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    Interruptions

    My daughter has always been good about listening to anything read aloud. However, lately she has interrupted me so many times during reading that there is no way to follow the author's train of thought. I want to be kind and I want to answer relevant questions, but she seems to have regressed in this area. I am wondering if I can apply a general rule, such as you can only interrupt with questions about the book that we are currently reading or please do not speak until the end. This has not been necessary in the past, and I do not want to squelch her love of read-alouds, but I need to redirect this lack of focus. Does anyone have any ideas on how to correct this gently? Thank you!

    #2
    How old is she? (Close to turning an age?)

    AMDG,
    Sarah
    2020-2021
    16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
    DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
    DS, 16
    DD, 14
    DD, 12
    DD, 10
    DD, 8
    DD, 6
    +DS+
    DS, 2

    Comment


      #3
      I don't know if it helps, but when I read aloud with our littles - 8, 5, 2 - they can ask what a word a means or ask to repeat a sentence if they missed something. Other questions like why a character . . . etc. need to wait until the end of the chapter and we can discuss. With that in mind, I try hard to be sure at the end of a reading time (and sometimes a pause in the middle of a chapter if a lot is going on) to have time to discuss questions. It drives me bonkers to have a lot of interruptions while reading aloud, and this approach cut down on the interruptions.

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        #4
        KF2000 She is eight years old.

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          #5
          Amanda U Thank you. That sounds pretty good.

          Comment


            #6
            Ok, that’s what I figured. Here’s the thing. Kids at this age are making a transition from little-kid-land to grammar-age-land. It’s an amazing time. I have a current 8 year old who will be 9 in November. The change I have seen in her even from May (when we were finishing second grade) to now (when we started up the new school year) has been huge. She is so confident all of a sudden, so capable, and....so much better at understanding context. She draws conclusions now in a way that she couldn’t even a few months ago. It’s a big, big change - and it is why 9 is the perfect age to start grammar school.

            What this means in your case is that your daughter is probably thinking about what you are reading in a much different way than she did before. Allowing her to stop you, and ask her questions in the moment while it is fresh, is probably a good thing to accept for a while because you want to really encourage that level of attentiveness. She’s doing exactly what you want: being more of an active listener. Yes, it may mean that you have to adjust your expectation of how much reading you get through for a while, but it might mean a richer listening session for her.

            With that being said, I do also agree with Amanda that it is also good to set an expectation of waiting until a more natural break to ask questions....but that might be something to wait on right now. This is a stage, and it will not last forever. She probably will go back to not interrupting so much when she gets a bit more used to listening as actively as she is starting to do. But for now, it would be ok to embrace her questions, accept the stage, and then wait it out.

            It’s a bit like when a child first learns to ride their bike. They are wobbly and unsteady, they start and stop a lot, they want to practice every chance they get, etc. But once they finally get the hang of it, they are able to race along without trouble, and they don’t need to be out there practicing every second. They know they have it down, so they are content to do other activities, too.

            Or another comparison...remember the three year old stage of constant questions? Maddeningly levels of “Why? Why? Why?” Similar thing here.

            When she gets used to keeping these events and ideas in mind, she should be better able to wait a bit and not interrupt so much.

            Hths!
            AMDG,
            Sarah
            2020-2021
            16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
            DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
            DS, 16
            DD, 14
            DD, 12
            DD, 10
            DD, 8
            DD, 6
            +DS+
            DS, 2

            Comment


              #7
              I would allow the questions and plan to read it twice! She’s engaging with the material, I think that’s great for an 8 year old! As long my child doesn’t come up with a “what if” tangent that gets out of hand, I’m happy to hear them ask what words mean, make connections to prior events, ask for clarification, etc.

              Comment


                #8
                KF2000 and Nannette Jenkins Thank you very much! This has been incredibly helpful. I am accepting that we may read many fewer books this year. When I typed up this year's book list for our school records, I added only a few Louisa May Alcott Novels to the list of books that we will use with MP second grade. Of course we will read many more, but my goal will be to take the necessary time with these books. Everything else will be icing on the cake. Thank you, ladies, for helping me to slow down!

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