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    Concerned about getting enough exposure to other cultures in MP curriculum

    Hi! I know it seems like I'm posting a lot of doubts about MP, but I don't mean it to come across that way--I'm trying to think deeply about all of our options so that I can make a decision I can stick with! Anyway, one of the negatives about homeschooling is that primarily, we are only exposed to people like ourselves, at least in our area. It seems to me that history and literature present an incredible opportunity to experience other ethnicities, cultures, income strata, worldviews, religions, etc. It appears that MP, with its focus on Western Culture, does not do that. All of the literature books feature white people. With the exception of SOTW 4, the only history studied is Western history, and it has a significant focus on men in history. Similarly, Latin, while amazing and logical and easy for me to teach, does not enhance our ability to communicate with other people groups. I love the academic rigor of MP, and the focus on writing, and the streamlined curriculum guides that finally provide the exact amount of structure I need--I am just concerned that MP is not expanding my children's view of how multicultural our world is now. I would appreciate feedback on this!
    Ora et Labora!
    Emily

    Beech Tree Boarding School, 2020-2021
    DD (age 9): 4NU
    DD (age 7): MP 1
    DS (age 4): MP Jr. K
    "I feel above me the day-blind stars waiting with their light. For a time, I rest in the grace of the world, and am free." Wendell Berry

    #2
    You're probably going to get a lot of feedback from others that actually know something about MP. Can I just share my opinion, as someone with a lot of multicultural ties? To me, it is a lot easier to add cultural studies than it is to take a curriculum with broad cultural exposure (and by broad...I mean so broad that they often don't have much time for depth) and try to turn it into a curriculum that teaches skills sequentially. I know that this won't work for everyone, but, to me, adding a little cultural richness seems easier than trying to recreate the structure that MP offers. That said...my daughter is exposed to Hebrew, French, and ASL every day, and we are very slowly reading through a set of books about world cultures (without the pressure of needing to move on and keep up a curriculum's schedule). Living in a white, English-dominant farming community in South Dakota, I am actually passionate about this topic. Personally, I just find it easier to add culture studies- what ever that is worth.

    Comment


      #3
      What is the set of books you are using, Jessica Louise ? You are right--I could totally add that to our "morning time" reading, and then supply my independent readers with some "mom selected" free reading books that expose her to a bit more.
      Ora et Labora!
      Emily

      Beech Tree Boarding School, 2020-2021
      DD (age 9): 4NU
      DD (age 7): MP 1
      DS (age 4): MP Jr. K
      "I feel above me the day-blind stars waiting with their light. For a time, I rest in the grace of the world, and am free." Wendell Berry

      Comment


        #4
        All valid questions to ask, however I strongly disagree that Latin doesn't help our ability to communicate with other people groups. If your student studies one modern language, they will be able to communicate with one other group. If they study Latin, they will much more quickly be able to pick up many other languages later because they will have a deep understanding of grammar. At least that has been our experience, even when applied to non-Romance languages such as Russian.

        I have also never looked to MP to teach about other cultures to my children, but rather I do that by exposing them to these things extra-curricularly. Here are just a few examples we have done:
        A local group holds an inter-denomination prayer service - I bring my kids and hear from Buddist, Muslim, Bahai, and Hindu speakers.
        The local university holds an International Festival - I take my children and experience their food, music, and art.
        A regional museum has a special Chinese art exhibit - I take my kids.
        Great Courses Plus has a series about influential women before 1400 - we watch it for fun
        We have hosted exchange students from South Korea, Thailand, Spain
        We get international magazines and read about the world
        We volunteer at food pantries and with foster children
        My kids' favorite food when we do travel to the nearest city - Ethiopian!
        My daughter submitted an essay for a scholarship on Diversity and won!

