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    How do they have short home school days?

    This is not aimed at any one person or curriculum, or even pedagogy, but how do people home school their kids in a couple of hours a day? I am not complaining in any way, I just don't see how they do it. One mom told me that kids end up in the same place regardless of the curriculum that you use....but I really have to wonder how that could possibly be true. Does anyone else find themselves NOT in the group of homeschools that are done by noon?

    #2
    We are DEFINITELY not done by noon, but that’s because we start our real group/bible studies at 10, take lunch and break at 11:30, do group reading around 1, boys tidy the dining room while I put toddler down for nap, and we start “real” school around 2:15. At 4:00/ 4:30 I start dinner while kids play outside and then we focus on reading, maybe flash cards before/during dessert. My 3rd grader reads aloud to me in the kitchen in evening while I do dishes.

    This is on purpose because outside and gardening is a high priority for our family. The weather will soon change, and that’s when our school days get longer.

    just what we do here...for now!
    -Victoria

    at home:
    boy - 3rd grade
    boy - 2nd grade
    boy - k/1st
    girl - toddler

    Comment


      #3
      There are SO many variables to this. The number of children, the studies you prioritize, how you teach those studies, your expectations for your student, your expectations for your day, what else you want to make time for....the list goes on and on.

      I will say that (barring a slow worker), a second grader shouldn’t need more than 2-3 hours a day, even with MP. Be sure you’re not trying to dot every i and cross every t — not even HLS does that. Teaching is an art, not a science, so don’t fret about knowing the perfect way to do each thing. Know the overall vision, do your best (not the same as perfect) and let God guide you. He will.
      Jennifer
      Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

      DS16: MP, MPOA, HSC, Breaking the Barrier French
      DS15: MP, MPOA, HSC
      DS12: Mash-up of 6/7M
      DS11: SC 4
      DD9: 3A with First Form Latin (long story!)
      DD8: Mash-up of SC 1/2
      DD5: January birthday, using SC B and C as a two-year JrK

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Jessica Louise View Post
        This is not aimed at any one person or curriculum, or even pedagogy, but how do people home school their kids in a couple of hours a day? I am not complaining in any way, I just don't see how they do it. One mom told me that kids end up in the same place regardless of the curriculum that you use....but I really have to wonder how that could possibly be true. Does anyone else find themselves NOT in the group of homeschools that are done by noon?
        First, as Jen mentioned, there are so many factors that play into how long your school day takes. Tulip gives a great example of how her family maintains a schedule that works for them based not only on their school plans, but also on additional things that are important for their family to make time to do. Our family does much the same...every day is a little different, but out of the necessity of trying to keep up with so many different people - teaching, checking, discussing...it's all gotta happen, but there are only so many minutes in the day. My day starts early, and finishes late. There is a lot of school in there. But I could not even break it down for you of a specific pattern because so many factors affect how each day goes. In this season of my life, I live according to the mantra, "What is the next right thing I could do?" and I try to do that until I finish or run out of time.

        Second, the point you included that I emphasized above is something that you are absolutely right to question. I have used the example in the past that if I want to get to Philadelphia, but I boarded a train for San Francisco, there is no way I would ever make it to Philadelphia. Not only will it simply not be possible, but it is actually the exact opposite direction from what I need to take. But we live in a world in which people want to think that all choices are equal, that their choices therefore do not have consequences, or that they should at least not be held responsible for those consequences (or some version of this modernist view). But it's all FALSE. You cannot make different choices and then expect the same outcome.

        The part that IS true is that there are many different choices in how people homeschool, and that people have the freedom to make the choices they want all along the way. But with different choices WILL come different outcomes, plain and simple. Children will grow and develop differently, they will be ready for different levels of opportunity, and they will be capable of different levels of challenge in life. But even more importantly, their capacity for making their own choices in life will be largely based upon what they have experienced during their educational years. That is the point at which the writing will be on the wall that says, "Yes, dear, there WAS a difference."

