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    3rd-7th Content Subjects

    For 3rd-7th graders who are independent and good readers...
    I'd like my children to read the lesson, do a selection of comprehension questions, then at a later time in the day discuss the lesson with me.

    My only hold up is the reading notes and vocab. Last year I had them wait and go over those things with me first, then do the independent part, then discuss later. I feel like that's a lot of back and forth, and they have to wait for me twice for the same subject.

    So how would you all break up the lesson?
    ~ Carrie
    Catholic mom to four - ages 11, 9, 7, and 5
    8th year homeschooling, 3rd year MP!
    2020-2021: 6M with FFL, 4M with FFL, and some of 1st grade

    #2
    I’m going to be honest and admit (no, not quite admit, because it’s not necessarily a negative) that I do not do the Discussion Questions with my children. Ever. (Also, I rarely do tests or quizzes. Or recitation. Oddly enough, they are still voracious readers and well-educated.) I assign the Discussion Questions as short essay questions when applicable. Discussions about these subjects DO happen in our home, but they occur more naturally. If it isn’t with me, then it among the children. Maybe they aren’t always on the deepest levels. (A little piece of me dies when I hear comparisons of literature or history to Marvel or DC, but I let it slide. They are just as likely to bring up the Bible, Chesterton, Tolkien, Lewis, etc...)

    I don’t break up the lesson. I just assign it. They all know that a lesson will probably go faster if they do the Reading Notes and Vocabulary first. Whether they put that into practice is up to them. I look at my job as providing them with the best resources, a routine time, a routine place, and a not-suffocating amount of oversight. We’re not exactly the MP model family, but for us it works.

    Blessings,
    Jude
    DD24
    DS21
    DS18
    DS16
    DD14
    DS11
    DD9

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      #3
      The MP3 guide often broke it up as notes and vocab, then read on Day 1. Day 2, complete comprehension questions and discussion questions. I had my child stick post-it flags at the paragraph that answered the questions. She numbered them corresponding to the questions in the guide, so on day 2 she could just open her book and try to write a concise answer to the question.

      I'm not saying I haven't handed a guide to my student to complete and go over later, but by and large we went over answers together in 3rd, even for my strong reader and writer.
      Mama to 2

      Spring start MP1
      Summer start 5A

      Completed MPK, MP1 Math & Enrichment, MP2, 3A, 4A, SC B, SC C,
      SC1 (Phonics/Math), SC2's Writing Book 1

      Comment


        #4
        After I go over their work for one lesson and do the discussion question, we jump to the next lesson and do the notes and vocabulary at that time. Then the next day (or week for weekly subjects) they read and do the comp question before we meet to go over their work and do discussion and do the next lesson’s notes and vocabulary and on and on. So one day looks like: child read, child do question, we meet and go over question, we do discussion, we do next lesson notes and vocabulary.
        Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
        DD, 26, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
        DS, 24, BS '18 mechanical engineering
        DS, 22, BS '20 Chemsitry, pursuing phd at Wash U
        (DDIL married #3 in 2020, MPOA grad, BA '20 philosophy, pusrsing phd at SLU)
        DS, 20, Physics major
        DD, 17, dyslexic, 11th grade customizednMP plus co-op
        DS, 13, future engineer/scientist/ world conquerer 8A
        DD, 7 , 1ST Future astronaut, robot building space artist

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          #5
          For my kids that are very experienced with MP, and are strong readers....they do all that they can within their work time. Anything they do not know, they leave blank, and we work on that together when I meet with them. I do want them doing reading notes and vocabulary before they read (as it is intended), so if I made them wait for me to do that with them, it would hold up the whole process of getting to the actual lesson. They use a dictionary for the vocabulary they do not know, and when we go over the lesson, I make sure what they have written is the correct understanding of the word. If it is a really hard word, I make sure to give them the answer so they will study it correctly for the test.

          AMDG,
          Sarah
          2020-2021
          16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
          DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
          DS, 17
          DD, 15
          DD, 13
          DD, 11
          DD, 9
          DD, 7
          +DS+
          DS, 2

          Comment


            #6
            A conference talk host had a clever suggestion re: vocabulary. Since some words can have more than one meaning, but only one applies to whatever lesson the child is working on, this mother said she prepares ahead of time a Word doc with lists of vocabulary words from the lessons, with just the definition that applies: she prints the lists for the lessons needed that week, and the child can simply copy the definitions into his student book (or notebook). This is a creative way to achieve working with mom (through her prep work), but independently.
            DS (15)
            DD (14)
            DS (7)

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Mrs Bee View Post
              A conference talk host had a clever suggestion re: vocabulary. Since some words can have more than one meaning, but only one applies to whatever lesson the child is working on, this mother said she prepares ahead of time a Word doc with lists of vocabulary words from the lessons, with just the definition that applies: she prints the lists for the lessons needed that week, and the child can simply copy the definitions into his student book (or notebook). This is a creative way to achieve working with mom (through her prep work), but independently.
              Many of those are already made and linked in this thread: https://forum.memoriapress.com/forum...-and-classical
              Amanda - Mama to three crazy boys, teacher at St. Dominic Latin (FFL, TFL, 4FL, Traditional Logic 1&2), Memoria College student

              2021-2022
              9th grade - a mix of MPOA, Vita Beata, Lukeion, and AOPS
              8th grade - 8M with modifications
              4th grade - 4A

              "Non nisi te, Domine. Non nisi te" - St. Thomas Aquinas

              Comment


                #8
                Thanks everyone! I'll let them do the Reading Notes and Vocab on their own as long as it works. Then we'll go over pronunciation when we do the discussion questions.

                For the Vocab, I've been typing and mixing up the answers to have them "match" with the vocab word. Add a list of the words themselves for that quiz section and you've got a great review tool!
                ~ Carrie
                Catholic mom to four - ages 11, 9, 7, and 5
                8th year homeschooling, 3rd year MP!
                2020-2021: 6M with FFL, 4M with FFL, and some of 1st grade

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