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    2e kids

    I hate to ask this on a typical forum, but I don't know where else to ask other than here on the MP forum. How do you adapt your curriculum to your 2e child? I'm dealing with the stereotypical issues: handwriting is tough, she isn't ready to be jumped to another grade with more writing; The read-alouds are below her own reading level. Yes, there is a lot to be learned from the read-alouds, and we try to follow the plan as is, but I have to supplement with read-alouds that are much higher. There are other discrepancies, but if you have a 2e, you know what I mean. I am just wondering if anyone has suggestions for taking a 2e child through a "box" curriculum. Thanks in advance for the advise!!!

    #2
    What age and ability is your child?
    Married to DH for 14 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

    DS11- Simply Classical 5/6
    DD9- Simply Classical 5/6 (neurotypical, but schooling with big brother to save mom's sanity)
    DD 6- Classic Core First Grade

    We've completed:
    Classic Core Jr. kindergarten, kindergarten, first grade, and second grade.
    Simply Classical levels B, C, 1, 2, 3, and 4.

    Comment


      #3
      Colomama My daughter is eight. Her reading level in Lexile points is at 920L, or solidly at the end of fifth grade. Her listening comprehension is at about eighth grade. Her handwriting is at about the beginning of K! We are using a different math program- we use Singapore Math and Beast Academy. She is in BA 2. She has ASP and vision issues that interfere, but does well with geometry, logic, and patterns. I don't know her IQ. I was going to have a test done at age eight, but covid hit. Our ED Psychologist thinks that her visual/spacial IQ is 150, but her verbal score wouldn't be so great. She's a lot like my brother....so maybe 135? I'm hesitant to suggest higher. With dyslexia, dysgraphia, SPD, ASD, vision issues, etc. I think that she would struggle in processing fast enough to hit much higher than 135. Does that answer your question at all? Her obsession is human anatomy...seven years running.

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        #4
        Colomama BTW ,she received a concussion in 09/19. She lost a lot of ground in math. She wasn't even able to read in January of this year. I never taught her how to read, although we had spent five years on phonemic awareness and visual discrimination. One day in February she just started reading, and she just kept going.

        Comment


          #5
          Jessica Louise Hi! From what you described if your daughter, she kinda sounds more aspie. But of course I don’t have the details! In general, all special needs children need a specially tailored curriculum. MP is such a solid curriculum, and there is a lot a room to bend as needed.

          sorry to not give specifics advice, just know that meeting your child’s academic needs is different for everyone!

          -Victoria

          at home:
          boy - 3rd grade
          boy - 2nd grade
          boy - k/1st
          girl - toddler

          Comment


            #6
            Which MP grade/level are you doing with your child?
            Christine

            2020/2021)
            DD1 8/23/09 - MP4 (Math 5)
            DS2 9/1/11 - SC 5/6 2 year pace
            DD3 2/9/13 -SC2/Storytime Treasures/AAR

            Previous Years
            DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3, SC4, SC 5/6
            DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK, SC2/AAR/Storytime Treasures), Traditional Spelling 1
            DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others, MPK, AAR)

            Comment


              #7
              Maybe my coffee hasn't started working yet, but I can't figure out what a "2e" student is.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Michelle T View Post
                Maybe my coffee hasn't started working yet, but I can't figure out what a "2e" student is.
                It’s the lack of coffee. 2e means “twice exceptional” — learning disability or other diagnosis (ASD, etc) yet gifted in some areas.
                Jennifer
                Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

                DS16: MP, MPOA, HSC, Breaking the Barrier French
                DS15: MP, MPOA, HSC
                DS12: Mash-up of 6/7M
                DS11: SC 4
                DD9: 3A with First Form Latin (long story!)
                DD8: Mash-up of SC 1/2
                DD5: January birthday, using SC B and C as a two-year JrK

                Comment


                  #9
                  Thank you Jen! That makes perfect sense!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    My son and daughter are both 2e kids. So maybe I might be able to help... My students both have significant language learning challenges, but they are very advanced in math and other subjects. Their tested IQ is also very high despite all of their many learning challenges.

                    We actually were not able to make MP work in the early grades because they were so "all over the place" with their skill based subjects (reading, writing, arithmetic, etc.). Using a set curriculum would have taken more work to modify than it would have saved. We switched over to MP when my kids were in 4th and 5th grades. (We used the "4th grade for new users" package.) I thought a lot of it would be easy for my kids, but MP materials are very advanced IMHO. (Those classical and christian studies tests are quite challenging for the average 3rd and 4th grade students!). We used a different math, science, and spelling and it was very little work to switch those subjects out because the focus in the later cores wasn't on learning to read.

                    I hear you saying that you want to use different books than the ones suggested, and I want to just encourage you to do that. Make the curriculum work for you, not the other way around! Maybe you can use the ideas in the core as jumping off points for exploration. Have fun with the core and just enjoy this time you have with your child. No book police will show up at your house if you vary from the teacher's manual. I promise!

