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    Dictation

    Does anyone have articles or information behind the purpose of dictation? Since it shows up in TS and the literature guides, I'm curious why it is included. It must have a fair amount of significance to be included on the literature quizzes. I haven't been able to find any articles in the Classical Teacher or elsewhere about it.

    Thanks!
    Heidi

    For 2021-22
    dd- 6th
    ds- 3rd
    dd- 1st
    ds- adding smiles and distractions

    #2
    I don't know the official answer, but I've always seen it as a way to develop attentiveness and working memory.
    Jennifer
    Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

    2021-2022
    DS18: Almost done!
    DS17: MP, MPOA
    DS15: MP, MPOA
    DS12: Mix of SC 5/6 & SC 7/8
    DD11: Mix of 5M and SC7/8
    DD9: SC3
    DD6: MPK

    Comment


      #3
      It's also good preparation for taking notes. When a student can accurately take down what is said, it also shows good listening skills. I also like that it subtly asks students to apply the EGR skills they have been learning all along. Most of the dictation exercises on quizzes do not grade for spelling, but they do grade for capitalization, punctuation, and the presence of all the words.

      We are at the end of 4th, and I have just started asking my student to take notes in math class, especially for formulas and multi-step operations. It's cute because there were a lot of questions about what to write down. I was able to draw from our reduction exercises and outlining in CC Fable, helping get to the main points. My philosophy is that no exercise goes wasted in MP.
      Mama to 2

      Spring start MP1
      Summer start 5A

      Completed MPK, MP1 Math & Enrichment, MP2, 3A, 4A, SC B, SC C,
      SC1 (Phonics/Math), SC2's Writing Book 1

      Comment


        #4
        enbateau "I was able to draw from our reduction exercises and outlining in CC Fable, helping get to the main points."

        This is a brilliant tip!
        Festina lentē,
        Jessica P

        2021-2022 • 12th year HSing • 10th year MP
        12th • AP Latin online, DE Calculus & Physics, HLN
        10th • HLN, Latin online, MPOA
        7th • HLN & Home
        4th • HLN & Home
        Me • Third Form for Adults, MPOA; teaching TFL and co-directing @

        Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School, est. 2016

        Comment


          #5
          We have done the dictation sentences in FSR and TS but I’ll admit dictation in the lit guides is something I’ve neglected. Recently my 5th grader mentioned her lack of note taking ability. ? So here I am...

          enbateau Would you please expand on note taking in math class? Are you doing this every lesson?
          Heidi

          For 2021-22
          dd- 6th
          ds- 3rd
          dd- 1st
          ds- adding smiles and distractions

          Comment


            #6
            Don’t worry, note taking is not something a 5th grader needs to know or spend much time practicing. They really just need to be able to accurately copy from the board down and be able to write good complete sentences. You can. Strengthen this skill in literature with the comprehension questions. After thorough discussion, write the more difficult names, dates, even phrases on the board and have him fill in the rest. Of course after he has completed them be sure to check for correct spelling, capitalization, and punctuation.
            Last edited by Michelle T; 05-02-2021, 06:03 AM.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by VAmom View Post

              enbateau Would you please expand on note taking in math class? Are you doing this every lesson?
              For math, I've found incredible success in the last few lessons having my student copy formulas for distance, speed, perimeter and area. I had her copy a few shapes with her examples that were separate from the book's examples, and it was nice because they can be used for independent work. When my student couldn't remember multiples vs. factors, I also had her write it down, underline the terms in different colors, and include the examples below it. After she wrote it, it was much more secure in hermemory. I do a lot of writing when I do an initial teach, and I told her she should pay attention to things teachers put on a board.

              Another great way to get note-taking going is to bring a clipboard to church. We sit under incredible expository preaching, and my eldest will write down the key passage of scripture, key people and places, and any big take away (theme). I will sometimes give an elbow if I hear something worth writing down. It has helped a lot with my kid's ability to pay attention in church. My mom's church even provides an outline on which to take notes in its bulletin every Sunday.

              I would agree with Michelle that this should stay a low-preasure, low-expectation thing. In fact, I like that the VideoText guy makes students listen first without taking notes. This skill will surely emerge over time, and CC seeds a lot.of those foundational skills.
              Mama to 2

              Spring start MP1
              Summer start 5A

              Completed MPK, MP1 Math & Enrichment, MP2, 3A, 4A, SC B, SC C,
              SC1 (Phonics/Math), SC2's Writing Book 1

              Comment


                #8
                Thank you everyone! I'm glad not all is lost. It makes more sense and seems doable. I will start adding some dictation. enbateau, your explanation makes sense. I hadn't thought of adding in math when they teach formulas and such.

                Heidi
                Heidi

                For 2021-22
                dd- 6th
                ds- 3rd
                dd- 1st
                ds- adding smiles and distractions

                Comment


                  #9
                  VAmom Heidi, here's another tip for developing note-taking skills: read the comprehension questions beforehand and then have E mark the page numbers for the answers as she reads. The page number idea is mentioned in the Iliad and Odyssey guides but I think it's helpful for younger ages, especially if they have a hard time staying engaged. H enjoys trying to take notes so she'll sometimes fill in the answers while I read-aloud from Mammals. I would stick to the page number idea for literature and classical studies though as they sometimes require you to gather from multiple places in the chapter.
                  Jennifer
                  Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

                  2021-2022
                  DS18: Almost done!
                  DS17: MP, MPOA
                  DS15: MP, MPOA
                  DS12: Mix of SC 5/6 & SC 7/8
                  DD11: Mix of 5M and SC7/8
                  DD9: SC3
                  DD6: MPK

                  Comment


                    #10
                    jen1134 I just started doing this with G for Little House in the Bug Woods. He doesn’t recall the details of a story as well so this benefits him. I hadn’t thought of trying it with science. That’s a good idea since those readings are longer. Thank you!
                    Heidi

                    For 2021-22
                    dd- 6th
                    ds- 3rd
                    dd- 1st
                    ds- adding smiles and distractions

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Back to your original question about the purpose of dictation, there is some rationale behind it. I don’t have an expert to quote, but I do know that it is tied to the development of writing skills in the brain. Being able to write an original sentence of one’s own thought is a difficult skill. First there has to be the idea that the child wants ro communicate; then there must be the ability to put that thought into a group of words that makes sense; then there is the ability to hold those precise words in memory long enough to actually write it down. That’s a lot. So, like so many other areas of the language arts, a good path toward mastery is to break up the task into smaller steps, and practice each one. Comprehension questions help students start to think of their own ideas, and that’s great, but we baby step them toward completing the entire guide or exercise by writing their answers down for them so they can copy. Dictation provides practice on the other end of the skill: holding a sentence in mind long enough to write it down correctly. This is an essential part of becoming a writer, and is why dictation is such a great exercise to include often.

                      AMDG,
                      Sarah
                      2020-2021
                      16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
                      DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
                      DS, 17
                      DD, 15
                      DD, 13
                      DD, 11
                      DD, 9
                      DD, 7
                      +DS+
                      DS, 2

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Sarah, thank you for that explanation! It makes wonderful sense. I knew it had to have some purpose.
                        Heidi

                        For 2021-22
                        dd- 6th
                        ds- 3rd
                        dd- 1st
                        ds- adding smiles and distractions

                        Comment

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