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Cutting back to essentials: Classical Studies or Literature?

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    #31
    I took advice last year during the planning process for this year, and glad I did or we would have been overwhelmed with reading. We did BOAG and BOAW in the fall and chose two literature guides (Treasure Island and Tom Sawyer - I have two boys so these worked for us). BOAG we did the tests and such. BOAW we just read and discussed. We did the full literature guides. In the spring semester, we ditched literature because Iliad / Odyssey was all we could handle, and after all, those are literature as well. I counted them as Classical Studies on their transcripts, but they could really be counted as either CS or literature. We read one or two chapters at a time of the Iliad / Odyssey then watched the videos and filled out the questions in the book / discussed. I honestly only assigned one essay for each of those books. They took all the quizzes and tests. This spring semester we also did the 200 questions on American History, just read the text and filled out the questions to memorize. (Noting that both of my kids are in an MPOA composition class, so we are not behind in that because they have to keep up with assignment dates.)
    Nicole - mom - Doctor of Pharmacy, UMKC 2002, M.S. Bioethics, 2020, Univ. of Mary.
    2021-2022 - 5th year homeschooling and with MP
    DS - 8th, 14 yo
    DS - 8th, 13 yo

    Comment


      #32
      Nicole, I'm so glad you shared this. I love hearing how families mix and match options to craft great years of work.
      Festina lentē,
      Jessica P

      '22-'23 • 13th year HSing • 11th year MP
      DS Hillsdale College freshman
      DD 11th • HLN & Latin online
      DD 8th • HLN & Home
      DS 5th • HLN & Home
      Me • Memoria College, MPOA Fourth Form for Adults

      Teaching Third Form Latin and co-directing @
      Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School, est. 2016

      Comment


        #33
        Originally posted by pickandgrin View Post

        I spent countless Sunday nights creating "duplicate and customized" plans for my kids for several years before simply buying the CM and releasing THEM to use them as their plans, not mine.[/I]
        Thank you, Jessica, these are great ideas and great encouragement for the long view. As for the line I quoted above - so glad it's not just me!

        Monica
        Monica
        2021-2022
        S - 15
        S - 13

        Comment


          #34
          Originally posted by Nikkirxd View Post
          I took advice last year during the planning process for this year, and glad I did or we would have been overwhelmed with reading. We did BOAG and BOAW in the fall and chose two literature guides (Treasure Island and Tom Sawyer - I have two boys so these worked for us). BOAG we did the tests and such. BOAW we just read and discussed. We did the full literature guides. In the spring semester, we ditched literature because Iliad / Odyssey was all we could handle, and after all, those are literature as well. I counted them as Classical Studies on their transcripts, but they could really be counted as either CS or literature. We read one or two chapters at a time of the Iliad / Odyssey then watched the videos and filled out the questions in the book / discussed. I honestly only assigned one essay for each of those books. They took all the quizzes and tests. This spring semester we also did the 200 questions on American History, just read the text and filled out the questions to memorize. (Noting that both of my kids are in an MPOA composition class, so we are not behind in that because they have to keep up with assignment dates.)
          Thank you, Nicole. I really appreciate seeing the different ways families organize. It has been so helpful these past three years to see the variety as it allows me to imagine different possibilities at my home.
          Monica
          Monica
          2021-2022
          S - 15
          S - 13

          Comment


            #35
            Originally posted by Nikkirxd View Post
            I took advice last year during the planning process for this year, and glad I did or we would have been overwhelmed with reading. We did BOAG and BOAW in the fall and chose two literature guides (Treasure Island and Tom Sawyer - I have two boys so these worked for us). BOAG we did the tests and such. BOAW we just read and discussed. We did the full literature guides. In the spring semester, we ditched literature because Iliad / Odyssey was all we could handle, and after all, those are literature as well. I counted them as Classical Studies on their transcripts, but they could really be counted as either CS or literature. We read one or two chapters at a time of the Iliad / Odyssey then watched the videos and filled out the questions in the book / discussed. I honestly only assigned one essay for each of those books. They took all the quizzes and tests. This spring semester we also did the 200 questions on American History, just read the text and filled out the questions to memorize. (Noting that both of my kids are in an MPOA composition class, so we are not behind in that because they have to keep up with assignment dates.)
            Nicole,
            I'm just wondering how it works with your two boys so close in age. Do you keep them in the same grade level? Have they been working together since you started MP? Did you do the FMOG last year with them together? My boys are grades 7&8 (I need to take some time figure out a signature) and lately the tension has been difficult, but I am pondering ways to bring them back together. I'm always interested to learn how families of similar ages make things work.
            Monica
            Monica
            2021-2022
            S - 15
            S - 13

