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    R&S Arithmetic 4 & new to MP questions

    We are new to MP this year and new homeschoolers overall. I am looking through the Math lessons and trying to figure out a couple of things. First, do most of you have your student write in the hardcover student books? Second, If the lessons has the student doing the fact drills at the back of the book, do you alsohalso them do the additional blacklines drills or do you pick one. We are starting with Grade 4 with pretty much everything, but he would have been grade 5 if he had continued at his school. I chose to have him redo 4 because I thought it was a great starting point for MP and would fill in a few gaps he has. He probably could move up to R&S Arithmetic 5 easily, but I would like to keep him in a single core if possible, if that makes sense.
    Since I am new, I am just trying to wrap my head around what would work best for us. I am starting him at Traditional Spelling 1 and going to work through Classical phonics with him as well since he has only had the Sight Word approach to reading and spelling and is very weak there. I hope I am not going to overwhelm him with the regular curriculum plus the extra to catch up! Has anyone else started an older kid a grade behind what they would have been at schooland we're they able to catch up okay?

    #2
    Disclaimer: I haven’t taught 4th yet.
    We will not be writing in the student math book(transitioned in 3rd). However other families do write in the student books, though I don’t recall at what point there isn’t enough room.
    Typically around here, at least through 3rd, blacklines have been used for non lesson school days, or when extra practice is needed. What will happen when we hit 4th and they are in the student book instead of separate, I haven’t decided yet. However, unless more practice is needed we will probably continue to use them sparingly.

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      #3
      Sonja,
      Hello and welcome!
      Yes, you are correct in that most people have their kids write in the 3rd grade hardback book, but not so much after that. By 4th grade there is a lot less room, some lesson more so than others. And kids are usually better by that point at being able to transfer the problems into a notebook. One thing many parents do is have them write their math work in a quadrille notebook...it really helps them keep their place values lined up correctly.

      As for your other notes about where you are starting your son, I think your plans sound great. Addressing the lack of phonics work will be really helpful, and what you have chosen for that sounds like a great place to start. Make sure to come back to ask for help as the year goes along if you do not start to see the progress you would think is appropriate or if you need more ideas of how to help him.

      And I believe what you are referring to is the Fourth Grade for New Users set...which is a prefect place for a child of this age to start. MP does expect a lot, and can feel a bit advanced, especially for a child coming from a school situation. And having him switch out a level of math is not a problem at all. Rod and Staff has placement tests, I have heard, so if you look for those online, that can help you know where to begin. But really, their books are so inexpensive, that you could get the 4th grade book to check his understanding of those concepts and make sure he does not have any gaps before starting the 5th grade book. Usually what folks do is have a child take the chapter tests; if he does well on those, then they keep going to the next chapter test. Anytime a child does not score well on a specific chapter test, then they work through the lessons of that chapter to remediate. It can be an efficient way to bring a child up to grade level in the series without spending a whole year on the book.

      You are definitely not alone in having a child start around this age - or even later! Classical education is something everyone can take part in. The key point is to find out where your child is in each content area and begin there. Then keep making progress. That's it. It sounds like you have a good handle on where your son needs to be placed...so now you just need to begin! Again...welcome!

      AMDG,
      Sarah
      2020-2021
      16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
      DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
      DS, 16
      DD, 14
      DD, 12
      DD, 10
      DD, 8
      DD, 6
      +DS+
      DS, 2

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Sonja View Post
        We are new to MP this year and new homeschoolers overall. I am looking through the Math lessons and trying to figure out a couple of things. First, do most of you have your student write in the hardcover student books? Second, If the lessons has the student doing the fact drills at the back of the book, do you alsohalso them do the additional blacklines drills or do you pick one. We are starting with Grade 4 with pretty much everything, but he would have been grade 5 if he had continued at his school. I chose to have him redo 4 because I thought it was a great starting point for MP and would fill in a few gaps he has. He probably could move up to R&S Arithmetic 5 easily, but I would like to keep him in a single core if possible, if that makes sense.
        Since I am new, I am just trying to wrap my head around what would work best for us. I am starting him at Traditional Spelling 1 and going to work through Classical phonics with him as well since he has only had the Sight Word approach to reading and spelling and is very weak there. I hope I am not going to overwhelm him with the regular curriculum plus the extra to catch up! Has anyone else started an older kid a grade behind what they would have been at schooland we're they able to catch up okay?
        Hi Sonja! Welcome to homeschooling! ❤
        While we've homeschooled for over 10 years, we moved to MP cores a few years ago. I started one of my children in the 4th New Users core, just as you did. I also started her in Traditional Spelling while using Classical phonics because she basically taught herself to read without using phonics. Because I didn't understand I needed to teach her phonics for spelling, that became a very weak area. Hence the Traditional Spelling. I am so glad we started there, as her spelling has greatly improved! She's now moved on into Spelling Workout. I think you'll be very happy you chose to teach phonics, so be encouraged!

