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    Latin studies

    What is the bottom line on Latin as far as what are the standard amount of years a student needs to cover? How many forms? I have been ill and some of the MP levels have been missed. So what levels are the MUST courses?

    #2
    That's an interesting question. We would say to study Latin all the way through high school, accomplishing what you can. There isn't a golden place to get to. The reasoning would be to master the grammar so that you can then translate authors such as Caesar, Cicero, and Vergil. But not everyone gets there. Honestly, every year your students do Latin is a year that you are training their minds. They are learning an organized structured language that is like a brain exercise. Latin helps them to be better students, it shows them how to work hard, and it transforms the way they look at the English language. So don't worry how far you get, and don't let Latin study put too much pressure on you. But continue to study it at whatever pace you need in your life at this time. It is the constant exposure that does the most good. If it takes you two years to get through a Form, that is fine. But it is better to consistently work your way through the grammar than to take large breaks and then have to start again. Latin and math are similar in that they are building block courses. You have to start at the bottom and build steadily or you won't be successful. So a slower, measured pace is the best solution to shoot for. As you move forward, it doesn't really matter which courses you complete. Just stay the course, and anything you give your children will be of benefit.

    Tanya

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      #3
      Thank you. I was thinking more about my last child in that to wait until 5-6 to start First Form and skipping Prima and LC. That would spare me a little more stress for example. ??‍♀️

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        #4
        Oh, that is just fine to do! Sorry for such a long-winded reply when I could have answered in a few words!

        Tanya

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          #5
          Basically Prima and LC are Intro courses and that info will be repeated in First Form. If needed, it is ok to skip Prima and LC and start First Form in 5th or 6th. Once you get to First Form though, you need to go form by form, level by level and not skip. You can speed up or slow down but not skip levels. As Tanya said, better to go slow and steady than not go at all.
          Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
          DD, 26, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
          DS, 24, BS '18 mechanical engineering
          DS, 22, BS '20 Chemsitry, pursuing phd at Wash U
          (DDIL married #3 in 2020, MPOA grad, BA '20 philosophy, pusrsing phd at SLU)
          DS, 20, Physics major
          DD, 17, dyslexic, 11th grade customizednMP plus co-op
          DS, 13, future engineer/scientist/ world conquerer 8A
          DD, 7 , 1ST Future astronaut, robot building space artist

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            #6
            Thank you ladies!! That’s what I assumed BUT I’m a train wreck this year so I needed to be certain! ❤️

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              #7
              Originally posted by tanya View Post
              Oh, that is just fine to do! Sorry for such a long-winded reply when I could have answered in a few words!

              Tanya
              Not at all!! It’s all good!! ❤️

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                #8
                One of the advantages to homeschooling is that when our lives become train wrecks, we have flexibility!

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by momgineer View Post
                  Basically Prima and LC are Intro courses and that info will be repeated in First Form. If needed, it is ok to skip Prima and LC and start First Form in 5th or 6th. Once you get to First Form though, you need to go form by form, level by level and not skip. You can speed up or slow down but not skip levels. As Tanya said, better to go slow and steady than not go at all.
                  Totally agree about this as a different option, especially in a household where Latin has been 'in the house and homeschool' already so the younger kids are not starting from scratch. Plus, they have older siblings who can help. So many bonuses there!
                  Festina lentē,
                  Jessica P

                  2021-2022 • 12th year HSing • 10th year MP
                  12th • AP Latin online, DE Calculus & Physics, HLN
                  10th • HLN, Latin online, MPOA
                  7th • HLN & Home
                  4th • HLN & Home
                  Me • Third Form for Adults, MPOA; teaching TFL and co-directing @

                  Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School, est. 2016

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                    #10
                    My husband and I both teach Classics at the college level. I suggest doing only as much as you can do well and encouraging them to study Latin in college to fulfill the language requirement. We're always happy to get students who have mastered the basics but haven't learned advanced grammar yet. It's more difficult to teach students who have been exposed to everything but really haven't memorized or mastered much. It would be better to move at half-speed or take time off and not make it to reading than to move more quickly than you can handle and produce a young Latinist who doesn't really remember what he was supposed to have learned.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by Meg323 View Post
                      My husband and I both teach Classics at the college level. I suggest doing only as much as you can do well and encouraging them to study Latin in college to fulfill the language requirement. We're always happy to get students who have mastered the basics but haven't learned advanced grammar yet. It's more difficult to teach students who have been exposed to everything but really haven't memorized or mastered much. It would be better to move at half-speed or take time off and not make it to reading than to move more quickly than you can handle and produce a young Latinist who doesn't really remember what he was supposed to have learned.
                      I'm just now logging back in to have a gander. Thank you!

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                        #12
                        Hi, I have a son who completed Latina Christiana I and II, without any issues. In receiving First Form Latin, I saw that it reviews what we have already covered. Would second form Latin also be review- should I move to Third form?

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by Brynne View Post
                          Hi, I have a son who completed Latina Christiana I and II, without any issues. In receiving First Form Latin, I saw that it reviews what we have already covered. Would second form Latin also be review- should I move to Third form?
                          Hi Brynne,

                          You are correct First Form Latin begins with a review with what was covered in Latina Christiana (LC.) This is because LC is an introduction to First Form. What your son mastered in LC will help him master the new content of First Form. You complete each form before moving onto the next. MP does a wonderful job of building on the students’ prior knowledge so they continue to be successful in their Latin studies.

                          Heidi
                          Heidi

                          For 2021-22
                          dd- 6th
                          ds- 3rd
                          dd- 1st
                          ds- adding smiles and distractions

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                            #14
                            Brynne,

                            Heidi is correct. Each Latin level builds upon what the previous level introduced and each level contains some review of skills considered mastered. Because Prima and Latina are both introductory and for younger children, the skills are reviewed again in First Form Latin (FFL), though less time is spent on them. An older student will pick these up more quickly. You do NOT want to skip any levels of the Form Series or your student will be lost. Yes, some of the material is recognized from Latina but certainly not all.

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                              #15
                              Brynne,

                              If you feel your student has really mastered LC I - II, we do have a transition course that we used to sell that we could print in-house for you. It transitions you from LCII to SFL. There are a few things in FFL that aren't covered in LCI-II, and if you don't feel your student needs the benefit of the repeated FFL material, you can bridge the gap with the transition lessons and then move directly to SFL. But you can't go to SFL without that bridge from LCII, so if you decide to go that route, just email [email protected], and we will be glad to give you the transition book when you purchase SFL.

                              But Heidi and Michelle are correct that the FFL review is valuable if your student hasn't mastered the material you have already covered in LC. It's really just a matter of where your student is and what you feel would best benefit him. Either way, we have him covered!

                              Tanya

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