Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A Greek Focus

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    A Greek Focus

    Hello everyone!

    I am a homeschool dad who is just starting out with a 6 year old boy. I, myself, was homeschooled, but not in the classical method. I am very excited about setting out on this journey and am trying to get a “road map” figured out.

    All that being said, my question is in regards to having our focus more on Greek, rather than Latin. It seems most go the other route (and I do understand the benefits of such a course) and although I plan to add Latin to their coursework, I would start with and emphasize Greek. My reasoning is that we are Greek Orthodox Christians and, therefore, there is a very practical reason for gaining proficiency in Greek (i.e.- Bible, hymns, liturgy, religious literature, etc.).

    In everyone’s opinion, is there a reason (besides the perceived difficulty level) that Latin would be preferable to start with (and focus on)?

    Thanks in advance,
    Michael

    #2
    Michael,
    Well, purely from a practical standpoint, not only is Latin easier for young children to learn, the resources exist to help students get all the way through learning the Latin grammar within their elementary years. The Forms series from Memoria Press is excellent training to master the Latin grammar, which then in turn ensures a solid grasp of English grammar. Learning an equivalent amount of Greek is significantly more challenging because of the level of complexity present in Greek. If you are familiar with it at all, you know that even learning Greek vocabulary is difficult because their translations are so nuanced. When I have seen my son’s flash cards, there is often nearly a paragraph written on the back to include all the meanings a word is understood to represent. Latin is much more direct, if that is even the right word.

    That being said, MP does offer the Elementary Greek program which is a great first start for kids who want to learn Greek. You would then follow that with First Form Greek, with the caution that FFG is easier to learn if a student has made it to at least Second Form Latin by then. This is where the above holds true...starting with Latin is going to help a lot even though your real goal is Greek. Doing them together would be a great way to go, if you have the time and the interest.

    AMDG,
    Sarah
    2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
    DD, 19, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
    DS, 16
    DD, 14
    DD, 12
    DD, 10
    DD, 8
    DD, 6
    +DS+
    DS, 2

    Comment


      #3
      Sarah makes some good points. My husband studied Latin in high school and college. When he went to seminary (in his 30s) he took Greek and Hebrew. His Greek class was very challenging for all of the students, but he said those in the class with a Latin background had a MUCH easier time learning the Greek. While teaching our children Latin, I have been very pleased to see how easy it is to teach English grammar within the context of our Latin studies. So if I were in your situation, I would begin with Latin and the bring Greek in when it is appropriate. I do understand your goals, though. We are Catholic and I am happy our children have a good Latin background for the same reasons you want your children to know Greek.

      One of the books I found helpful to read when we were beginning our homeschool journey was Latin Centered Curriculum by Andrew Campbell. That book plus the excellent articles that come to us through Memoria Press's magazine throughout the year, and then the wonderful support here in these forums really made this journey a lot easier.
      Samantha
      mom to 3:
      2 graduates
      1 8th grader doing a combination of MPOA and MP at home

      Comment


        #4
        Hello.

        We understand that for your Orthodox students, Greek becomes more necessary. The advantages to Latin are: 1) the alphabet (probably the biggest hurdle) 2) Latin is more structured with fewer exceptions, making it an ideal grammar study 3) Latin is the mother of English, which helps students to master their own vocabulary.

        That said, we aren't opposed to your starting Greek early, especially since it is so prevalent in your church life. That's why we offer Elementary Greek for young students. We do want you to have the option. But it would be nice if your students could get lots of Latin in too!

        Tanya

        Comment


          #5
          Thank you all very much for your thoughtful responses! I see wisdom in your advice and will start with Latin while simultaneously teaching the Greek alphabet and do a stair-stepped approach.

          Thanks again,
          Michael

          Comment


            #6
            Michael204351, welcome to the forum from another homeschool dad who also has a six year old. And also originates from an Orthodox country, though not Greece. But I'd share some spanikopita and baklava over Greek coffee with you any day.

            Your question is an important one given your background and I absolutely understand you asking it. I have asked myself the same as I also think knowing the Greek language is very important. After studying and investigating more, I have come to the conclusion that it is better for my kids to learn Latin first and then Greek. Though they will start learning Greek fairly early.

            You have gotten a lot of great responses that I won't repeat. One helpful article for me was the following:

            https://www.memoriapress.com/article...tin-and-greek/

            From the article, "About half of all English vocabulary comes from Latin and another 20 percent from Greek." If your child started as an English speaker this is a primary reason to start with Latin.

            Two great articles that really convinced me and summed it up well are the following, one by Cheryl Lowe and the other by Martin Cothran:

            https://www.memoriapress.com/article...tudying-latin/

            https://www.memoriapress.com/article...s-study-latin/

            Also, there has been a few great discussions about this topic before, the most helpful thread for you (in my opinion) is here:

            https://forum.memoriapress.com/forum...w-to-add-greek

            Hopefully this will be of help.
            2019/2020 - 2nd MP Year
            S - 6, K @ home and HLN
            D - 4, rising through minor leagues quickly
            S - 2, the master of disasters

            Comment


              #7
              Hello. I have a post here that needs to be approved/released from captivity. Thank you in advance.
              2019/2020 - 2nd MP Year
              S - 6, K @ home and HLN
              D - 4, rising through minor leagues quickly
              S - 2, the master of disasters

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Beorn View Post
                Hello. I have a post here that needs to be approved/released from captivity. Thank you in advance.
                Sorry about that! Your post should be visible now. Thank you for letting us know.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Allie View Post

                  Sorry about that! Your post should be visible now. Thank you for letting us know.
                  No problem, Allie. Thank you!
                  2019/2020 - 2nd MP Year
                  S - 6, K @ home and HLN
                  D - 4, rising through minor leagues quickly
                  S - 2, the master of disasters

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I think another thing to consider is whether learning Classical Greek is the most helpful from a religious point of view. Ecclesiastical Latin is still very related to more Classical Latin because it hasn’t been a spoken language in so long. Greek has a much longer history that continues to present times and most modern Greek users can’t read Classical Greek. I think Latin for the structure of language for now and ask your priest what they offer for language classes so you get the most useful form of Greek for your liturgical needs. We aren’t orthodox, but I know Greek Orthodox parishes around here offer language instruction.
                    Dorinda

                    For 2019-2020
                    DD 16 - 11th with MPOA(AP Latin), Lukeion (Greek4 & Adv. NT Greek), Thinkwell (Economics and Chemistry), plus Pre-Calculus, American G’ment, Early Church History set, and British Lit
                    DS 14 - 8th with MPOA(Fourth Form), CLRC(Intro Lit and Comp), plus Algebra, Field Biology, Classical Studies 1
                    DS 11 - 6th with Right Start Level G online class
                    DS 6 - 1st with Prima Latina

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X