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    Syllabication

    How do you explain syllabication to your student? How do you explain how to figure out how to parse a word into syllables? How do you know that you are doing it correctly without checking the dictionary? Thank you!

    #2
    There are rules that apply to how words are divided into syllables, which we learn in the phonics and spelling portions of the curriculum (specifically, First Start Reading and Traditional Spelling). If you need a guide to help you, this resource might prove useful:

    https://www.memoriapress.com/curricu...econd-edition/

    AMDG,
    Sarah
    2020-2021
    16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
    DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
    DS, 17
    DD, 15
    DD, 13
    DD, 11
    DD, 9
    DD, 7
    +DS+
    DS, 2

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      #3
      There are a few ways to determine this. The first one is to clap the "beats" of the word. If you were singing the word with one note per "beat," how many times would you clap? Hat? One. Candy? Two. Excellent? Three. Watermelon? Four. With these same words, if you have your child look in the mirror, s/he will see his/her mouth open the same amount of times as there are syllables. In another phonics path we used, they have you put your hand below your jaw and count how many times your chin hits your hand. But my favorite way to do this is to hum. Some kids do best with this, some will try to sound out a word in hums, so some modeling helps, but have them imagine their lips are sewn together. Hum the word and see how many distinct hums there are. Because my little guy has had 3 years of music class, the clapping/beats works best for him. My eldest liked the humming.

      Every syllable has a written vowel (silent or otherwise), and syllables end as open or closed vowels depending on their roots and spelling rules required to keep those vowels short or long. If your child is struggling with this in TSI or II, keep modeling it together and your child should catch on in time. FWIW, those with auditory processing disorder or language delay can struggle with this concept for quite some time before it clicks. If that is the case, stick to teaching it as a visual that you provide for your student, as it is not required for any test or quiz....I'm pretty sure not ever. If your child can memorize the spelling of the word without it, have her copy the answer and focus on the vowel and consonant teams/markings instead of being able to syllibicate on her own.
      Mama of 2, teacher of 3

      SY 21/22
      5A w/ SFL & CC Narrative class
      MP1

      Completed MPK, MP1 Math & Enrichment, MP2, 3A, 4A
      SC B, SC C, SC1 (Phonics/Math), SC2's Writing Book 1

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        #4
        "Jingle Bells" (if you do that holiday song) is a great example of a song where every word gets approximately one beat (minus "in a" of "in a one horse open sleigh"). If you have an electric keyboard and can play it for her (bungling around, even), it would be even better. My kids take piano, so it means even more for them to hear it played and sang. You can even have her make up her own songs to put into "Jingle Bells" to see how each syllable will fit into each beat in the song. Maybe that will click.
        Mama of 2, teacher of 3

        SY 21/22
        5A w/ SFL & CC Narrative class
        MP1

        Completed MPK, MP1 Math & Enrichment, MP2, 3A, 4A
        SC B, SC C, SC1 (Phonics/Math), SC2's Writing Book 1

        Comment


          #5
          Thank you both! I will get the book, and I will try having her use the 'Jingle Bells' song.

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