        I have my children write their math on graph paper since that helps with alignment and spacing. We don't write in the books at all.

        This same child started MP a little behind in math, so we breezed through the end of R&S Math Grade 3 and then headed to Grade 4. She needed to solidify her math facts before we could move on in math, and that was just the right thing for her.

        So to answer your question: yes, I have had an older child (4th grade) that worked quite a bit at the 3rd grade level. We took it slow and she's caught up beautifully.

        Best wishes as you start homeschooling!
        Lauren
        Mama to 5 Sweet Ones

        2020-2021:
        10th grade DS: Mix of MP materials, MPOA, and local classes
        8th grade DD: 8M and 3rd Form with MPOA
        6th grade DD: Mostly 6M
        4th Grade DD: Mostly 4NU
        3.5 yo DS: Copious amounts of time outside beating on things with sticks; MP Preschool and Mom Extras 2-3 days a week

        Comment


          #5
          Hello.

          At HLS, we use the 3rd grade math book as consumable, and after that, we have students copy their problems onto graph paper. In 4th grade, there isn't sufficient room in the book to complete the problems. We have moved into multi-step multiplication, fractions, and other types of problems that require good room for accurate work. I did ask R&S if I could create a workbook of the 4th grade problems so our students could transition more slowly, but they wouldn't grant me permission. So we have a hard line between using the books as consumable and having to transition to paper. It works out fine for most students. We do have a few who struggle with it though, which is why we wanted to have an optional workbook available.

          Tanya

          Comment


            #6
            Can somebody please link some graph paper that you recommend? I have some, but it's college ruled and that's just not going to work this next year. How do you find big enough boxes for this grade level? Thanks!
            Married to DH for 14 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

            DS11- Simply Classical 5/6
            DD9- Simply Classical 5/6 (neurotypical, but schooling with big brother to save mom's sanity)
            DD 6- Classic Core First Grade

            We've completed:
            Classic Core Jr. kindergarten, kindergarten, first grade, and second grade.
            Simply Classical levels B, C, 1, 2, 3, and 4.

            Comment


              #7
              I made my own graph paper for R&S 3, but my child quickly transitioned to the open line (one month or two). You can take a piece of notebook filler paper and draw perpendicular lines in red with a ruler, then photocopy it. I never found graph paper that was large enough, light enough in color, or most importantly, cheap enough. For $12-25, it just wasn't worth the cost. I never let my child write in the book, but a few times she was able to place her paper over the division problems and write just the answer. She started copying the entire problem, but as her accuracy improved, we moved to just writing the answer and using her finger to keep track of the problem she was on. For the multi-digit addition, subtraction, multiplication and division with remainders, she had to copy each problem first, then solve them. As I went over her work each afternoon, I circled each incorrect answer, and she had to figure out if she had a copy error or arithmetic error. Even though her attention to detail is still emerging, she almost never copied more than 1 or 2 incorrectly. Having to rewrite anything she got wrong was disincentive enough. I am glad we did this, because she'll be way ahead of the curve as we roll into R&S 4, having the writing stamina to copy a large bulk of problems, and almost a year of near-point copy work. R&S has a lot of verbal helps for keeping the columns neat and "erec-t." I told her that in the more advanced levels of math, the whole problem will be wrong if she copies it wrong, no matter how good her arithmetic is. I drilled and drilled and drilled: copy correctly.
              Mama to 2

              Summer:
              MPK with SC1 Phonics & Math
              SY 20/21
              4A

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