        We live in a rural, extremely homogeneous area of the country, so it is not that we have the benefit of a big city with lots of cultural opportunities to explore. Having a narrow or broad worldview is not about the curriculum one uses, and one can certainly provide a broad exposure to the world if that is a something that the parents value. What is important to the parents will be absorbed by the children. MP provides a solid curriculum that any family can build on.
        Kristin - Administrator for Vita Beata (discussion classes for MP users)
        DD19; AFROTC and Aerospace Engineering Major
        DD16; Senior - doing MP Divine Comedy, Renaissance & Reformation, Cicero & Augustine, and moderating 4th Grade Literature for Vita Beata.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by klwalukas View Post
          All valid questions to ask, however I strongly disagree that Latin doesn't help our ability to communicate with other people groups. If your student studies one modern language, they will be able to communicate with one other group. If they study Latin, they will much more quickly be able to pick up many other languages later because they will have a deep understanding of grammar. At least that has been our experience, even when applied to non-Romance languages such as Russian.

          I have also never looked to MP to teach about other cultures to my children, but rather I do that by exposing them to these things extra-curricularly. Here are just a few examples we have done:
          A local group holds an inter-denomination prayer service - I bring my kids and hear from Buddist, Muslim, Bahai, and Hindu speakers.
          The local university holds an International Festival - I take my children and experience their food, music, and art.
          A regional museum has a special Chinese art exhibit - I take my kids.
          Great Courses Plus has a series about influential women before 1400 - we watch it for fun
          We have hosted exchange students from South Korea, Thailand, Spain
          We get international magazines and read about the world
          We volunteer at food pantries and with foster children
          My kids' favorite food when we do travel to the nearest city - Ethiopian!
          My daughter submitted an essay for a scholarship on Diversity and won!

          We live in a rural, extremely homogeneous area of the country, so it is not that we have the benefit of a big city with lots of cultural opportunities to explore. Having a narrow or broad worldview is not about the curriculum one uses, and one can certainly provide a broad exposure to the world if that is a something that the parents value. What is important to the parents will be absorbed by the children. MP provides a solid curriculum that any family can build on.
          Those are all great points. I could definitely work on thinking more outside the box about all of this. We are moving this summer to a more urban setting and I bet there are all kinds of experiences there we could look into!
          Ora et Labora!
          Emily

          Beech Tree Boarding School, 2020-2021
          DD (age 9): 4NU
          DD (age 7): MP 1
          DS (age 4): MP Jr. K
          "I feel above me the day-blind stars waiting with their light. For a time, I rest in the grace of the world, and am free." Wendell Berry

          Comment


            #6
            Can I just ask what your goals are? In today's society we are pushed in to doing so many things that we "should" do...in by whatever method is currently in vogue. What I mean is, many schools will have children learn how to count to 10 in 10 different languages. I can think of reasons for that, but it wouldn't help us reach our goals.

            IF you want for your child to have knowledge of other countries and cultures, so that they know the basics of major people groups and appreciate this big world, then perhaps consider slowly moving through a broader program, such as Around the World with Picture Books, from Beautiful Feet Books. It is lovely! It is a fabulous Morning Basket option. You could use it very slowly, as a supplement. I think that volumes 1 & 2 are intended to be used in one year, but you could spread it out over something like four years.

            IF your goal is for your child to value other people and their perspectives, and for your children to be able to work well with others that are different from them, delving into one culture might really help. Is there a migrant family nearby that would love to tell your children stories about life in the old country? In my opinion, a relationship with one person can sometimes be more enlightening than a curriculum, but it completely depends on the person and the curriculum. Studying one culture and their language deeply enough to actually understand how they might think through a situation is powerful.

            SonLight or BookShark include books from different cultures and perspectives. It is different from Around the World with Picture Books, which will really focus on one country at a time. It is more like looking at history from different perspectives rather than focusing on one culture at a time.

            I'm sorry; my child keeps interrupting me, so I hope that I will still make sense. If I missed the mark, please message me. I love this topic!

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by klwalukas View Post
              All valid questions to ask, however I strongly disagree that Latin doesn't help our ability to communicate with other people groups. If your student studies one modern language, they will be able to communicate with one other group. If they study Latin, they will much more quickly be able to pick up many other languages later because they will have a deep understanding of grammar. At least that has been our experience, even when applied to non-Romance languages such as Russian.

