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Extra reads for a nine-year-old?

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  • smithamykat
    replied
    Originally posted by Katie19 View Post
    Hi there!

    I am encountering the same problem but with my 7.5 year old boy. Every suggestion I get for him is captain underpants or something else totally inappropriate. It gets exhausting looking! There was one series I found that someone recommended - secrets of the hidden scrolls. It’s a series where a group of kids go back in time to big events that happen in the Bible. I also found Christianbook.com to have some good recommendations as well- but I’d still check for plot and themes. Hope this helps!
    I have a 9 year old boy and was also going to recommend the Magic Treehouse series. Other books he has recently enjoyed: The Mouse and the Motorcycle by Beverly Cleary, plus the sequels, Ralph S. Mouse and something else I forget, Encyclopedia Brown, Guinness Book of World Records (kid version), Wings of Fire novels and graphic novels, and Bill Peet picture books (there is quite a lot of text in these!)

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  • Mom2mthj
    replied
    Originally posted by Katie19 View Post
    Hi there!

    I am encountering the same problem but with my 7.5 year old boy. Every suggestion I get for him is captain underpants or something else totally inappropriate. It gets exhausting looking! There was one series I found that someone recommended - secrets of the hidden scrolls. It’s a series where a group of kids go back in time to big events that happen in the Bible. I also found Christianbook.com to have some good recommendations as well- but I’d still check for plot and themes. Hope this helps!
    One thing my 8yo boy loves are Peanuts anthologies. He will read these over and over. He also likes the Stink (younger brother of Judy Moody who is seven) series and Magic Tree House and Mammoth Academy. Just a few thoughts.

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  • Erica Mentele
    replied
    My children all enjoy the Will Wilder series by Raymond Arroyo. They are hoping a new book comes out soon.

    Leave a comment:


  • Katie19
    replied
    Hi there!

    I am encountering the same problem but with my 7.5 year old boy. Every suggestion I get for him is captain underpants or something else totally inappropriate. It gets exhausting looking! There was one series I found that someone recommended - secrets of the hidden scrolls. It’s a series where a group of kids go back in time to big events that happen in the Bible. I also found Christianbook.com to have some good recommendations as well- but I’d still check for plot and themes. Hope this helps!

    Leave a comment:


  • Jessica Louise
    replied
    Concerning genera, she likes all of them: fantasy, mystery, and historical fiction. Even sci fi, if carefully vetted, is enjoyed.

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  • Jessica Louise
    replied
    Thank you all so much! There is a lot here, so I am going to start going through each suggestion in order. Thank you, again!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Mom2mthj
    replied
    I am guessing we have all felt your pain. Martin’s list is super comprehensive and especially helpful for older kids. My son is eight and while he can read very well, he still likes stuff that is easy because it is more topic appropriate. All that to say, don’t necessarily ignore some younger books. One place to start are sequels to the books in the read aloud list for the core. Currently we are reading the first sequel to the Saturdays in 3A. That series has four books total. Mary Poppins is somewhere around 10 books I think, but I don’t know if they are all in print. My son is also liking the Happy Hollister series we discovered at the used book store. That series isn’t hard, but he likes it and there are many in there. Gooney Bird Greene is funny and there are maybe five books in that series. My daughter liked the American Girl historical books at that age. The first Paddington is in 3rd, but there are 12 more books. Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle also. The Sonlight catalog is a great resource as well especially for newer books. Sometimes they can be a bit heart wrenching, but if you stick to the age appropriate cores and their summer reading lists, I haven’t found them objectionable.

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  • smithamykat
    replied
    My oldest daughter is 11 and I let her read some modern fantasy stuff that I consider fluff, but here are some things she has read that we both approve of (I am focusing on series, since you sound like you need more quantity to keep her occupied): Dear America series, Royal Diaries series, I Survived series, Green Ember series, Arabian Nights (maybe some mature themes), every Andrew Lang "color" fairy tale book, Lord of the Rings, Gone-Away Lake and sequel. We also have a struggle with what's on the library shelves. If she likes graphic novels and comics, I like Tintin (by Hergè) and Asterix. You even get some Latin references in those :-)