        AMDG,
        Sarah
        2020-2021
        16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
        DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
        DS, 16
        DD, 14
        DD, 12
        DD, 10
        DD, 8
        DD, 6
        +DS+
        DS, 2

        Comment


          #5
          I think there is actually a good bit of wisdom in your friend's observation that they all end up in the same place, because we are so much more than quiz grades and transcripts. Sometimes we fool ourselves that we can control the outcome by controlling the curriculum. It's like the saying, "Want to know how to make God laugh? Tell him your plans."

          How my family seeks education now is just what works for us, and what ties in with our interests. During the "here comes another baby" stage, there were long stretches of Latin and the three R's, with written work taking only a couple of hours.

          Blessings,
          Jude
          DD23
          DS20
          DS18
          DS16
          DD13
          DS11
          DD8

          Comment


            #6
            Two things can be true at the same time. You don't have to take the same amount of hours that away schools do. You also aren't doing needless work if it takes your own child (or you, due to life's interruptions) all day to meet all of the goals you set. Each child has her own intrinsic pacing that is difficult to speed up or slow down. As you become more confident in your teaching, you will get better at limiting needless interruptions, returning your child's focus to the material, and focusing on the meat of the assignment. Sometimes parents (especially creative ones), feel like they have to entertain every thought or rabbit trail question their children ask. This will dwindle down in time. Also, especially if you're only in the first few weeks, your child will get more efficient at her work. I remember in week 6 of our first year in MP, it took such an inordinate amount of time for my child to finish. The ink wasn't even dry on my complaint before she experienced a radical increase in speed, delight and performance. Second through third grade is a magical time of growth and transformation. It's harder when that child is your eldest and you've never gone through it before. Keep your chin up. Seeing the fruit is one of the truest delights.
            Mama to 2

            Summer:
            MPK with SC1 Phonics & Math
            SY 20/21
            4A

            Comment


              #7
              enbateau ,

              Just a small distinction that I think is important...two coordinating, or complementary, things can be true at the same time; but not two conflicting things. Right?

              AMDG,
              Sarah
              2020-2021
              16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
              DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
              DS, 16
              DD, 14
              DD, 12
              DD, 10
              DD, 8
              DD, 6
              +DS+
              DS, 2

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by KF2000 View Post
                enbateau ,

                Just a small distinction that I think is important...two coordinating, or complementary, things can be true at the same time; but not two conflicting things. Right?

                AMDG,
                Sarah
                It's a stylistic set up, not meant to tople norms. .


                With that said, I have not begun to tackle logic, so I had best avoid any arguments with the pros.

                Mama to 2

                Summer:
                MPK with SC1 Phonics & Math
                SY 20/21
                4A

                Comment


                  #9
                  Thank you, ladies!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    enbateau ,
                    Gotcha - just making sure!

                    AMDG,
                    Sarah
                    2020-2021
                    16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
                    DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
                    DS, 16
                    DD, 14
                    DD, 12
                    DD, 10
                    DD, 8
                    DD, 6
                    +DS+
                    DS, 2

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Not done by lunch. 🙋‍♀️ That ship sailed...a long time ago. I don't even remember when.
                      Festina lentē,
                      Jessica P

                      2020-2021
                      11th year HSing · 9th year MP
                      @ Home, HLN, & Latin online
                      11th, 9th, 6th, 3rd

                      Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Jessica Louise View Post
                        This is not aimed at any one person or curriculum, or even pedagogy, but how do people home school their kids in a couple of hours a day? I am not complaining in any way, I just don't see how they do it. One mom told me that kids end up in the same place regardless of the curriculum that you use....but I really have to wonder how that could possibly be true. Does anyone else find themselves NOT in the group of homeschools that are done by noon?
                        Yes, we are in this group! My kindergartener is finished with desk work in about 1 hour, then does enrichment activities and free play. But the other kids have math, spelling, grammar, literature, and Latin for "morning work"; then a play/lunch break; then composition, classical/geography/science/Christian studies, art, and music for "afternoon work." They (and I as teacher) finish around 3 most days. Then they go build leaf piles or whatever for the rest of the day till suppertime. It's fine. Maybe someone else would be more efficient. Maybe someone else would not be requiring as much. In our family's estimation, it's a reasonable amount of work for their ages and a solid selection of important material for them to be studying.

