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    Help planning my son's 8th grade year (MPOA + at home)

    Hi Everyone,

    I could use some help planning my son's 8th grade year. My plan on paper seems too full at the moment, and I am not sure what to prioritize and what to cut. We started with Memoria Press when my son was in 5th grade, which means we have been sort of "in limbo" with the complete cores. That means that I have to pick and choose the most important things to cover.

    This year we dabbled with MPOA classes, and they were a huge hit. (Especially as the material gets more challenging as we move towards high school.). They kept us on schedule so we might actually have a summer break. (That never happens!). They freed up some time for me to teach my other children. The instructors were all ethusiastic about the material. (I certainly never had the gumption to play games like "gladiator" in my latin lessons at home. I would have just told him to review his flashcards and called it "good enough". haha). My son also says that they were less work than when I teach them at home. (That is probably a good thing for both of us.) The thing that I liked about the MPOA classes was that it allowed me to take on more of the role of "mama" which is a good thing when you are parenting a teen. Instead of going through drill questions in preparation for a test, I was able to bake him cookies, give him a big hug, and encourage him while he worked hard to study. That just felt right and good. All that to say, if we can swing it financially, we would like to do even more MPOA classes next year and in the future.
    -------

    Before giving me advice, I should point out that my son is (by nature) a slow worker. He is the opposite of a list tackler. He works hard, but he just likes to take his time, contemplate things, and go through life slowly. That is just his personality. (I am the opposite, so I choose to believe that God is teaching me to slow down with this child!). From reading this forum, I have discovered that some students may be able to finish Latin or Literature in 30 minutes per day....but that has never been our experience. (Although I would love shorter school days for everyone!) I have a hunch that the time estimates on the MPOA website may be a little low for my particular child.

    Another issue we are having is that my son is very interested in math and science. The heavier humanities load that comes with a classical education (and a full MP core) means that he simply doesn't have the same amount of time to devote to math and science as some of his high-performing math/science peers do. The result: he is often held back. I am plagued with self doubt at my choices. I wonder if I am holding him back from his true passion? Last year I read the book Surprised by Joy by C.S. Lewis. One thing that added to my self-doubt was C.S. Lewis' own education. He had hours and hour per day to devote to his passion of language and literature. His knowledge of math and science was nearly nonexistent. If he had been pushed to take all of this math and science on top of his other studies, would he still have become the man we remember? One of the quotes from that book was, “the greatest service we can do to education today is to teach fewer subjects. No one has time to do more than a very few things well before he is twenty, and when we force a boy to be a mediocrity in a dozen subjects, we destroy his standards, perhaps for life.” Am I forcing my son into mediocrity? Math and science, at a high level, both take up an incredible amount of time. How do I strike a balance in high school while still providing a classical education? All this to say, it feels very lonely in the classical education world when you have a child bent on learning science and math. I'm not saying that I contemplate giving my son a "STEM" education. (Oh, how I shudder at the word!) But I want to give him room within a classical education to pursue more math and science. I'm looking for practical suggestions on what that looks like.

    8th Grade Year:
    Third Form Latin (with MPOA) - 1 hour per day
    8th Grade Literature (with MPOA) - 45 mins to 1 hour per day
    Foundations of Composition (with MPOA) -or- IEW (at home) - 1 hour per day?
    Classical Studies I (with MPOA) - 45 mins to 1 hour per day
    Traditional Logic I & II (with MPOA) - 30 mins per day (thinking I better do this before high school when his schedule gets even heavier)
    Honors Biology or Physics (at home or with another provider) - 1 hour per day?
    Math - Geometry or Algebra II (with AOPS, a very time intensive and challenging course!)* - MANY hours . (let's say at least 2-3 hours) (I put this at the end of his day and he works for hours and hours)
    American History - (thinking about trying to do a lighter version at home...see note)** - 30 mins to 1 hour per day
    Spelling Plus - 15 mins per day (Yep, his spelling is still terrible. Progress is slow, but happening.)
    English Grammar Recitation IV - 15 mins per day (I hate to quit now when we've gone so far!)
    Competitive Speech (future debate) - 30 mins per day (his favorite elective)

    This on top of all of the time the actual online classes take up.

