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FFL: Examples of when Latin omits linking verbs

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    FFL: Examples of when Latin omits linking verbs

    A small note in the TM says that Latin often omits linking verbs that are obvious. It would be nice to have a few more examples a student might come across in future readings (be it in translations, mottos, history, etc). The given example is Mater Italiae Roma: The mother of Italy, Rome (or, The mother of Italy is Rome).
    Mama to 2

    Spring start MP1
    Summer start 5A

    Completed MPK, MP1 Math & Enrichment, MP2, 3A, 4A, SC B, SC C,
    SC1 (Phonics/Math), SC2's Writing Book 1

    #2
    Also, tanya . I just saw the Latin Recitation CD and DVD. #1-Is this offered as streaming? #2-Does it separate out only what a student would need for First Form or Second Form Latin? The sample started with Fourth Form Latin, and I wondered if it might scroll through so many verbs and nouns that my student hasn't learned yet that it would not hold her attention because she wouldn't know when to jump in or hang out.

    And can someone please tell me when to use the Latin Grammar Recitation Flashcards and green booklet that I ordered with FFL? I keep staring at it, but I don't know when to use it. It seems at times to be redundant and at times different from the daily recitation from the TM. Without having a note or a lesson plan for when to use it, it's not getting used.
    Last edited by enbateau; 01-23-2021, 12:56 PM.
    Mama to 2

    Spring start MP1
    Summer start 5A

    Completed MPK, MP1 Math & Enrichment, MP2, 3A, 4A, SC B, SC C,
    SC1 (Phonics/Math), SC2's Writing Book 1

    Comment


      #3
      We are doing FFL this year too. The booklet is kind of a guide to what's on the flashcards and which cards should be used when. For each lesson, it will tell you which cards to use and of these, which are additions or changes from the previous lesson. I wrote the weekly changes in my FFL TM so I wouldn't have to keep consulting the booklet. I write a couple of days of grammar cards review into her weekly schedule. At this point, I think I need to review them more than she does!
      9th year homeschooling, 3rd year with MP
      Girl 6M with 6A lit
      Girl 3A
      Girl K/SC1
      Girl toddler

      Levels we have completed: Preschool, Jr. K, 1, 2, 4NU, 5

      Comment


        #4
        A few examples spring to mind:

        Dominus illuminatio mea. - The motto of Oxford University. Supply est. The Lord is my light.

        Vox Populi, Vox Dei. Supply est. The voice of the people is the voice of God.

        Pax Vobiscum. Supply sit, the subjunctive of est. (May) peace (be) with you.

        Gloria Patri et Filio et Spiritui Sancto, sicut erat in principio et nunc et semper et in saecula saeculorum. Supply sit, the subjunctive of est. (May) glory (be) to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit, as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end.

        From the Vulgate: Ave, gratia plena, Dominus tecum; benedicta tu in mulieribus. Est and es may be supplied in the clauses. Hail full of grace, the Lord (is) with thee; blessed (art) thou among women.

        There are more advanced constructions in which esse may be omitted, but I believe that you don't need those until you read Caesar.

        Cheers.
        Bonnie

        Comment


          #5
          Bonnie This is exactly what I was looking for! I appreciate you finding those for us. The Gloria Patri and Vox populi saying are especially helpful since we've already learned these in LC.
          Mama to 2

          Spring start MP1
          Summer start 5A

          Completed MPK, MP1 Math & Enrichment, MP2, 3A, 4A, SC B, SC C,
          SC1 (Phonics/Math), SC2's Writing Book 1

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Heather in GA View Post
            We are doing FFL this year too. The booklet is kind of a guide to what's on the flashcards and which cards should be used when. For each lesson, it will tell you which cards to use and of these, which are additions or changes from the previous lesson. I wrote the weekly changes in my FFL TM so I wouldn't have to keep consulting the booklet. I write a couple of days of grammar cards review into her weekly schedule. At this point, I think I need to review them more than she does!
            Wow, I cannot believe I missed pages 23-26 (Recitation by Lesson #) in this booklet. Flipping through I saw what I thought was just an index (pp. 5-8), but I figured when I saw Fourth Form in the back that nothing was in between. Thankfully we have been doing a full Recitation 2-3 days a week, but this will streamline it as we get deeper into it all.

            Last questions: How often should we be doing the entirety of the Latin grammar questions in the back of the 2nd edition student workbook vs. just the weeks we are working on? I do the entire thing 3 days a week (all 85 questions). I feel like even then there are things that are forgotten. Do we keep this up until the end of FFL? Also, are there similar questions for SFL? I heard SFL was getting a makeover by Spring to include all that parsing.
            Mama to 2

            Spring start MP1
            Summer start 5A

            Completed MPK, MP1 Math & Enrichment, MP2, 3A, 4A, SC B, SC C,
            SC1 (Phonics/Math), SC2's Writing Book 1

            Comment


              #7
              Hello.

              I'm not sure why we don't stream the Latin Recitation CD/DVD. I'm going to check on that. I think it is broken down by grammar form, so you can go as far as you like and then stop. There is no need to listen beyond your students' knowledge of each form. As your student learns more, you will be doing a longer recitation.

              For the grammar questions, I think our teachers only go through all of them (once they get unwieldy) once a week or maybe even once a month for the ones that are really easy. The rest of the week, they only do the new ones and problem ones that students need to work on. So they treat it like our primary recitations: The longer the recitation gets, there isn't time to do every question, so they mark the questions students haven't mastered and use those along with new questions, reviewing the ones they have mastered once a month or so.

              At the beginning of the year, they do all of them because they are working to mastery on new material, but I give you permission not to do the 85 every day that your student has learned. Just circle the ones that need work and focus on those along with the new ones. There are questions with SFL as well, so it is good that you have worked hard to master the FFL questions. It will make that SFL year much easier.

              Tanya

              Comment


                #8
                enbateau Here's a funny non-Latin one to add to your list from Instagram: Link in profile.
                Ha! I was just adding more words to that quirky little partial sentence in a post and it reminded me of your post here.
                Festina lentē,
                Jessica P

                2021-2022 • 12th year HSing • 10th year MP
                12th • AP Latin online, DE Calculus & Physics, HLN
                10th • HLN, Latin online, MPOA
                7th • HLN & Home
                4th • HLN & Home
                Me • Third Form for Adults, MPOA; teaching TFL and co-directing @

                Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School, est. 2016

                Comment


                  #9
                  Hello.

                  We just don't have the Latin Recitation DVD/CD streaming-ready, but I'm adding it to the list, so we will get it up there when we can.

                  Tanya

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