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MP1 and Multi-Syllable Words

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    MP1 and Multi-Syllable Words

    I'm looking ahead for my rising first-grader to see how multi-syllable words are taught. I see that there are multi-syllable words in STT and MSTT far before TSI introduces them. I've ordered everything and have looked through and marked every word I think my child will struggle with in all of the literature. Many of the words have predictable rules for why the vowels say certain sounds, yet I didn't see any explicit teaching notes. For instance, the word "mother" appears in the syllabication list for Lesson 1 of STT, and the o says a lazy schwa sound, but I didn't see the O like monkey flashcard get flagged. I haven't read every single page of every TM, but should we just present the words as a "repeat after me if you can't figure it out yourself"? If you've taught this grade, can you give me an estimate for how much time you spend on explaining the rules behind how all of these words come together? I hadn't found MP when my eldest was in first, and we used LoE, which has a methodical roll-out of multi-syllable words, prefixes and suffixes. My little guy has now read almost every single story in the American Language Series K readers through Sounds of the Sea. I just noticed that they are controlled to one-syllable words. He has mastered almost every major vowel team, digraph and blend for decoding, and he reads with decent inflection (mostly sounding out words in his head if he has trouble with a new word). I'm just meeting a bit of resistance for two-syllable words outside of ed, er or ing as suffixes and be, re and to as first syllables. Does it just magically click for most kids? Should I just relax and teach the hard, three- and four-syllable words as sight words and wait for TSII to get into the rules?
    Mama of 2, teacher of 3
    Summer: First Start French I
    SY 22/23
    6A, teaching TFL & CC Chreia/Maxim in group, and Koine Greek
    MP2 w/ R&S Arithmetic 3


    Completed MPK, MP1, MP2, 3A, 4A, 5A
    SC B, SC C, SC1 (Phonics/Math), SC2's Writing Book 1

    #2
    Originally posted by enbateau View Post
    Does it just magically click for most kids? Should I just relax and teach the hard, three- and four-syllable words as sight words and wait for TSII to get into the rules?
    Hi enbateau. I have a First Grader this year and it did feel like it magically clicked in a sense. But I guess we will see how it goes with the younger two.

    And yes, I would wait until TS gets to it to cover the rules. By the time my First Grader got to multi-syllable words in STT, he was ready to read them. i didn't flag any extra flashcards other than what was listed in the TM of STT and MSTT.

    Some time was spent going over the rules and working on how the words go, as needed. To do so, I would heavily rely on the Classical Phonics book to do the work and that seemed to help my oldest a lot. That is a gem of a book.

    We also buttressed what he was learning for school with lots of family reading, audiobooks and reading on his own and I think that helped a lot.
    Tentative Plan '22/'23 - 5th Year MP
    Homeschool Dad & Tutorial Magister
    8S, Rising 3nd MP @ HLN & Home
    6D, Rising 1st MP @ HLN & Home
    4S, Rising K MP @ HLN & Home

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      #3
      I definitely think there is a clicking point. At some point my 5 and 6 year olds both went from sounding out cvc words to suddenly reading 3+ syllable words that they had definitely never learned a rule for. When we encounter a word they can’t figure out I just coach them through it and move on. I figure they’ll get all the rules they need eventually through the spelling work.
      2021-2022
      DS1 (7) - MP2
      DD (6) - MP1
      DS2 (3) - SCA
      +6 little souls in Heaven+

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        #4
        I’ve asked about this a few times, maybe just in the Facebook group. It seems that most people say their kid just magically learns to read bigger words. I use AAR and Explode the Code as well, for this very reason. They both have a list of syllabication rules, but my son still has trouble. For example, he keeps wanting to say pret-end instead of pre-tend. My older, publicly schooled son, is not that great with reading and vocabulary, so I’ve been really focused on this for my 1st grader, and I’m still shrugging my shoulders over here.