    **American History note: I am thinking about doing the Joy Hakim "A History of US" audiobooks over lunch/chores as a family along with 200 questions About American History. Maybe some documentaries added since he enjoys those. Is this WAY too light to prepare him for high school history? I am hesitant to sign him up for another class with due dates and even more output required.

    Ideas to shorten our day:
    Combining Literature and Writing somehow so it can be completed in 1 hour per day. (1 standard "English" credit)
    Move Classical Studies I to High School?
    Switch to a normal "college prep" math that doesn't take all day. (My son is adamantly against this change and wants so badly to stick with AOPS. He finds the deeper level so interesting).
    Not finishing English Grammar Recitation (I could have him go through an intensive grammar program in the summer and call it good for English Grammar. Something like Analytical Grammar?)
    Not finishing Spelling (He is not a natural speller. Progress is and always will be slow. At what point do I call it good?)

    What he has already completed:
    Latin: Latina Christiana, First Form Latin, Second Form Latin
    Math: Pre-Algebra, AOPS Algebra I, AOPS Counting and Probability, AOPS Number Theory
    Literature: 4th Grade Lit Package, 5th Grade Lit Package, and a mix-match this year (Adam of the Road, King Arthur, The Trojan War)
    Science: Novare Physical Science and Novare Earth Science
    Classical Studies: D'Aulaires Greek Myths, FMOR, FMMA, and FMOG
    Christian Studies I, II, and III
    English Grammar Recitation I, II, III
    Modern Studies: US States + Capitals, Geography I and II, + various review books

    Gaps to Cover Before High School: My son has had ZERO American History to this point. (Although he listened to the SOTW audiobooks as a child.)

    ----------------------
    P.S. Sorry if this post rambles. Do you ever think about something so deeply that it is hard to express your thoughts clearly? That is where I am at. Sadly, my oldest is my guinea pig. He has a sister who is 16 month younger (who also LOVES math). Once I can work out a plan for my son, I am hoping to stick to something similar for my daughter.
    Cathy aka The Attached Mama
    2019-2020
    DS 12, 7th Grade
    DD 11, 6th Grade
    DS 5, K

    #2
    Cathy,

    This is an intimidating schedule. I don't know how much help I can give you, but I'm going to throw out a couple of ideas and hope others who have more recently had 8th graders can share their schedules with you. I do think that math, science, and Latin will (and should) all take an hour a day. But 2-3 hours for math a day seems excessive to me. Is there any way to slow that pacing down?

    You can combine literature and composition if you feel capable of editing your student's work. You could assign writing that is relevant to his literature (using the Enrichment portions of the study guides). And if you are editing, you can take care of English grammar there too. Just teach the grammar that you see he needs help with in his writing. At this point, grammar and writing are closely tied together. The purpose of grammar is to be able to speak and write well (and sound like an educated person).

    Since Traditional Logic counts as an English credit, you could just do TLI this year in the first semester, and do literature the second semester. Then, do the same thing for your 9th grade year (1 semester of lit and one of TL2). Your classical studies choice will have him reading the Iliad and Odyssey, so they can be considered literature too. You could wait on logic since he is doing debate. That is two extra courses you have added in.

    And you don't need to do American history in 8th grade. You could wait and do high school American history.

    I feel like this schedule as you have laid it out looks overwhelming, especially since it takes him longer to get his work done. Hopefully, he will speed up, but my oldest never did, so no promises there!

    Those are my ideas. Waiting to hear what others have to say also!

    Tanya

    Comment


      #3
      I don't have alot to add as I agree that is a very intimidating schedule. I am only going to float one idea and that is about the Logic, My current 11th grader took Logic 1 and 2 in 9th grade and it was a very light class for him in terms of workload. It is a good class. He enjoyed it and learned quite a bit but it was not a heavy workload at all and it was a relief to have that "lighter" class. Now, I have an upcoming 7th grader who has been in MP since K and loves MPOA classes. While she is on track to take Logic in 7th grade, I am specifically holding off until high school. I find the MPOA grade suggestions right on for my dd so I am sure she could handle the class, but my thought process is that in high school she will be that much more mature and a stronger student and perhaps the class, while still beneficial, will be a lighter one to take with the heavier high school classes. I guess my thinking is along the lines that she could take it in 7th and be challenged more or she could punt it to high school and have it be a lighter class (when compared to high school math and science). So that is just the flip side of feeling the pressure to cram something in before high school.

