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    #16
    Originally posted by jen1134 View Post
    TWO HUNDRED mixed facts?! Before even starting the lesson?!. Am I really underestimating my kids or is that just...a lot?

    I had finally gotten back on board with R&S, but then watching the videos, especially that one, made me doubt everything again. My son will not write that much. I’ll continue to do flash cards and speed drills.

    Comment


      #17
      I've been thinking on this more...it appears they start doing 100 in 3rd grade, then 200 in 4th grade. By that point, a child who has been with R&S since the beginning would be fairly solid on those facts, so this sounds like it's simply a focus shift. A "let's see how quickly we can write what we already know" rather than a "learn these facts or die." In that respect, I could see where this could work, as it's just a continuation of what they've been studying for 2-3 years.

      I would still need to gauge it by child though; my 10yo would need a slow ramp up but could use the practice. My SN kiddos would definitely not be up for it...maybe my 11yo when his facts are more solid. As Ginger said, we would continue flash cards and maybe use the speed drill pages as warm-ups for them.

      tanya What do they do at HLS for kids who aren't able to handle this much?
      Jennifer
      Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

      DS16: MP, MPOA, HSC, Breaking the Barrier French
      DS15: MP, MPOA, HSC
      DS12: Mash-up of 6/7M
      DS11: SC 4
      DD9: 3A with First Form Latin (long story!)
      DD8: Mash-up of SC 1/2
      DD5: January birthday, using SC B and C as a two-year JrK

      Comment


        #18
        I’m just going to add in that starting off with 100 or 200 facts practice problems before each lesson seems like a pretty good way to make a gifted child hate math.

        Blessings,
        Jude

        Comment


          #19
          This conversation has me thinking it’s good to keep in mind that, again, it depends. I personally do not want to reach a conclusion without really giving my kids the chance to try - and perhaps thrive. They have certainly surprised me before, and I know they will again. And I am wondering if this approach might streamline things for all the different sorts of drilling we do, and if my kids wouldn’t therefore do better with this. The consistency of it would certainly help, and for that reason alone I am at least open to trying it.

          Several of us were just talking last evening, and another long-time MP user brought up the excellent point that the one thing she would change about her experience thus far would be to have been able to trust MP sooner in her homeschool career. I can attest that I was nodding along heartily the entire time she was speaking. I very often have thought I know better, or have been quick to question things - only to be hit over the head with a dose of humility as I realize that yes, once again, I have been wrong.

          So, I don’t see a harm in trying, evaluating, and moving toward a goal - all the while knowing that it is still up to me to know what is best for each one of my children and adjust accordingly.

          AMDG,
          Sarah

          2020-2021
          16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
          DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
          DS, 16
          DD, 14
          DD, 12
          DD, 10
          DD, 8
          DD, 6
          +DS+
          DS, 2

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by KF2000 View Post
            This conversation has me thinking it’s good to keep in mind that, again, it depends. I personally do not want to reach a conclusion without really giving my kids the chance to try - and perhaps thrive. They have certainly surprised me before, and I know they will again. And I am wondering if this approach might streamline things for all the different sorts of drilling we do, and if my kids wouldn’t therefore do better with this. The consistency of it would certainly help, and for that reason alone I am at least open to trying it.

            Several of us were just talking last evening, and another long-time MP user brought up the excellent point that the one thing she would change about her experience thus far would be to have been able to trust MP sooner in her homeschool career. I can attest that I was nodding along heartily the entire time she was speaking. I very often have thought I know better, or have been quick to question things - only to be hit over the head with a dose of humility as I realize that yes, once again, I have been wrong.

            So, I don’t see a harm in trying, evaluating, and moving toward a goal - all the while knowing that it is still up to me to know what is best for each one of my children and adjust accordingly.

            AMDG,
            Sarah
            Yes! This is so very true. I didn't mean to start a negative tone here; I was honestly asking because 1) it took me by surprise and 2) I have a tendency to think something is too hard for my kids when it ends up being exactly what they needed all along!