            Comment


              #36
              Originally posted by KikaMarie View Post

              Nicole,
              I'm just wondering how it works with your two boys so close in age. Do you keep them in the same grade level? Have they been working together since you started MP? Did you do the FMOG last year with them together? My boys are grades 7&8 (I need to take some time figure out a signature) and lately the tension has been difficult, but I am pondering ways to bring them back together. I'm always interested to learn how families of similar ages make things work.
              Monica
              Well, sometimes it "works," and sometimes it doesn't... We pulled them out of a parish school beginning in grades 3 and 4. To make it easier on myself, I did everything together that I could. At first I kept literature, math and composition separate. However, as they have grown older, we now have literature combined, so only math and comp are on different levels. They are VERY different kids. The older one loves Latin and is really good at it, but despises science. The younger one is a science genius, but hates Latin. Also, the older one is a slow processor. It takes him much longer to do the same work as the younger one (except Latin... those are opposite). However, the younger one can sometimes be slip shod in his work. Sometimes I think that we should separate them more so that there is not so much competition, but we try to use these differences as teaching points, noting that God gives each his own talents to develop. It doesn't make you a better or worse student than the other brother, but just different natural skills. The interesting thing is that, this year, the older one has kind-of instinctively taken over the roll of helping the younger one study for his Latin quizzes and such. I've pretty much always brought the younger one "up" a level to get them on the same year with the subjects we share. The problem with this is that if I don't hold him back, the younger one will end up graduating high school a year early, with his brother. I'm not really sure if that is good or bad, but if it happens, then it happens. I don't think I really planned it all out this way. It just happened. When I talk to my husband about trying to separate them, he says that if it won't make that much difference in their overall education, then do whatever is easiest for me. One good thing is that, since they are reading the same things at the same time, we have interesting dinner table discussions about whatever the current topic is. (Recently, my husband mentioned the name "Helen of Troy," and the boys began a debate as to whether she was "of Troy" or "of Greece".
              Nicole - mom - Doctor of Pharmacy, UMKC 2002, M.S. Bioethics, 2020, Univ. of Mary.
              2021-2022 - 5th year homeschooling and with MP
              DS - 8th, 14 yo
              DS - 8th, 13 yo

              Comment


                #37
                Originally posted by Nikkirxd View Post

                Well, sometimes it "works," and sometimes it doesn't... We pulled them out of a parish school beginning in grades 3 and 4. To make it easier on myself, I did everything together that I could. At first I kept literature, math and composition separate. However, as they have grown older, we now have literature combined, so only math and comp are on different levels. They are VERY different kids. The older one loves Latin and is really good at it, but despises science. The younger one is a science genius, but hates Latin. Also, the older one is a slow processor. It takes him much longer to do the same work as the younger one (except Latin... those are opposite). However, the younger one can sometimes be slip shod in his work. Sometimes I think that we should separate them more so that there is not so much competition, but we try to use these differences as teaching points, noting that God gives each his own talents to develop. It doesn't make you a better or worse student than the other brother, but just different natural skills. The interesting thing is that, this year, the older one has kind-of instinctively taken over the roll of helping the younger one study for his Latin quizzes and such. I've pretty much always brought the younger one "up" a level to get them on the same year with the subjects we share. The problem with this is that if I don't hold him back, the younger one will end up graduating high school a year early, with his brother. I'm not really sure if that is good or bad, but if it happens, then it happens. I don't think I really planned it all out this way. It just happened. When I talk to my husband about trying to separate them, he says that if it won't make that much difference in their overall education, then do whatever is easiest for me. One good thing is that, since they are reading the same things at the same time, we have interesting dinner table discussions about whatever the current topic is. (Recently, my husband mentioned the name "Helen of Troy," and the boys began a debate as to whether she was "of Troy" or "of Greece".
                Wow, Nicole, your descriptions of your sons is uncannily similar to my sons - my elder has really owned his Latin and dislikes science. My younger is a science lover and material in general come more easily to him, but he can be slip shod in his work. I've come to see this differences as you do, neither better than the other, but each of us with strengths and challenges we have to navigate in life. In past years we were reading the same books at the same time and I loved how our conversations were so connected as we went through our days, but this year I have more separation and I really miss that connection when only one son can recognize the allusion to something. Thanks for sharing this perspective.
                Monica
                Monica
                2021-2022
                S - 15
                S - 13

                Comment

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