              I have also never looked to MP to teach about other cultures to my children, but rather I do that by exposing them to these things extra-curricularly. Here are just a few examples we have done:
              A local group holds an inter-denomination prayer service - I bring my kids and hear from Buddist, Muslim, Bahai, and Hindu speakers.
              The local university holds an International Festival - I take my children and experience their food, music, and art.
              A regional museum has a special Chinese art exhibit - I take my kids.
              Great Courses Plus has a series about influential women before 1400 - we watch it for fun
              We have hosted exchange students from South Korea, Thailand, Spain
              We get international magazines and read about the world
              We volunteer at food pantries and with foster children
              My kids' favorite food when we do travel to the nearest city - Ethiopian!
              My daughter submitted an essay for a scholarship on Diversity and won!

              We live in a rural, extremely homogeneous area of the country, so it is not that we have the benefit of a big city with lots of cultural opportunities to explore. Having a narrow or broad worldview is not about the curriculum one uses, and one can certainly provide a broad exposure to the world if that is a something that the parents value. What is important to the parents will be absorbed by the children. MP provides a solid curriculum that any family can build on.
              Wow! That's really amazing! We have nothing like that here, but those are great ideas to shoot for when my daughter is old enough to travel further!

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Jessica Louise View Post
                Can I just ask what your goals are? In today's society we are pushed in to doing so many things that we "should" do...in by whatever method is currently in vogue. What I mean is, many schools will have children learn how to count to 10 in 10 different languages. I can think of reasons for that, but it wouldn't help us reach our goals.

                IF you want for your child to have knowledge of other countries and cultures, so that they know the basics of major people groups and appreciate this big world, then perhaps consider slowly moving through a broader program, such as Around the World with Picture Books, from Beautiful Feet Books. It is lovely! It is a fabulous Morning Basket option. You could use it very slowly, as a supplement. I think that volumes 1 & 2 are intended to be used in one year, but you could spread it out over something like four years.

                IF your goal is for your child to value other people and their perspectives, and for your children to be able to work well with others that are different from them, delving into one culture might really help. Is there a migrant family nearby that would love to tell your children stories about life in the old country? In my opinion, a relationship with one person can sometimes be more enlightening than a curriculum, but it completely depends on the person and the curriculum. Studying one culture and their language deeply enough to actually understand how they might think through a situation is powerful.

                SonLight or BookShark include books from different cultures and perspectives. It is different from Around the World with Picture Books, which will really focus on one country at a time. It is more like looking at history from different perspectives rather than focusing on one culture at a time.

                I'm sorry; my child keeps interrupting me, so I hope that I will still make sense. If I missed the mark, please message me. I love this topic!
                I think my goals are to show that our family's way of life is not the only way of life, and that being American doesn't make us better or more special than any other nationality--basically, different is interesting, not scary or bad or misguided (at least until further study has been completed). I want my kids to know, deep down, that people are people and have intrinsic, unfathomable worth no matter what color their skin or language they speak or god they worship.

                After reading your post, I remembered that there is a book called Give Your Child the World, which is an annotated book list focusing on picture books and literature for grades PreK - 6. Another benefit of moving to a more urban place: the libraries will probably carry most of these books!!!!

                We aren't much into cultural events, even though klwalukas list is extensive! We are much more into outdoor recreation and we go camping any weekend we can, but the kids are starting to learn skills like whittling and chopping wood and building fires, and those are skills that keep them connected to the past as well as appreciate peoples for whom those activities are not choice, but necessity.
                Ora et Labora!
                Emily

                Beech Tree Boarding School, 2020-2021
                DD (age 9): 4NU
                DD (age 7): MP 1
                DS (age 4): MP Jr. K
                "I feel above me the day-blind stars waiting with their light. For a time, I rest in the grace of the world, and am free." Wendell Berry

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Fireweed Prep View Post
                  It seems to me that history and literature present an incredible opportunity to experience other ethnicities, cultures, income strata, worldviews, religions, etc. It appears that MP, with its focus on Western Culture, does not do that. All of the literature books feature white people.
                  1. We should all have the temerity to reject ideas based on their merit, not on the color of the skin of those who advocate the ideas. If you look at the library of the great orator Frederick Douglass, he read the Bible, Homer's Illiad and Odyssey, Lord Byron, Dickens, Hawthorne, Wilberforce, Dumas, Shakespeare, and Burns. He used the great IDEAS of these works, not casting them aside because of the color of the skin or nationality of the authors, to advocate for the abolition of slavery, using logic, reason, and persuasion to remind people of the ideals they claimed to believe.

