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    Starting Late on our MP Journey

    Hi, all! I'm trying to formulate a plan for my daughter for next Fall. She will be in 7th grade, but we have never used MP at all prior to starting this January with a few things. I am coming from a Charlotte Mason homeschool approach, but I found it wasn't rigorous enough for my liking (or perhaps I wasn't implementing it correctly or thoroughly enough). My thoughts are that I would start her at the 5th Grade core (even though she will be 7th grade), so that I could keep everything cohesive. I will have to take out the Insects study and substitute something else for science because she is working through that right now. My question is, will this be okay moving forward? That would put her at using the 7th grade core as a freshman and just ending with the 10th grade core when she is a senior. I feel like I've seen somewhere in the forum that I shouldn't worry about "levels," but sometimes we just need reassurance. Would you move forward with that or try something different? I would also be using a higher math than the Rod and Staff Level in that core, but I'm not super worried about that. Thanks!!


    #2
    Please allow me to say welcome! We have recently come back to MP after a few years of Charlotte Mason and I also have a 7th grader. While I am not comfortable offering you advise on how best to proceed (I am still figuring it out myself), rest assured you have come to the right place. I am sure you will receive excellent advise. I really just wanted to offer you and your daughter encouragement. You are both in for an educational treat! Yes, it will be rigorous and very different from CM, but oh so worth it. I am very happy that I finally gave in to my misgivings and headed back to MP. So, welcome.
    Melisa

    Homeschooling mom for 11 years

    dd - 11th grade using MP
    ds - 9th grade using MP and Kolbe Academy

    Comment


      #3
      Melisa Burke Thank you so much! I am already discovering just how rich the education is and I love it! My kids are still resisting a little bit because it's quite a jump from what we were doing, but they are adjusting quite well and I'm so pleased with what they are learning! My youngest will be starting Kindergarten next year and I plan on using MP from the start!

      Comment


        #4
        Other more experience people will chime in soon, but in the mean time...

        I don't think you're going to be able to stick to a core. I'd look at each subject sequence individually and figure out where to start from there. With Latin, you'll start at First Form, certainly. But literature might be 7th grade, or maybe a few from 6th to ease into it. Your math and science will be definitely off core too.

        So yeah, think core-less.
        ~ Carrie
        Catholic mom to four - ages 11, 9, 7, and 5
        8th year homeschooling, 3rd year MP!
        2020-2021: 6M with FFL, 4M with FFL, and some of 1st grade

        Comment


          #5
          carriede ...I'll give that a thought, too! I forgot to mention we are doing First Form right now, too. I just figured a little review wouldn't hurt in the fall again, but we will see how it goes.

          Comment


            #6
            Andrea,
            I'll try to come back later with something a little more practical, but I wanted to say it's never too late to begin. Never. Anecdotally, we had an 11th grade student join our tutorial this school year from a completely different background and she's absolutely thriving. First Form (yes!), Cicero, Divine Comedy, Accelerated Composition through MPOA. No one is starting from scratch. Just find where your child belongs within each piece the curriculum and let that be your starting point. Some things you will spend more time on and others will be easy. Some things will require you to go deep while others are nice even with some cursory exposure. jen1134 has some great tips on putting together multiple sets of individual lesson plans to craft a custom-core package for her kids. Maybe she can chime in or link you to her video (FB) about her planner. It was very good!

            Welcome, and take heart that you have a lot of runway left. A rising 7th grader has many, many years of school ahead!
            Festina lentē,
            Jessica P

            2021-2022 • 12th year HSing • 10th year MP
            12th • AP Latin online, DE Calculus & Physics, HLN
            10th • HLN, Latin online
            7th • HLN & Home
            4th • HLN & Home
            Me • Third Form for Adults, MPOA; teaching TFL and co-directing @

            Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School, est. 2016

            Comment


              #7
              pickandgrin ..Thanks so much! I'll admit one of the reasons I just want to do a full core is the Curriculum Manual and having everything in one place, but if jen1134 has some input on that, I'm definitely open! I don't want to hold my child back in any area, that's for sure. Jen has already helped me with so much through her blog and personal messages! She's awesome! Everyone here is so helpful!

              Comment


                #8
                Hi Andrea!

                When we started MP, my older two were 12 and 13. The oldest wasn't ready for MP8, so we placed both in MP7. My next guy down was 10, but he wasn't ready for MP5 so we did 4NU instead. My older guys had the binder with individual plans and my younger one fit nicely into a curriculum manual. Fast forward to today and that younger one is in 7th grade, but struggled greatly in Latin and grammar last year, and is taking Novare instead of Tiner. So he's scattered between levels and no longer has that nice curriculum manual (I think you saw his binder in the FB video we were chatting about). But it's okay because he's placed correctly. At the end of the day, that is the most important thing.

                If you look at where your girl is in individual subjects, where should she be placed in each? Is her reading great but writing weaker? Place for the writing. Is her reading and writing great but comprehension more difficult? Place for comprehension. Does she excel in one subject but struggle in others? Place accordingly for each subject, but pay close attention to everything that is included in that subject. I almost skipped a level in literature for my 11yo because he was ready for deeper comprehension; then my husband and I realized that the next level focuses on other skills he still needs to develop. So we're not jumping.




                Jennifer
                Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

                2021-2022
                DS18: Almost done!
                DS17: MP, MPOA
                DS15: MP, MPOA
                DS12: Mix of SC 5/6 & SC 7/8
                DD11: Mix of 5M and SC7/8
                DD9: SC3
                DD6: MPK

                Comment


                  #9
                  jen1134 ....Great advice. I think I’ll go with that instead. Thanks!! We are working through Fable right now and she’s doing great. She’s also studying Lassie right now, but needs encouragement to think deeper and not write the simplest of answers, so not sure where we should go next with Literature...is there somewhere that talks about each level in Literature and what skills they need in each?

