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Book of Birds Lesson Plan vs Curriculum Manual

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    Book of Birds Lesson Plan vs Curriculum Manual

    Hello! I am looking over the 6th grade curriculum manual and I am also looking at the lesson plans for The Book of Birds. In the manual, one day a week is given for science. In the lesson plans, 2 days are listed. It looks like the same amount of material, just that the lesson plans break it into 2 days. Could any homeschool mom's chime in on how they used Book of Birds? Was it possible to devote only 1 day to science? To be honest, I have similar questions on how much time to expect for FM of the Middle Ages. We are new to MP and I am trying to nail down what our weeks might look like. 🙂Thank you all!
    2021-2022 will be our 9th year of home schooling.
    *D 13, 8th grade
    *S 11, 6th grade
    *D 9, 4th grade
    *D 7, 2nd grade
    *S 5, K

    #2
    I think of classical studies (Famous Men), geography/modern history, science, and Christian studies as the "afternoon classes". Since I have multiple kids, this is what I did to simplify scheduling them:

    M and T: classical studies
    W: geography/modern history
    Th: science
    F: Christian studies

    Those subjects probably got an hour or so on each afternoon listed above. If there was a test or quiz scheduled, I would plan some extra review time into the day and then have them take the quiz/test the following day before beginning that day's usual subject. For example, if there was a science quiz, they would do the scheduled lesson on Thursday and study for the quiz, then on Friday I would give the science quiz before beginning Christian studies. So to answer your question, we did accomplish the assigned science work in 1 day or sometimes 2. If your kids need more review than that, you could include a quick recitation/review from ALL subjects in the afternoon.

    Another idea (we have similar aged kids): to shorten up Fridays and also spread our Bible study throughout the week, I would read aloud each kid's Bible selection in the morning before we jumped into individual academics. I would read the kindergarten selection on M, 3rd grade on T, 5th grade on W, 7th grade on Th. They all enjoyed listening to each other's stories, we had Bible time every day, they got a bit of Old Testament AND a bit of New Testament every week, and by Friday afternoon all that the older kids needed to do was the study guide work.
    Amy

    Fall 2022:
    DS 14 9th
    DD 12 7th
    DS 10 5th
    DD 7 2nd
    DS 5 K
    DS 2

    Comment


      #3
      Except for daily subjects like Latin, math, spelling and grammar, those once-a-week afternoon studies always have quizzes and optional Enrichment activities like observation (in-class or outdoors) or additional reading, so you get to decide if you want to tuck them in on their scheduled days, the Friday of that week, or skip them altogether. Science is best enjoyed with a curious passion for observation and discovery. This is not yet a component that MP knows how to bottle and sell (hey, a pack of preserved insects would be amazing!), but I do know that they include some form of observation: noting habitat and nesting, analyzing an egg, researching historical interactions between humans and birds, etc. Those would obviously need to take up more than the hour to hour-and-a-half time slot of a full core, hence the extra day. Because it's optional, it isn't scheduled in the curriculum manual. The individual lesson plans for Birds/Medicine, however, may be the only subject a family will use, and having all of the activities scheduled for the parent makes it comprehensive and complete.
      Mama of 2, teacher of 3
      Summer: First Start French I
      SY 22/23
      6A, teaching TFL & CC Chreia/Maxim in group, and Koine Greek
      MP2 w/ R&S Arithmetic 3


      Completed MPK, MP1, MP2, 3A, 4A, 5A
      SC B, SC C, SC1 (Phonics/Math), SC2's Writing Book 1

      Comment


        #4
        We'll be starting FMMA in the fall, but all of the FM books are about the same. We always did our afternoon subjects in one day (review flashcards, define vocabulary, read chapter, answer questions, identify map points). If we wanted to do some of the Enrichment (for FMOR, it was researching Hadrian's wall & tomb, taking a virtual tour of the seven hills of Rome, getting some books on Roman legions and warfare--hello, Usborne encyclopedia), we usually just tucked it in to a random light day in the evening. For studying birds this fall, we all collecting dropped bird feathers all summer to look at when the course begins. We have a few nests in our own yard, so we'll study those later. And we've hung a bird feeder outside of a large picture window. Hopefully, when school resumes this summer, we will have our pick of birds to observe before they all fly south, but it will happen as time allows.