                  2. In MP-directed curricula, we've studied Jews, Africans (Egyptians, Carthaginians), Canaanites/Middle Easterners, Spaniards, Greeks, Etruscans, Romans, Franks/Goths (later French, Germans, Dutch, British, Scots), Celts/Druids, Vikings/Scandinavians (Norse Mythology), Russians, Chinese (multiple years, multiple books in Enrichment as well as SOTW Vol 1), as well as enslaved African Americans. So, saying MP "does not experience" or explore "other ethnicities, cultures, income strata, worldviews, religions, etc", is.....perhaps a reflection that you haven't been with MP long enough to have experienced the beautiful way MP introduces and explores these great people groups. They are all there if you do a little digging and have a little patience. I might commend the Celebrations book as part of MP1's studies.

                  3. MP absolutely establishes the universal worth and human dignity of all created beings, regardless of race, culture, religion or creed. It does so in Christian Studies, which you mentioned you are skipping. The first lesson in CSI tells our students that we are created in the image of God (imago Dei), so to dishonor, demean or subordinate another human being is to be guilty of violating another image-bearer. And our founding American documents go even further, declaring that all men are created equal. It is because of these fundamental values that America has been a torch-bearer in human freedom, human rights, and human dignity, cognizant of its moral failings, but willing to improve. We cannot hope to continue the existence of these RARE ideas if we don't spend a significant chunk of our time reading about them, debating them and committing them to memory.

                  4. Yes, all humans are created equal, but not all ideas are. There is a pervasive misrepresentation that Western Civilization has cornered the market on imperialism, slavery, warfare, and human oppression, and that we need to dramatically atone for this by granting moral equivalency to all cultures. The idea goes: Western cultures are no better than other cultures, so all cultures are equally worthy of study. And because "Western Civilization" predominated for so long in academia, it's time to right the wrong by giving equal time and attention to a variety of cultures. We have the hubris to say that by devoting some time to reading a few books a few times a year, that we have "done our part" in making up for the wrong that has been enacted against them. No offense, but I'd much rather someone actually believe I am a human, with inherent dignity and worth, than someone read a few books from another person's perspective and call it good. What matters is how we treat people and WHY we treat them the way we do.

                  5. My whole family is multi-cultural, and all but one of us are Americans. We have many outside of class opportunities and 3 long months over the summer to travel, create traditions, read widely, and enjoy the current traditions passed down from our family that is Jewish, Spanish, Native American, Russian, European (and by marriage Filipino, Japanese and African American). We treat others with honor and respect because they are made in the image of God, and that is far more important than my kids reading books about the Native American or Hispanic heritage of their abuela. Good ideas are good ideas, no matter where they come from, and for our main course of study, we focus first on those so that when they do go out into the world, they can compare competing ideologies to the solid foundation we built. Then, in the face of the truly horrible ideas that abound today, they can, with dignity and respect, reject the idea while loving the person. THAT is missing in droves in today's political environment! If you look at the trap the public schools have fallen victim to, they're in a mad race to include everyone in their list of people groups they need to "substantiate" by including in a text. My Japanese nephew cannot relate to the story of a Chinese boy, because in his mind, his culture is drastically different and ignores the tension that has gone on between China, Japan, Korea, and the Philipines for millenia. But the schools have put the check in the box for "Asian" and moved on because it is unable to make the bold statement that all humans have value and are created by God, worthy of dignity and respect.

                  What I respect about MP is that it advances the ideas of democracy, independence, term limits, elected representatives, a constitutional republic, logic, reason, open debate and free speech, and the ability to speak the truth, or criticize your government and elected officials, all by sharing with us where these ideas came from. After that, it concentrates on effective communication (oral and written) and a well-informed knowledge base of geography, language, and history necessary to understand all of these truths. Finally, MP conveys it all in a way that neither glosses over its inadequacies and moral failings (by today's enlightened standards), nor does it dwell on them.

