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    Graphing Question

    My MPKer and I are completing a graph of friends' birthdays by season. I remember from the Sodalitas videos that the Kindergarten teachers asked a question of the week and graphed the results from time to time. I made a simple graph with an x-axis of "seasons" and y-axis of "number of people." I used the same template from when we graphed favorite apple colors (x-axis) and number of people who liked them (y-axis).

    In researching whether graph titles get underlined, I read that the x-axis should be the independent variable (the thing which doesn't change) and the y-axis should be the dependent variable (the thing that does). Can someone with more scientific wisdom than me make sure I'm on the right track here. It seems wrong to put seasons on the horizontal scale (x-axis) and number of people on the vertical scale? My eldest is in MP4, and her Rod & Staff Arithmetic 4 book (p. 207) had an identical bar graph called Fourth Graders' Birthdays where the seasons were on the y-axis and the pupils were on the x-axis. That makes sense to me because the thing changing is the season in which each student is born. Can someone help me understand why number of people is the variable and season is the constant when infectious disease graphs have dates on the bottom and people infected on the x-axis (hence our "curve").

    I feel silly for overthinking this, but I hate teaching my kids the wrong way to do something and having to backtrack later down the road.

    Mama of 2, teacher of 3

    SY 21/22
    5A w/ SFL & CC Narrative class
    MP1

    Completed MPK, MP1 Math & Enrichment, MP2, 3A, 4A
    SC B, SC C, SC1 (Phonics/Math), SC2's Writing Book 1

    #2
    You are not working with numerical data. A bar graph is a way to show survey type responses, not numerical comparisons. Show the data however you want to make the data easily interpreted - a bar graph in this instance.

    I think.
    ~ Carrie
    Catholic mom to four - ages 11, 9, 7, and 5
    8th year homeschooling, 3rd year MP!
    2020-2021: 6M with FFL, 4M with FFL, and some of 1st grade

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      #3
      Paging our resident engineers
      momgineer Mom2mthj
      Jennifer
      Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

      2022
      DS18: Graduated and living his dream in the automotive trades
      DS17: MP, MPOA, headed to his favorite liberal arts college this fall
      DS15: MP, MPOA
      DS13: Mix of SC 5/6 & SC 7/8
      DD11: Mix of 5M and SC7/8
      DD10: SC3
      DD7: MPK

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        #4
        As Carrie mentioned, a bar graph is not the same as a Cartesian coordinate (x/y) graph. You can turn a bar graph either way. As far as an x/y graph- think of a function such as y=x+5. You choose and x value to put in and get an y value out. The y is “dependent” on the x. The x can vary- it’s a line and not a point so there are an infinite number of x values that can be put in. The x does change in that sense. It’s just that the y value we get out is dependent on what we put in. So in a scientific graph, we put in our “input variable” on the x axis and the “resulting variable” on the y axis. If we are testing the distance a block slides down an incline and we change the height of the incline, we would graph the height along the x axis and the distance along the y axis.
        This pdf has a nice explanation. http://academy.science-resources.org/HowtoGraphHS.pdf
        Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
        DD, 27, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
        DS, 25, BS '18 mechanical engineering
        DS, 23, BS '20 Chemsitry, pursuing phd at Wash U
        (DDIL married #3 in 2020, MPOA grad, BA '20 philosophy, pusrsing phd at SLU)
        DS, 21, Physics and math major
        DD, 18, dyslexic, 12th grade dual enrolled
        DS, 14, future engineer/scientist/ world conquerer 9th MPOA diploma student
        DD, 8 , 2nd Future astronaut, robot building space artist

        Comment


          #5
          Yay! That makes perfect sense. I can keep my homemade graph where I put no thought into axes and variables.

          Thanks, all.
          Mama of 2, teacher of 3

          SY 21/22
          5A w/ SFL & CC Narrative class
          MP1

          Completed MPK, MP1 Math & Enrichment, MP2, 3A, 4A
          SC B, SC C, SC1 (Phonics/Math), SC2's Writing Book 1

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