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          #5
          In my experience most students eventually "click" though not always at the same time. For some students the 'repeat after me' technique works ususally this is for natural readers who seemed to pick up reading with little or no phonic instruction. While others need the 'coaching' approach because they need to work through it in order to remember it. This is the method I prefer for all. When you get to multisyllabic words sometimes it helps to cover part of the word with your finger so the student decodes a bit at a time. When going over words before reading STT or MSTT these phonics lessons should be quicker so don't spend too much time going over rules and such they will get this within the TS program. TS II is where syllabication becomes more of a focus. Until then, when your student needs help, break up the word, cover part of it, look for smaller words or phonograms within the word that can be decoded first. For example covering a prefix or suffix. But coaching through syllabication until "rules" are addressed within the curriculum is the best advice.

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            #6
            Thanks, Michelle. That is what we are already doing, so it is nice to know that it's not only age appropriate, it's part of the MP approach. I'm thankful that my little guy has an incredible memory for words that we preview before reading a story and for words that appear in new stories from previous stories. It really seems like reading experience and context give him 99% of what he needs to decode a word. It's word attack of multi-syllable words out of context that gives him the most frustration. I am still on the fence about covering a couple of multi-syllable word lessons before we start MP1 this spring, but I am also curious to see how he does with 100% MP. For those of us who began elsewhere, the struggle is real!
            Mama of 2, teacher of 3
            Summer: First Start French I
            SY 22/23
            6A, teaching TFL & CC Chreia/Maxim in group, and Koine Greek
            MP2 w/ R&S Arithmetic 3


            Completed MPK, MP1, MP2, 3A, 4A, 5A
            SC B, SC C, SC1 (Phonics/Math), SC2's Writing Book 1

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              #7
              I love the sounding out approach Michelle describes, especially for struggling learners. They already have a hard time remembering the sounds of letters. Using syllabication rules for reading seems helpful on the surface but it would have caused unnecessary pain for my children. Instead of being able to look at the letters/blends/teams in front of them, they would have been trying to remember the syllabication rules which would have crowded the phonics further out of their memory.

              Instead, with the approach Michelle T describes, they can look at the word in front of them, take it one step at a time, and move on to the next word with confidence. This is also the approach my own mom used when homeschooling me. When I reached a difficult word, she always said with an encouraging tone, "Sound it out." I do the same thing with my children and I can see it reframe their perspective. Suddenly they remember that they don't have to tackle the word all at once. They can take it step by step. This reduces a lot of anxiety for them.
              Jennifer
              Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

              2022
              DS18: Graduated and living his dream in the automotive trades
              DS17: MP, MPOA, headed to his favorite liberal arts college this fall
              DS15: MP, MPOA
              DS13: Mix of SC 5/6 & SC 7/8
              DD11: Mix of 5M and SC7/8
              DD10: SC3
              DD7: MPK

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                #8
                I have used SST and MSST with a variety of readers now, both the "natural" and the "struggling", although I think I have taught more of the latter than the former. I agree with Michelle that her approach works best for all. I do teach my students to work through a word one syllable at a time, but I do not require them to identify the syllables on their own. I don't teach syllable rules to students, but I use them myself to chunk up the words.

                When I write the new words or the Pronounce and Say words on the board, I will often include the bullets between the syllables, so when I teach that word, it is more manageable for the students.

                Also, I have found that sometimes a student can read each syllable, but they still cannot go back and blend the whole word together because by the time they get to the third and final syllable, they have forgotten what the first syllable said! I have started (particularly with my more struggling students) to clearly repeat each syllable back to them after they read it correctly. They may stumble around and read a syllable incorrectly with the wrong vowel sound or by adding or omitting a consonant, and after I coach them and they finally read it correctly, I repeat it back to them in hope that by the time we get through the next and next syllable, they might actually remember what the first syllable said and be able to put it all together! (Phew...teaching little ones to read is hard work, isn't it?!)

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