                  America IS exceptional. American people are no more valuable than any other human God created.
                  Mama to 2

                  Summer:
                  MPK with SC1 Phonics & Math
                  SY 20/21
                  4A

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by enbateau View Post

                    1. We should all have the temerity to reject ideas based on their merit, not on the color of the skin of those who advocate the ideas. If you look at the library of the great orator Frederick Douglass, he read the Bible, Homer's Illiad and Odyssey, Lord Byron, Dickens, Hawthorne, Wilberforce, Dumas, Shakespeare, and Burns. He used the great IDEAS of these works, not casting them aside because of the color of the skin or nationality of the authors, to advocate for the abolition of slavery, using logic, reason, and persuasion to remind people of the ideals they claimed to believe.

                    2. In MP-directed curricula, we've studied Jews, Africans (Egyptians, Carthaginians), Canaanites/Middle Easterners, Spaniards, Greeks, Etruscans, Romans, Franks/Goths (later French, Germans, Dutch, British, Scots), Celts/Druids, Vikings/Scandinavians (Norse Mythology), Russians, Chinese (multiple years, multiple books in Enrichment as well as SOTW Vol 1), as well as enslaved African Americans. So, saying MP "does not experience" or explore "other ethnicities, cultures, income strata, worldviews, religions, etc", is.....perhaps a reflection that you haven't been with MP long enough to have experienced the beautiful way MP introduces and explores these great people groups. They are all there if you do a little digging and have a little patience. I might commend the Celebrations book as part of MP1's studies.

                    3. MP absolutely establishes the universal worth and human dignity of all created beings, regardless of race, culture, religion or creed. It does so in Christian Studies, which you mentioned you are skipping. The first lesson in CSI tells our students that we are created in the image of God (imago Dei), so to dishonor, demean or subordinate another human being is to be guilty of violating another image-bearer. And our founding American documents go even further, declaring that all men are created equal. It is because of these fundamental values that America has been a torch-bearer in human freedom, human rights, and human dignity, cognizant of its moral failings, but willing to improve. We cannot hope to continue the existence of these RARE ideas if we don't spend a significant chunk of our time reading about them, debating them and committing them to memory.

                    4. Yes, all humans are created equal, but not all ideas are. There is a pervasive misrepresentation that Western Civilization has cornered the market on imperialism, slavery, warfare, and human oppression, and that we need to dramatically atone for this by granting moral equivalency to all cultures. The idea goes: Western cultures are no better than other cultures, so all cultures are equally worthy of study. And because "Western Civilization" predominated for so long in academia, it's time to right the wrong by giving equal time and attention to a variety of cultures. We have the hubris to say that by devoting some time to reading a few books a few times a year, that we have "done our part" in making up for the wrong that has been enacted against them. No offense, but I'd much rather someone actually believe I am a human, with inherent dignity and worth, than someone read a few books from another person's perspective and call it good. What matters is how we treat people and WHY we treat them the way we do.

                    5. My whole family is multi-cultural, and all but one of us are Americans. We have many outside of class opportunities and 3 long months over the summer to travel, create traditions, read widely, and enjoy the current traditions passed down from our family that is Jewish, Spanish, Native American, Russian, European (and by marriage Filipino, Japanese and African American). We treat others with honor and respect because they are made in the image of God, and that is far more important than my kids reading books about the Native American or Hispanic heritage of their abuela. Good ideas are good ideas, no matter where they come from, and for our main course of study, we focus first on those so that when they do go out into the world, they can compare competing ideologies to the solid foundation we built. Then, in the face of the truly horrible ideas that abound today, they can, with dignity and respect, reject the idea while loving the person. THAT is missing in droves in today's political environment! If you look at the trap the public schools have fallen victim to, they're in a mad race to include everyone in their list of people groups they need to "substantiate" by including in a text. My Japanese nephew cannot relate to the story of a Chinese boy, because in his mind, his culture is drastically different and ignores the tension that has gone on between China, Japan, Korea, and the Philipines for millenia. But the schools have put the check in the box for "Asian" and moved on because it is unable to make the bold statement that all humans have value and are created by God, worthy of dignity and respect.