                        I'm only teaching through 7th grade right now, but I know and have known quite a few kids and families using different school settings and curricula. I must disagree with the idea that they all end up in the same place. Sure, they all grow up, but they don't all learn the same things or have the same abilities or character strengths, and curriculum and school choices DO affect those outcomes...along with lots of other factors, like innate ability and intelligence, influence of family and friends, and that darn free will :-).
                        DS 12 MP7
                        DD 10 MP5
                        DS 8 MP3
                        DD 5 MPK
                        DS 3
                        DS 3 months

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Isn't it wonderful to live in a time and place where there are so many curriculum choices and learning styles available? The abilities and strengths of the autodidact and the planned/scheduled student may indeed be different, just as the abilities and strengths of the severely developmentally disabled and the gifted child (we have both in our family) will be different. Thank goodness we aren't all ending up with the same content, because no matter what path you pick, you won't cover everything.

                          Kid A is on a traditional path, does his hours of daily work and dutifully studies his flashcards. Kid B is on that same traditional path, hates every minute of it, does as little as possible mainly to keep mom off his back, and wishes he could spend more time on what really interests him. Kid C zips through written work in two hours, has an innate ability for language acquisition, and spends hours a day reading on various subjects that interest him. Kid D tests at IQ 70, plateaus at a third grade level. Which one is guaranteed a better outcome?

                          Blessings,
                          Jude
                          DD23
                          DS20
                          DS18
                          DS16
                          DD13
                          DS11
                          DD8

                          Comment


                            #14
                            School is taking FOREVER around here. In fact, we are going to do some today (Saturday) just to catch up a bit. I am sometimes envious of the families that are done in three hours and get to spend the entire afternoon at the park or beach or whatever. But, we put in long solid school days and then take weeks and weekends at a time for camping. Knowing more now about my kids' strengths and abilities (in the midst of neuropsych testing) I am firmly in the camp of "persevere, work hard, gain confidence." A firm and solid and rigorous study of math, writing, and literature are very important to us--and those things take a prodigious amount of time, and then when you add in some variety and beauty with history, science, art, and a casual study of German...homeschooling is absolutely my full time job. Since my eldest is only 9, it is hard to see that it is absolutely worth it yet, though, kwim? Hence the forum as a source of inspiration!!!! I've drifted and dithered and flip flopped so long over curriculum (my poor husband lol) but I do see MP as being both what my kids need (even if they don't always enjoy it) and our most direct path to confidence.
                            Ora et Labora!
                            Emily

                            Beech Tree Boarding School, 2020-2021
                            DD (age 9): 4NU
                            DD (age 7): MP 1
                            DS (age 4): MP Jr. K
                            "I feel above me the day-blind stars waiting with their light. For a time, I rest in the grace of the world, and am free." Wendell Berry

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Upon further reflection, I think also, you make it work for you and your family, as SaintJude7 often reminds us to do! For instance, we aren't going to do Christian studies tests, but are keeping it more open and using it more for comprehension and discussion and mapwork--we are going to do that entire study guide orally. DD has already immersed herself in Greek Myths and adores them, so I just have her write out the comprehension question if she doesn't immediately know the answer. I don't worry about music for enrichment, as both girls take private music lessons and we put classical music on Pandora each day. And for my younger daughter, we are delaying spelling till second grade. Family and playtime and sports/athletics are still very important to us, and it's always such a balancing act.
                              Ora et Labora!
                              Emily

                              Beech Tree Boarding School, 2020-2021
                              DD (age 9): 4NU
                              DD (age 7): MP 1
                              DS (age 4): MP Jr. K
                              "I feel above me the day-blind stars waiting with their light. For a time, I rest in the grace of the world, and am free." Wendell Berry

                              Comment

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