                  Also, if I have her read Greek Myths over the summer, is that all the intro she would need to begin the Classical Studies for Core 5?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by jen1134 View Post
                    Hi Andrea!

                    I almost skipped a level in literature for my 11yo because he was ready for deeper comprehension; then my husband and I realized that the next level focuses on other skills he still needs to develop. So we're not jumping.



                    Hi Andrea,
                    Welcome! I'm following your post as it is similar to our situation and I hope you don't mind me asking Jen a question.

                    Jen, I'm wondering if you could indicate what are the different Literature levels and skills you noted above, as I too am trying to figure out which novels to cover in the next year or so and don't want to miss important skill development.

                    Thank you!

                    Monica
                    Monica
                    S - 14
                    S - 12

                    Comment


                      #11
                      KikaMarie ....I’m wondering the same, so no problem!! ?

                      Comment


                        #12
                        andreamichele13 KikaMarie, that's always been a tough one for me to figure out! While the guides are similar in each level, and follow a general progression from fact-based to synthesis across levels, the individual guides can surprise in the Enrichment sections. For example, in Charlotte's Web, there's an extensive focus on literary elements, while other guides from the same age range remind me more of the second grade Little House guide. Catfan gave a wonderful presentation on the literature guides at 2018's Sodalitas. It gives more insight into the progression of the guides as far as the vocabulary/question difficulty and what we're trying to achieve with each level. The video is here: https://www.memoriapress.com/streami...hering-videos/ (scroll down to Tuesday's sessions; it's called Teaching Grammar School Literature)

                        It's the Enrichment portions that seem to vary widely. The benefit of that is you can go deeper on more advanced skills even if your child still needs who/what/where type questions or is only able to read books whose guides are still at that level (my son). I've got brain fog going today, so I hope that made sense!

                        tanya Is there a good way to gauge the Enrichment portions or do you just have to look at a physical copy to do that? I was able to look at the Teacher Manuals from my older kids, but the online samples are naturally more limited.

                        Jennifer
                        Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

                        2021-2022
                        DS18: Almost done!
                        DS17: MP, MPOA
                        DS15: MP, MPOA
                        DS12: Mix of SC 5/6 & SC 7/8
                        DD11: Mix of 5M and SC7/8
                        DD9: SC3
                        DD6: MPK

                        Comment


                          #13
                          jen1134 ....Makes sense and thank you for your insight! I was just going through a few of the guides and perusing the samples and it gave me a pretty good idea as to what you were talking about. My 8th grade dyslexic is currently going through Door in the Wall and I’m not sure that it’s not more frustrating for him than anything else. I’m reading it to him and I would really like him to have a study he can do on his own. For my current 6th grader, Lassie is great for her, but she likes to pretend it’s too hard! ???‍♀️

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Hello, and welcome! You are getting good advice here, but I thought I would step in and offer a couple of ideas.

                            You will need to probably customize your curriculum subject by subject, but that is easily doable because you can get lesson plans for each subject. Let's look at the 5th grade core as an example: You could get the 5th grade curriculum manual with your core, and it will cover you nicely for Classical Composition (I think you will be fine starting with the Narrative for a 7th grader), Famous Men of Rome, Geography I, and Christian Studies II. But you will need the lesson plans for Second Form Latin since you are currently doing First Form. And since you are currently doing Lassie, you will need to sub out some of the literature. And science will need to be switched. I would recommend Trees since it is the most difficult of our nature science studies, and you need to get her ready for higher level science. What about math? Is she ready for prealgebra?

                            Another suggestion I would make is that if you would like to move her up to the 6th grade literature, you might consider reading through Famous Men of Rome this summer and doing Famous Men of the Middle Ages alongside that medieval literature. It would just be cohesive and fun if those two things could line up. But that is purely a suggestion, not a concern.

                            So you could use the 5th grade curriculum guide for several subjects and individual lesson plans for anything you are subbing.

                            As far as the enrichment portion of the literature guides goes, those sections of the guides are supplemental, and there is no rhyme or reason to them. They are really dependent on the teacher who wrote the guides and the kinds of supplemental things they have tried in their classrooms. And some of the books lend themselves to different activities (like the Expressions in Anne of Green Gables since she is so dramatic). Most of the time, we don't get to the Enrichment anyway! Every now and then, we will take one of the writing assignments and use it, but in order to get through all the literature books, we have to skip a lot of those projects and ideas. The things that are specific to grade level are the vocabulary and comprehension questions. The questions become more abstract as students age and become more developmentally able to handle abstraction and higher thinking skills. Our goal in the early years is for students to learn how to find information they have read and put it into good sentences. We work really hard on this through 4th grade. By 5th grade, we are starting to ask more big picture, thematic, or character analysis questions so that the answers may not be in black and white on a specific page. This is where you should see your students begin to rise to a bigger challenge, but you have to start with the more concrete questions first if your students haven't been trained in reading, finding the answer to a question, and putting that answer in a good sentence. I would start there, so it is good that you have lowered the reading level for your students.

                            I feel like I'm rambling, so I'm going to stop here. Let us know if you have any more questions though, or if I have confused you! We are always glad to help!

                            Tanya

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Forgot your Greek Myths question. Yes, if you read Greek Myths over the summer, your student will be well-prepared for classical studies, regardless of which time period you choose.

                              Tanya

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