                    The thing about parenting is that there are no instruction manuals or one "right" way to do things. What works for one child who is 2e, won't necessarily work for your child. A lot of times it takes making some mistakes and learning lessons as you go. (And boy, did I make some mistakes over the years.). And a lot of times it takes listening to your instincts because nobody knows your child like you do!
                    For what it is worth, the thing that I did "right" in those early years was to encourage a love of learning. I really encouraged them to just LOVE reading and learning about science or history or art or nature. It is hard to explain just how to do this...but mainly I tried to get excited about the subjects myself! When I was excited about a subject, it would sort of spread like contagion around the house. lol I also read many books that I thought they would find interesting, and took them on a lot of field trips. Another thing I did was to give them plenty of opportunity to explore subjects that were of interest to them at a higher level. Every afternoon we would have a quiet time called "rest and reading". I kept a list of excellent audiobook ideas on subjects that I knew were of interest to them on Pinterest. (I used audiobooks because their reading level was much lower than their listening level. And I chose those subjects taht they tended to be slightly obsessed with!) I gave them an old iPhone and a list of audiobooks to listen to that I thought would benefit them. They listened to some very high level science, history, and biographies. They also listened to a lot of classic literature written for children. (The audiobooks also gave me a bit of time to rest too! I would drink a cup of tea and read my own books! Parents who have dyslexic children know how much we read aloud and a break is sometimes very nice.). Another thing that worked well in our situation was to work heavily on their academic weaknesses. And this is basically the opposite of the advice most people will give you about 2e children, but looking back, I have absolutely no regrets and I think I made the right choice. (So here is a lesson about listening to your instincts as a parent.). The physical act of writing and learning to read/spell were VERY difficult for my kids. So we spent probably 80-90% of our day working on phonics year after year after year. We worked very hard on writing too! ( strengthening their tiny little hand muscles, building endurance, doing some OT work, etc. ) It isn't like we slacked off in math---I just knew that learning to read and write are important skills---so we worked very hard to make progress in those areas which took a lot of time. I think a common mistake people make is to let "labels" become definitions of our children's limitations. We might say or think in our minds, "Oh, they have dyslexia, so learning to spell is impossible." or "They have ADHD, so learning to be still and pay attention is impossible for them." Yes, learning to spell is always going to be a huge challenge for a dyslexic child and they may never be great at it, but they can constantly make improvements at their own pace. Same thing with the act of attention: Learning to focus may never be easy for them, but they can work at it and make improvements. Anne Sullivan, who was the tutor of Hellen Keller, was always very inspiring to me as a homeschooling mother. Anne never let Helen's various challenges define her or become limitations for her. She never said, "Oh Helen is deaf, therefore she can never compose poetry or appreciate music." Instead she gave Helen opportunities for growth. We never consciously allow labels to define our children, but it can happen very easily.
                    Last edited by TheAttachedMama; 11-09-2020, 10:18 AM.
                    Cathy aka The Attached Mama
                    2019-2020
                    DS 12, 7th Grade
                    DD 11, 6th Grade
                    DS 5, K

                    Comment


                      #11
                      howiecram My daughter is in MP 2nd Grade.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Jessica Louise View Post
                        howiecram My daughter is in MP 2nd Grade.
                        You might consider keeping her in MP2, but switch to Simply Classical Level 3, enrichment. Have her read the books herself!
                        Christine

                        2020/2021)
                        DD1 8/23/09 - MP4 (Math 5)
                        DS2 9/1/11 - SC 5/6 2 year pace
                        DD3 2/9/13 -SC2/Storytime Treasures/AAR

                        Previous Years
                        DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3, SC4, SC 5/6
                        DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK, SC2/AAR/Storytime Treasures), Traditional Spelling 1
                        DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others, MPK, AAR)

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Jessica Louise View Post
                          I hate to ask this on a typical forum, but I don't know where else to ask other than here on the MP forum. How do you adapt your curriculum to your 2e child? I'm dealing with the stereotypical issues: handwriting is tough, she isn't ready to be jumped to another grade with more writing; The read-alouds are below her own reading level. Yes, there is a lot to be learned from the read-alouds, and we try to follow the plan as is, but I have to supplement with read-alouds that are much higher. There are other discrepancies, but if you have a 2e, you know what I mean. I am just wondering if anyone has suggestions for taking a 2e child through a "box" curriculum. Thanks in advance for the advise!!!
                          Keep in mind, too, that her reading level is likely far above her true emotional/maturity level. That seems to be the biggest challenge with 2e kids -- they can do more intellectually, but they're still little kids and you don't want to end up with material that's inappropriate for their emotional/developmental age.
                          Jennifer
                          Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

                          DS16: MP, MPOA, HSC, Breaking the Barrier French
                          DS15: MP, MPOA, HSC
                          DS12: Mash-up of 6/7M
                          DS11: SC 4
                          DD9: 3A with First Form Latin (long story!)
                          DD8: Mash-up of SC 1/2
                          DD5: January birthday, using SC B and C as a two-year JrK

                          Comment


                            #14
                            jen1134 Yes. Thank you!

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