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  • enbateau
    replied
    Homeschooling will definitely change your priorities. I had probably purchased ten books in my life outside of university requirements. We got everything from our library, but my antennae weren't up. After reading the apologetic behind MP's approach to literature, I realized how lackluster our library was and moved whole categories of budget into our book fund. After five years, we've collected over a thousand books, many of which cost 10 to 50 cents. I keep entire lists of books I'd like to own in my purse at all times. My Wednesday routine used to be to hit DAV Thrift, Goodwill, and a local hospital thrift store all in one day. We also cashed in books we no longer read at Half-Price Books and a local mom-n-pop used book shop to buy better titles. Now, if I find a pristine copy that my kids really treasure for 50 cents to a dollar, I will pass on our gently used copies to friends so they can build their libraries. So many of our book purchase deals were answers to prayer. Be creative, be in prayer, and be picky.

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  • MarmeeLaura
    replied
    Has she read the "Betsy-Tacy" series by Maud Hart Lovelace? That's my go-to for a suggestion for a girl in the 8-12 age bracket; we gave an anthology of the first four novels to one our daughters when she was eight and they are among her most very favorite novels! The only issue I have is one chapter where Betsy and her friends encounter a oujia board (it is a product of its era), but besides that they are wonderful, sweet books that encourage virtue and character.

    We love our local librarians, but not so much the choices that whoever is doing the buying are making. We're very forthright about our objections and tend to rely on interlibrary loan for most of our selections.

    For what it's worth -- I used to worry about the amount of money we spend on books until I calculated what it would cost if our family went to a first-run film (even at a matinee, without treats). I don't worry about it now but just fold it into our educational budget.

    Laura H.

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  • Beorn
    replied
    Originally posted by Jweishaar View Post
    I don’t have book suggestions since my kids are younger, but now that I have two kids who can read we don’t go to the library anymore. There are way too many junk books and truly objectionable material. Right before COVID shut things down they had a sign at the front of the children’s/teen section advertising a talk about *** for children 12+ that parents were not allowed to attend. That sealed the deal for me. This is in small town Ohio in a catholic university town. My husband and I decided investing in our own library was worth the expense to us. The added bonus is that all the books available are chosen by us
    Great point....and sad to hear it. And agreed, Jweishaar. We limit our in person visits and mostly just get books picked up at curbside pickup to avoid situations like that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jweishaar
    replied
    I don’t have book suggestions since my kids are younger, but now that I have two kids who can read we don’t go to the library anymore. There are way too many junk books and truly objectionable material. Right before COVID shut things down they had a sign at the front of the children’s/teen section advertising a talk about *** for children 12+ that parents were not allowed to attend. That sealed the deal for me. This is in small town Ohio in a catholic university town. My husband and I decided investing in our own library was worth the expense to us. The added bonus is that all the books available are chosen by us

    Leave a comment:


  • HoosierHomeschool
    replied
    What genre of books does she like the most? Fantasy, mystery, historical fiction? Does she mind books that have stressful or intense situations?

    Leave a comment:


  • enbateau
    replied
    Check out the thread that just came up for a first/second grade reading level. It had Martin's Book List, the HLS list and more. We have had to buy most of our books.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jessica Louise
    started a topic Extra reads for a nine-year-old?

    Extra reads for a nine-year-old?

    I am coming up short on reading material for my kiddo. I have many of those lovely books that are lists of books, but I keep coming up short. Her reading level is somewhere between 5th-7th (depending on how bad the dyslexia and eye strain are that day). However, she is in that tricky place where she isn't emotionally ready for some of the material written for that age group. I took her to the library a few times, because we were spending so much money on books. Now she has found some graphic novels for kid that she likes to read, but they aren't worth the ink it took to print them. She asks to listen to audio books by Jane Austen and Louisa May Alcott, but now she wants to read this rubbish that the library stocks in her free time, instead of the classics that she used to love. I let that take its course, but now she has been through everything the library has...a time or three. What she hasn't read yet is totally inappropriate! I wouldn't read it. It kind of shook me up today seeing what they have on the library shelves for kids . So maybe it isn't so bad that she has read everything that they have that is decent. I don't know where to go from here. I know I have asked for help before, but last time you guys had fantastic suggestions! I am really struggling to come up with decent reading material. What do you do? Any more great ideas?
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