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Vocabulary on literature quizzes

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    Vocabulary on literature quizzes

    I’ve been meaning to ask this for awhile but never remember when I’m on the forum. 🙈 How do folks handle the transition from word banks to no word banks on the literature quizzes, particularly with the crossword puzzles for Robin Hood. How did you teach the study skills to be prepared for the quizzes and tests?
    Heidi

    For 2021-22
    dd- 6th
    ds- 3rd
    dd- 1st
    ds- adding smiles and distractions

    #2
    We're in Robin Hood as well. I made flashcards for my student over the summer with the vocab word on the front (in neat print), and she fills in the definition on the back. Then, she uses the definitions side to quiz herself for the vocab word (kind of like English to Latin word study where you have to memorize the Latin word, not pull it from a word bank). It has worked pretty well. Sometimes, if there's a difficult spelling, we will do a sort of word study on the vocab terms. I will ask, "Which ones have double consonants? What letters spell /ee/ after C?" My student reviews these flashcards nightly leading up to the bi-monthly quizzes. It doesn't even take 60 seconds.
    Mama of 2, teacher of 3

    SY 21/22
    5A w/ SFL & CC Narrative class
    MP1

    Completed MPK, MP1 Math & Enrichment, MP2, 3A, 4A
    SC B, SC C, SC1 (Phonics/Math), SC2's Writing Book 1

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      #3
      The day before the quiz, I tell them to study the vocab from the chapters that will be quizzed. Then I orally review by reading the definition as written on the quiz and asking them to supply the vocab word. We repeat a couple of times until it seems firmly established. If it was a bit shaky, I might do another oral review the day of the quiz.
      Amy

      DS 13 MP8
      DD 11 MP6
      DS 9 MP4
      DD 6 MP1
      DS 4 R&S Pre-k books
      DS 1

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        #4
        How do you teach study skills? Ahahahahahahhaahahahahaha.

        I have found that walking into my child's room and assigning a couple of stacks of flashcards takes up less time than lecturing my child for a half hour come quiz day about systems we do not have in place (but should). Ergo, I assign. I think next year we may start trying the planner method, but it takes a good year or more to develop a habit of looking in it for assignments. I am very blessed to not have a sneaky or rebellious child who would disobey after being assigned flashcards, but I know lots of mamas who have to sit with their kids or track progress on Quizlet. I also know that my child would probably look at "FC" in a planner and skip it because it doesn't have the same weight as Mom.
        Mama of 2, teacher of 3

        SY 21/22
        5A w/ SFL & CC Narrative class
        MP1

        Completed MPK, MP1 Math & Enrichment, MP2, 3A, 4A
        SC B, SC C, SC1 (Phonics/Math), SC2's Writing Book 1

        Comment


          #5
          enbateau
          Senior Member
          enbateau She will start making her own flash cards today. Thank you for the suggestion! I knew there was probably a simple solution but couldn’t think of a thing. (I’ll blame the fussy baby who wouldn’t nap or be put down.)

          As to study skills, you’re probably right that I would be better off implementing the study skills and letting her pick up on which work well for her rather than explaining all the options and lecturing about the importance of good study habits. Since literature is her strength, it was easy to pay less attention to it. Door in the Wall showed that we needed to give it a little more time than we had in the past.
          Heidi

          For 2021-22
          dd- 6th
          ds- 3rd
          dd- 1st
          ds- adding smiles and distractions

          Comment

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