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    Redo FFL or just Review?

    I have a 13yo that has not done well at all with First Form Latin-or all of her schoolwork this year actually. Would the Summer Review for FFL be enough to re-learn the material starting now so she can be ready for SFL in the fall? Or should I just have her repeat the entire year? She seems to struggle with memorization. Just now I asked her "Verb families are called what? Noun families are called what?" and she could not answer and acted like she had never heard the word conjugation nor declension.

    This whole year has been stressful for her. She is using the 5th grade level and often needs to retake tests and quizzes after studying again. Is MP just not a good fit for her?

    #2
    I am sorry to hear this year has been a challenge for your daughter. Is this her first year using MP? Is her struggle to memorize new? Perhaps a slower pace with more review would help. I think figuring out why memorization is difficult for her is critical to her success.

    The FFL summer review book just has the unit reviews in them. If she is still struggling to answer the drill questions, just the workbook probably wouldn’t be enough.

    Here is how Highlands suggests parents review Latin during the summer. https://thelatinschool.org/summer-re...n-preparation/. “r5” is for students who just completed FFL.

    We organize our vocabulary flash cards in baseball card pages inside a 3-ring binder. With each kid, I take turns saying the vocabulary, declensions and conjugations Latin to English or English to Latin at least once a week during the school year and 3-4 times during the summer. It goes quickly and the kids like to see if I can remember things.
    Last edited by VAmom; 04-21-2021, 05:39 AM.
    Heidi

    For 2021-22
    dd- 6th
    ds- 3rd
    dd- 1st
    ds- adding smiles and distractions

    Comment


      #3
      I will say that it took one of my kids 2 years to complete FFL because we went at a slower pace to ensure mastery. That meant lots of oral drill and review, and if he wasn't prepared for a quiz we would take extra time to review before moving ahead. The forms series is cumulative, each new topic builds on previous topics, so if FFL is not mastered, it will be very difficult to experience success going forward. I think Cheryl Lowe writes somewhere that children enjoy what they have thoroughly learned and are frustrated by what they have only half learned. That is certainly true in my experience teaching Latin. One of my kids memorizes very easily. After I teach/explain the lesson and we go over the new vocabulary together, she does the workbook mostly independently and memorizes eveything without much oral review from me. HOWEVER, that's not typical. Other kids I've taught require daily oral recitation along with the workbook to really commit everything to long term memory. My goal as a teacher is to spend Monday thoroughly presenting the new material, then on subsequent days do a quick oral review of the current lesson's saying, vocab, and grammar rules PLUS oral recitation of the forms, grammar questions, and vocabulary listed in the left margin of the teacher guide for that lesson (aiming to cover that review material over the course of the week, not everything each day). I would say it takes about 10 minutes each day, but consistency is key. This daily recitation ensures that old vocabulary and grammar are constantly reviewed until the student can recite them in their sleep!

      If your daughter did not have this kind of daily review, and you are willing to work over the summer, I would suggest spending a little time every day doing oral review of the grammar questions, vocabulary worksheets, and all conjugations and declesnsions learned in FFL. When those are mastered, use the FFL Review book for written review.

      As to MP not being a good fit...if your daughter struggles with everything in the curriculum, is she perhaps placed above her ability? If she has learning difficulties, you might check out the Simply Classical forum which has tons of resources for bringing classical education to out of the box learners. I believe a classical education can be beneficial to almost every child, but the application will look quite different depending on each one's strengths and weaknesses.
      Amy

      Fall 2022:
      DS 14 9th
      DD 12 7th
      DS 10 5th
      DD 7 2nd
      DS 5 K
      DS 2

      Comment


        #4
        Agreeing with Heidi and Amy. Does she review her other subjects on a regular basis or is she only studying during the review lessons/before quizzes and tests? To learn something well, kids (and adults!) have to spread out their practice over time, practice what they know at the same time as what they don’t, and they need to practice pulling things from their memory.

        It’s also important for them to work with concepts in different ways: written, oral, and (for many kids) multi-sensory. This allows them to think about it in different ways.