                    What I respect about MP is that it advances the ideas of democracy, independence, term limits, elected representatives, a constitutional republic, logic, reason, open debate and free speech, and the ability to speak the truth, or criticize your government and elected officials, all by sharing with us where these ideas came from. After that, it concentrates on effective communication (oral and written) and a well-informed knowledge base of geography, language, and history necessary to understand all of these truths. Finally, MP conveys it all in a way that neither glosses over its inadequacies and moral failings (by today's enlightened standards), nor does it dwell on them.

                    America IS exceptional. American people are no more valuable than any other human God created.
                    This is going in my homeschool binder so I can share it if anyone asks why I chose MP. WOW! What a great response. I have been trying to formulate a response to Fireweed's concerns and life has been getting in the way, but you said it all (and said it so much better than I could have done.)
                    Melisa

                    Homeschooling mom for 10 years

                    dd - 9th grade using MP and Homeschool Connections
                    ds - 7th grade using MP

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Oh, enbateau thank you so much for taking the time to write all that out! I very much treasure the time that more seasoned MP moms put into helping others on this forum. Thank you. I heartily agree with everything you said, honestly. I misspoke, too--I do think America is a great place to be and live. I do feel that we have drifted from our ideals but there is still so much potential! So many other curriculum options take extreme views: either America is absolutely perfect and to question that is sacrilegious, or America is a terrible nation and all it has ever done is subjugate minority groups. I think both of those polar views are incorrect and incomplete. And you are so right that their attempts to "mitigate" America's mistakes by tossing a few "cultural studies" into a textbook are completely missing the point of equal human worth and its foundation on the Divine.

                      I am also aware that right now, political stuff is coloring a lot of my outlook on life, and I am trying to parse out what I truly believe from what popular opinion may be--on both sides of the political divide. And I am using a lot of Western tradition logic, morals, and "reason" to do that! :-) I love your sentence "yes, all humans are created equal, but not all ideas are equal." I truly didn't mean to come across as rude; just searching--and I'm so glad I asked, because your response was golden :-)
                      Ora et Labora!
                      Emily

                      Beech Tree Boarding School, 2020-2021
                      DD (age 9): 4NU
                      DD (age 7): MP 1
                      DS (age 4): MP Jr. K
                      "I feel above me the day-blind stars waiting with their light. For a time, I rest in the grace of the world, and am free." Wendell Berry

                      Comment


                        #12
                        My heart is so relieved that you were open to hearing what has become so informative and convincing for me as I countered my own long-held beliefs through MP.
                        Mama to 2

                        Summer:
                        MPK with SC1 Phonics & Math
                        SY 20/21
                        4A

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Amen to all you ladies! I am humbled to sit at your feet.

                          Tanya

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by enbateau View Post

                            1. We should all have the temerity to reject ideas based on their merit, not on the color of the skin of those who advocate the ideas. If you look at the library of the great orator Frederick Douglass, he read the Bible, Homer's Illiad and Odyssey, Lord Byron, Dickens, Hawthorne, Wilberforce, Dumas, Shakespeare, and Burns. He used the great IDEAS of these works, not casting them aside because of the color of the skin or nationality of the authors, to advocate for the abolition of slavery, using logic, reason, and persuasion to remind people of the ideals they claimed to believe.

                            2. In MP-directed curricula, we've studied Jews, Africans (Egyptians, Carthaginians), Canaanites/Middle Easterners, Spaniards, Greeks, Etruscans, Romans, Franks/Goths (later French, Germans, Dutch, British, Scots), Celts/Druids, Vikings/Scandinavians (Norse Mythology), Russians, Chinese (multiple years, multiple books in Enrichment as well as SOTW Vol 1), as well as enslaved African Americans. So, saying MP "does not experience" or explore "other ethnicities, cultures, income strata, worldviews, religions, etc", is.....perhaps a reflection that you haven't been with MP long enough to have experienced the beautiful way MP introduces and explores these great people groups. They are all there if you do a little digging and have a little patience. I might commend the Celebrations book as part of MP1's studies.