            Sarah, when you mentioned that this could streamline drills, it reminded me of something my son said right before we went on break: "Can I do a blackline instead? I can't think clearly when we do flashcards." So maybe this method would be perfect for him after all!
            Jennifer
            Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

            DS16: MP, MPOA, HSC, Breaking the Barrier French
            DS15: MP, MPOA, HSC
            DS12: Mash-up of 6/7M
            DS11: SC 4
            DD9: 3A with First Form Latin (long story!)
            DD8: Mash-up of SC 1/2
            DD5: January birthday, using SC B and C as a two-year JrK

            Comment


              #21
              Let me tell you the story of HLS and morning math last year. We decided to try it, and everyone was nervous. We started kindergarten with just a little dictation until they learned some math facts (write a 0, write a 1). Our main goal for K was that they learn to record their time. We weren't really keeping up with it, but we wanted them to practice. We got large red timers that were magnetized so they stuck to the whiteboards. We started the timers at 20 mins. Then, when the kids finished their "morning work," they were to record their time. At first, they would look up, write the first number down, and by the time they looked up again, of course, time had passed, so they wrote whatever the seconds said at that time. Then, when they were comfortable, we started telling them to try to see the entire number, remember it, and write it down. We even had them put the colon on their papers before we started. So it was a slow process that eventually worked up to 50 problems which they averaged at 3 1/2 mins. by the end of the school year. This was way beyond our expectations. We were thrilled, and so were they. First grade started with 50 problems (they also had 20 mins) and ended the year with 200, which they could do in less than 10 mins. We had to ramp 1st grade up faster than we anticipated because the students kept blowing through our expectations. Second grade started with 50 also, but they moved faster to 200 problems. Their avg. time at the end of the year was 200 problems in 8 mins. 30 sec. for the mixed drills. We did sprinkle in mixed drills, but we were very deliberate about how we introduced them.

              The students loved doing their morning math. Part of that is because our teachers did a great job of being excited about it and presenting it in a no pressure way. Part of it is just that it gave students an opportunity to show what they could do and to continue getting faster and faster, which was an accomplishment for them. So maybe it isn't for everyone, and that's okay. But we loved it, our students loved it, our teachers loved it, and our administration loved it. So it was a win!

              We are formatting it so that it will gradually get harder throughout the year, just like we did it in our classrooms (with the changes we made throughout the year as we had to speed things up). So there are lots of timed drills to choose from. And you can redo them if you aren't ready to move your student forward as quickly as we did. I'm anxious to see how the homeschool market does with it, so let us know!

              Tanya

              Comment


                #22
                Thank you, Tanya! I love the scaffolded approach to this.
                Jennifer
                Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

                DS16: MP, MPOA, HSC, Breaking the Barrier French
                DS15: MP, MPOA, HSC
                DS12: Mash-up of 6/7M
                DS11: SC 4
                DD9: 3A with First Form Latin (long story!)
                DD8: Mash-up of SC 1/2
                DD5: January birthday, using SC B and C as a two-year JrK

                Comment


                  #23
                  While I am very glad that we discovered MP early on, I am equally happy that we knew when to modify according to what worked for our family. I have spoken to moms who have been scared away from using MP, because the vibe they got from the forum was "Do it the MP way" or "Do it the HLS way." None of this is holy writ. We each take what we need from the Memoria Press offerings and adapt it to our situation. 100-200 practice problems might work for your child. Or flash cards. Or maybe you have a gifted kid who doesn't need either. Maybe you have kids who drilled their math facts via board games or card games. You are the best judge of what works for your family. Tweak away.

                  Blessings,
                  Jude

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by SaintJude7 View Post
                    While I am very glad that we discovered MP early on, I am equally happy that we knew when to modify according to what worked for our family. I have spoken to moms who have been scared away from using MP, because the vibe they got from the forum was "Do it the MP way" or "Do it the HLS way." None of this is holy writ. We each take what we need from the Memoria Press offerings and adapt it to our situation. 100-200 practice problems might work for your child. Or flash cards. Or maybe you have a gifted kid who doesn't need either. Maybe you have kids who drilled their math facts via board games or card games. You are the best judge of what works for your family. Tweak away.

                    Blessings,
                    Jude
                    Thanks for this Jude! We discovered MP early (before the cores) and the times I tried to do it all were not necessarily the best years ever. Part of me would love for my children to attend HLS - we might not have chosen homeschooling if that were available- but we don’t, and there is no way to recreate it at home in a multiage homeschool. There are many advantages to having an established school with a group of like minded children together with dedicated teachers, but there are many things homeschools can do that I want to take advantage of since that is where I have been called to teach. Bloom where you are planted and teach the kids in front of you. I am thankful that MP shares so many of their great resources with us, it is truly a blessing. I believe my kids are receiving a great classical education And so far Tanya has not revoked my MP card for using their materials my way.