        So, in practical terms, our children need to:
        1. Practice in different ways
        2. Review multiple times a week
        3. Practice well-known facts/concepts with lesser-known ones
        4. Try pulling facts/concepts from memory rather than always seeing it in front of them
        Some ideas for this:
        • Organize flashcards (for all subjects) by Current Unit, Past Mastered, Past Unmastered. Divide the past sets into smaller packs to make them manageable as the year progresses. Each day, she would study her current pack, a mastered pack, and an unmastered pack (so don't hesitate to make those past packs really small!). To change things up and help her stay engaged:
          • She can read the front/backs of a pack and then go back through reading only the front and trying to retrieve the back from memory
          • For mastered packs, she can read the backs and try to retrieve the front from memory
          • She can make her own set of cards that has the term on one card and the back on another card and then try to match them. She can leave her matches out for you to check/review.
          • Read the term then write the definition in a notebook; go back the next day and fill in the related terms from memory
        • Make a timeline with hand-drawn pictures and labels for the current/previous classical studies units
        • Make a character book with pictures and labels for each character in a literature or classical studies unit. (see examples in pics, done by one of my boys when he was about your daughter's age)
        • Color-code flashcards by themes, relationships, or locations. For example, gods of Greece in gold, Greek heroes in blue, historical figures in green; people from Greece in green, Romans in red, etc. Dates could be color-coded by whether they refer to a war, a victory, etc.
        • She can write a paragraph, or give an oral narration, about a topic/character/event
        • Vocabulary for literature can be done the same way as the flashcard ideas above
        If she's already working in this manner, there might be more going on whether it's just placement or something deeper. Many of us have children who struggle in various ways (I have several of them!), so please don't hesitate to reach out with more info/thoughts.

        We all want to see your daughter thrive and, with the exception of a high school science course, I've seen that happen within MP with all of my kids, struggling or not.


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        Attached Files
        Last edited by jen1134; 04-21-2021, 09:38 AM.
        Jennifer
        Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

        2022
        DS18: Graduated and living his dream in the automotive trades
        DS17: MP, MPOA, headed to his favorite liberal arts college this fall
        DS15: MP, MPOA
        DS13: Mix of SC 5/6 & SC 7/8
        DD11: Mix of 5M and SC7/8
        DD10: SC3
        DD7: MPK

        Comment


          #5
          Jen, This advice is going to be beneficial to so many. Thank you for posting such thorough study tips!!

          Comment


            #6
            robomom11 , just hopping over to say that if you want to take a closer look at customizing her coursework, feel free to email me any time, [email protected]. We can often customize for students who seem to find themselves "in over their heads" for whatever reason.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by jen1134 View Post
              Agreeing with Heidi and Amy. Does she review her other subjects on a regular basis or is she only studying during the review lessons/before quizzes and tests? To learn something well, kids (and adults!) have to spread out their practice over time, practice what they know at the same time as what they don’t, and they need to practice pulling things from their memory.

              It’s also important for them to work with concepts in different ways: written, oral, and (for many kids) multi-sensory. This allows them to think about it in different ways.

              So, in practical terms, our children need to:
              1. Practice in different ways
              2. Review multiple times a week
              3. Practice well-known facts/concepts with lesser-known ones
              4. Try pulling facts/concepts from memory rather than always seeing it in front of them
              Some ideas for this:
              • Organize flashcards (for all subjects) by Current Unit, Past Mastered, Past Unmastered. Divide the past sets into smaller packs to make them manageable as the year progresses. Each day, she would study her current pack, a mastered pack, and an unmastered pack (so don't hesitate to make those past packs really small!). To change things up and help her stay engaged:
                • She can read the front/backs of a pack and then go back through reading only the front and trying to retrieve the back from memory
                • For mastered packs, she can read the backs and try to retrieve the front from memory
                • She can make her own set of cards that has the term on one card and the back on another card and then try to match them. She can leave her matches out for you to check/review.
                • Read the term then write the definition in a notebook; go back the next day and fill in the related terms from memory
              • Make a timeline with hand-drawn pictures and labels for the current/previous classical studies units
              • Make a character book with pictures and labels for each character in a literature or classical studies unit. (see examples in pics, done by one of my boys when he was about your daughter's age)
              • Color-code flashcards by themes, relationships, or locations. For example, gods of Greece in gold, Greek heroes in blue, historical figures in green; people from Greece in green, Romans in red, etc. Dates could be color-coded by whether they refer to a war, a victory, etc.
              • She can write a paragraph, or give an oral narration, about a topic/character/event
              • Vocabulary for literature can be done the same way as the flashcard ideas above
              If she's already working in this manner, there might be more going on whether it's just placement or something deeper. Many of us have children who struggle in various ways (I have several of them!), so please don't hesitate to reach out with more info/thoughts.

              We all want to see your daughter thrive and, with the exception of a high school science course, I've seen that happen within MP with all of my kids, struggling or not.


              Click image for larger version Name:	45C812FF-F558-4434-B920-A1B3F8A20C0B_1_105_c.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	41.1 KB ID:	129726 Click image for larger version Name:	02D14900-8E41-47C4-BDB7-D9B9E1479F09_1_105_c.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	43.4 KB ID:	129728
              Thank you for linking your website! I have a large family and have no idea when helpful advice comes from someone who has two kids or with a handful. Managing five kids at the table with two teenagers and a college student is much harder than a couple of younger kids. I am just going to have to buckle down and make sure she is actually reviewing every day and not just passively reviewing.

              Comment

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