                            3. MP absolutely establishes the universal worth and human dignity of all created beings, regardless of race, culture, religion or creed. It does so in Christian Studies, which you mentioned you are skipping. The first lesson in CSI tells our students that we are created in the image of God (imago Dei), so to dishonor, demean or subordinate another human being is to be guilty of violating another image-bearer. And our founding American documents go even further, declaring that all men are created equal. It is because of these fundamental values that America has been a torch-bearer in human freedom, human rights, and human dignity, cognizant of its moral failings, but willing to improve. We cannot hope to continue the existence of these RARE ideas if we don't spend a significant chunk of our time reading about them, debating them and committing them to memory.

                            4. Yes, all humans are created equal, but not all ideas are. There is a pervasive misrepresentation that Western Civilization has cornered the market on imperialism, slavery, warfare, and human oppression, and that we need to dramatically atone for this by granting moral equivalency to all cultures. The idea goes: Western cultures are no better than other cultures, so all cultures are equally worthy of study. And because "Western Civilization" predominated for so long in academia, it's time to right the wrong by giving equal time and attention to a variety of cultures. We have the hubris to say that by devoting some time to reading a few books a few times a year, that we have "done our part" in making up for the wrong that has been enacted against them. No offense, but I'd much rather someone actually believe I am a human, with inherent dignity and worth, than someone read a few books from another person's perspective and call it good. What matters is how we treat people and WHY we treat them the way we do.

                            5. My whole family is multi-cultural, and all but one of us are Americans. We have many outside of class opportunities and 3 long months over the summer to travel, create traditions, read widely, and enjoy the current traditions passed down from our family that is Jewish, Spanish, Native American, Russian, European (and by marriage Filipino, Japanese and African American). We treat others with honor and respect because they are made in the image of God, and that is far more important than my kids reading books about the Native American or Hispanic heritage of their abuela. Good ideas are good ideas, no matter where they come from, and for our main course of study, we focus first on those so that when they do go out into the world, they can compare competing ideologies to the solid foundation we built. Then, in the face of the truly horrible ideas that abound today, they can, with dignity and respect, reject the idea while loving the person. THAT is missing in droves in today's political environment! If you look at the trap the public schools have fallen victim to, they're in a mad race to include everyone in their list of people groups they need to "substantiate" by including in a text. My Japanese nephew cannot relate to the story of a Chinese boy, because in his mind, his culture is drastically different and ignores the tension that has gone on between China, Japan, Korea, and the Philipines for millenia. But the schools have put the check in the box for "Asian" and moved on because it is unable to make the bold statement that all humans have value and are created by God, worthy of dignity and respect.

                            What I respect about MP is that it advances the ideas of democracy, independence, term limits, elected representatives, a constitutional republic, logic, reason, open debate and free speech, and the ability to speak the truth, or criticize your government and elected officials, all by sharing with us where these ideas came from. After that, it concentrates on effective communication (oral and written) and a well-informed knowledge base of geography, language, and history necessary to understand all of these truths. Finally, MP conveys it all in a way that neither glosses over its inadequacies and moral failings (by today's enlightened standards), nor does it dwell on them.

                            America IS exceptional. American people are no more valuable than any other human God created.
                            This was wonderful! Thank you for putting this into words.
                            Dorinda

                            For 2020-2021
                            DD 17-12th with MPOA(Classical Studies 3), CLRC (Latin 6, Greek 5), Thinkwell (Calculus and Chemistry), Vita Beata (Divine Comedy), American History
                            DS 15-9th with Lukeion(Latin 1 and Greek 1), Vita Beata (9th Literature)
                            DS 12-7th with Right Start Level H online class, Vita Beata (6th Literature)
                            DS 6 - 2nd blazing our own trail with Right Start D and a mix of MP materials

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by Mom2mthj View Post
                              This was wonderful! Thank you for putting this into words.
                              Seconding this from Dorinda. I had read the OP, and was mulling it, but then stomach flu hit our house - hard. This was such a thorough and thoughtful response!

                              AMDG,
                              Sarah
                              2020-2021
                              16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
                              DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
                              DS, 17
                              DD, 15
                              DD, 13
                              DD, 11
                              DD, 9
                              DD, 7
                              +DS+
                              DS, 2

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