                    Back to math...I have no desire to change Rod and Staff. It is a solid elementary curriculum that HLS has been able to use in their school without feeling the need to write their own curriculum. It is, however, far from the only curriculum out there, and I believe that I could make it work in the home setting more easily than something like Saxon. Others love Saxon and will disagree and that is OK as long as they do math (almost) every day. Math needs to be completed and I wouldn’t switch because they made mistakes on their tests if you are comfortable with the program. Kids do end up in a pickle when mom changes math curriculum too often so that would be my last choice. It sounds like they are most likely doing pretty well. You practice the skills you want to develop and writing 200 math facts every morning develops the skill of writing math facts very quickly. My kids would hate it and that isn’t my goal for math or the hill I want to die on so we use a mix of short written practice, games, online drill and my middle/high school kids know their facts while never having completed a page of 200 facts before their math lesson.
                    Dorinda

                    For 2019-2020
                    DD 16 - 11th with MPOA(AP Latin), Lukeion (Greek4 & Adv. NT Greek), Thinkwell (Economics and Chemistry), plus Pre-Calculus, American G’ment, Early Church History set, and British Lit
                    DS 14 - 8th with MPOA(Fourth Form), CLRC(Intro Lit and Comp), plus Algebra, Field Biology, Classical Studies 1
                    DS 11 - 6th with Right Start Level G online class
                    DS 6 - 1st with Prima Latina

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Where do the 200 fact sheets come from? I need to watch these math videos.
                      ~Tiffany

                      DD12, DS11, DD8, DD5, DD4

                      Comment


                        #26
                        CherryBlossomMJ

                        FWIW, one of my boys was like this — regardless of the math curriculum we used. He's now almost 16, a great student, and still has this problem. He just has a hard time paying attention to details. When he looks over an incorrect problem he'll often smack his head and say "I can't believe I did that!" It's been this way his whole life -- through four different math curriculums. It's his tendency to mental distraction/overlooking details, not his understanding of the concepts.

                        A few things that can help:
                        • Using grid paper to work the problems. This will keep everything lined up and make errors less likely UNLESS they're like my son and tend to copy the problems incorrectly to begin with.
                        • Marking problems with visual cues: they use one color highlighter over addition signs, different color over subtraction, multiplication, etc. They should be responsible for the marking, not you, as it will train their eye/attention to detail
                        • Have a process sheet they can refer to when working carrying, borrowing, and long division problems.
                        • Have a "keyword" sheet to reference for word problems (which operation to use with which type of keyword/question); just continue to drill these so the sheet becomes unnecessary
                        • Train them to check their work: "Does 7 make sense if I'm trying to answer 4 TAKE AWAY 2?"
                        Do you think these would help?
                        Jennifer
                        Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

                        DS16: MP, MPOA, HSC, Breaking the Barrier French
                        DS15: MP, MPOA, HSC
                        DS12: Mash-up of 6/7M
                        DS11: SC 4
                        DD9: 3A with First Form Latin (long story!)
                        DD8: Mash-up of SC 1/2
                        DD5: January birthday, using SC B and C as a two-year JrK

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by BearWallowSchool View Post
                          Where do the 200 fact sheets come from? I need to watch these math videos.
                          They are still being published for the homeschool market. So, they are not available yet. However, in the 3rd and 4th grade, there are backlines that have pages of 100 facts. You could just put two front to back and that would be 200 facts. I think there is a some method though, so you need the problems to be very "easy" to begin and shouldn't be from the family you are just learning, etc. So, in 3rd grade you could start with the 1-10 facts. Then add in the 11-18, etc. In 2nd grade you could start with 1-5 facts, then build up to 1-10...slowly adding as the year goes on the 11s, 12s, etc.
                          Christine

                          (2019/2020)
                          DD1 8/23/09 - SC5/6
                          DS2 9/1/11 - SC3,4, 5/6 combo
                          DD3 2/9/13 -SC2 to start, MP1 second semester

                          Previous Years
                          DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3, SC4’
                          DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK, SC2)
                          DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others, MPK)

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Originally posted by MBentley View Post
                            I have had a complete revamp of how I will do Math after watching the Sodalitas conference for the math grades I'm teaching. They do things that I never did, and spent time on things it wouldn't have occurred to me were so important. We were doing pretty good, but this was next level guidance. Those videos are still available.
                            Melissa, have you seen these videos on the MP site yet? I took a quick look but couldn't find anything.
                            Anne

                            2020/2021
                            DD 8 - 3M with Prima Latina
                            DD 6 - MP core 1st grade
                            DS 4 - along for the ride

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by Anne E View Post

                              Melissa, have you seen these videos on the MP site yet? I took a quick look but couldn't find anything.
                              These are the 2019 videos. I am finding them extremely helpful! https://www.memoriapress.com/streami...hering-videos/
                              Ora et Labora!
                              Emily

                              Beech Tree Boarding School, 2020-2021
                              DD (age 9): 4NU
                              DD (age 7): MP 1
                              DS (age 4): MP Jr. K
                              "I feel above me the day-blind stars waiting with their light. For a time, I rest in the grace of the world, and am free." Wendell Berry

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