latin so early with students who are still mastering their own native language. But it would be nice for students to get enough Greek that they could make use of it by translating a couple of books in high school. We may get there one day!

        I'm hoping to have the completed pre-K program by mid-Sept.

        Regards,

        Tanya

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          #5
          Preschool Sneak Peek

          Tanya,

          Are you able to share any details about the PreK program?

          Also, if you are changing the readers for the K program is it the blue and red books you are changing or the Soft and White type books? Or were you talking about the read alouds? Just curious....

          Shaina

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            #6
            Shaina,

            The pre-school program is intended for 2 days/week (1/2 days). We will have an alphabet book, a numbers book, and a read-aloud book for literature. The day will begin with a devotion and prayer, a recitation, and show-and-tell. There will be calendar time, a craft or other activity, music, poetry, game time, and literature lesson. We have chosen a read-aloud book for each week's literature lesson, and give the teacher detailed teaching guidelines for each book - vocabulary, questions to ask students, picture review, etc.

            This is a course where the read-aloud book that is specific to each week is going to be important. In our other read-alouds for K-2nd, you could switch out the book and it wouldn't matter, but for preschool, in order to use the literature lessons in the curriculum guide, you would need to have the same book we have used.

            For kindergarten, we are only changing the order of the read-aloud books (The Important Book was too hard for the first week), and we are replacing The Night Before Christmas with Mr. Willoughby's Christmas Tree, George Washington's Breakfast (too hard for K) with Drummer Hoff, and Green Eggs and Ham (too easy for K) with The Cat in the Hat. Green Eggs will be in preschool. Those are the only changes, and they really aren't necessary. We are making them per our teachers' requests.

            Cheers,

            Tanya

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