        Since it's your first year, expect that you and your student will take more time to complete the basics in the beginnings and less time by the middle of the year. I loved having my student read FM aloud while I was prepping dinner for the day. History is a favorite for both of us, but I know she would have loved to have absconded with the book to her room and read it silently to knock out those questions independently. I knew that my presence kept those answers in complete (coherent) sentences. Almost all of those afternoon subjects took an hour or less.

        We school from 9 to 3 usually, but we have long transitions and an hour for lunch. The difference is that my kids don't have "homework." When we're done, we're usually done. I try to assign flashcard review in early morning before breakfast, at lunch, stuck in the car, or we'll review orally on a walk or bike ride.
        Mama of 2, teacher of 3
        Summer: First Start French I
        SY 22/23
        6A, teaching TFL & CC Chreia/Maxim in group, and Koine Greek
        MP2 w/ R&S Arithmetic 3


        Completed MPK, MP1, MP2, 3A, 4A, 5A
        SC B, SC C, SC1 (Phonics/Math), SC2's Writing Book 1

        Comment


          #5
          I love the idea of one subject per day, but the reality for us was that something always got missed. We now do content subjects together on Mondays. It gets us in school mode but still feels doable if we've had a long weekend, etc.
          Jennifer
          Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

          2022
          DS18: Graduated and living his dream in the automotive trades
          DS17: MP, MPOA, headed to his favorite liberal arts college this fall
          DS15: MP, MPOA
          DS13: Mix of SC 5/6 & SC 7/8
          DD11: Mix of 5M and SC7/8
          DD10: SC3
          DD7: MPK

          Comment


            #6
            I can’t speak to the difference in the two birds lesson plans. Regarding once a week subjects, you can spread those out however you like. MP has found that kids focus and learn better when doing one subject in a big chunk once week rather than spreading it out in bits over the week. So say you have two hours scheduled for classical, geography, science and Christian in the afternoon. Rather than do each subject everyday for 30 minutes each and spending a lot of time putting each book away and getting out the next one, refocusing in a new subject, and trying to get oriented to where you left off, you just do each subject once a week in that time slot. This saves a lot of time and often the work can be completed in an hour and a half each day rather than two hours a day. In reality it often takes even less than that. You basically immerse yourself in that subject all afternoon. You still do some drills and review through the week, but the bulk of the learning is done once a week. Some call this block scheduling.
            some subjects need daily attention to progress and not get too many new concepts in one day. Latin, math, literature, spelling, composition are like this. The content subjects, though, work well to spent a large chunk of time covering the content for that week and then just lightly reviewing throughout the week (with recitation or flashcards).
            Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
            DD, 27, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
            DS, 25, BS '18 mechanical engineering
            DS, 23, BS '20 Chemsitry, pursuing phd at Wash U
            (DDIL married #3 in 2020, MPOA grad, BA '20 philosophy, pusrsing phd at SLU)
            DS, 21, Physics and math major
            DD, 18, dyslexic, 12th grade dual enrolled
            DS, 14, future engineer/scientist/ world conquerer 9th MPOA diploma student
            DD, 8 , 2nd Future astronaut, robot building space artist

            Comment


              #7
              Hello.

              We actually do science one day a week at HLS. We just spread it out for the homeschool plans because we figure you have more flexibility than we do and might enjoy doing science two days a week. Also, our teachers could assign some birds work for Monday when students are at home (I know we encourage bird feeders at home and bird observations).

              Tanya

              Comment


                #8
                Thank you all so much for sharing! This all helps so much!
                2021-2022 will be our 9th year of home schooling.
                *D 13, 8th grade
                *S 11, 6th grade
                *D 9, 4th grade
                *D 7, 2nd grade
                *S 5, K

                Comment

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