      I also think you could do the literature class OR Classical studies and call that literature for 8th grade. It isn't like 8th grade is the last time he will study literature. He has plenty of literature study ahead still. He could still read the books without doing the full class for the 8th grade lit. (That said, my dd will take both those classes next year so I don't consider it overkill but she is a very fast worker and she doesn't have accelerated math and science on her schedule.)

      I am interested in feedback from others, too. I get wound up about wanting to make sure we do all the things and take all the classes but it just isn't necessary or desirable to do that.

      And just as an anecdote, I have graduated two sons from homeschool and they are both getting ready to graduate college (one in May 2020, one in Dec 2020). They did not carry a schedule anywhere close to what you have laid out above and they still had good test scores and got scholarships and did well in college. Now, I am not saying that test scores and scholarships are the be all and end all. I am just noting that our children can be successful with far less than the ideal path we would plan for them. My 11th grader has done some MPOA but didn't have anything approaching the depth and rigor of your plan and he is so far beyond his peers. He hasn't taken honors or AP classes but has really good ACT scores and has started dual enrollment at the local university and he is at the top of all his classes. So, as much as we want to fit everything in, it really isn't necessary.

      Comment


        #4
        It sounds like you have a couple of things at play here:
        A serious student who needs more time to process things

        A budding teenager who is seeking more independence in their work

        A budding mathematician/scientist who needs time to develop further in that area

        A friend's son works at a similar pace to your son and he is in MPOA’s Diploma program which requires him to take 5 MPOA classes a year. He excels, and he is taking more difficult classes than your son would be simply due to being in high school, but it is rough going and the deadlines can be quite stressful. Not only do you have the daily time commitment, you also have 1-1/2 hours a week for the actual class. Multiply that by 5 classes and you’re already at 7.5 hours of time.

        I think there a couple of things to consider before you can really know how best to move forward:

        1. How much longer than the given estimates did it take your son for MPOA classes this past year? That might give you a good gauge when deciding on next year's classes

        2. How much time are his math/science peers spending on those studies each day? How much are they covering in that amount of time? With slower processing, it will take him more time to cover the same amount of work, but that might not be wise for him. Especially as he approaches high school, it’s going to be really important for him to learn how to balance his time between worthy endeavors. My son loves wood-turning and appears to have a gift for it, but he has had to learn that he can’t spend all day (or even the majority of the day) on it and still meet his other responsibilities well. It’s an important life lesson. Even adults who love their work can’t spend all of their time on it without sacrificing health and family.
        Jennifer
        Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

        DS16
        MP: Lit 10, VideoText Algebra
        MPOA: High School Comp. II
        HSC: Spanish I, Conceptual Physics, Modern European History, and electives

        DS15
        MP: Biology, Lit 10, VideoText Algebra, Greek Tragedies
        MPOA: High School Comp. II, Fourth Form Latin
        HSC: Modern European History

        DS12
        7M with:
        Second Form Latin, EGR III, and HSC for US History

        DS11
        SC Level 4

        DD9
        3A, with First Form Latin (long story!)

        DD7/8
        Still in SC Level 2

        DD 4/5
        SC Level C

        Comment


          #5
          My oldest will be 8th grade next year, and sounds a lot like your kiddo - he is very STEM-y, and will taking a fair amount of MPOA classes.

          This is his plan for next year:
          Latin - MPOA Henle II
          Greek - Lukeion Greek 1
          Math - AOPS (he'll likely finish Alg A videos this summer, but when we run out of videos, he'll start the online classes)
          Science - MPOA Intro Physics
          Comp - HS Comp II
          Logic - Co-op Material/Rhetoric
          Violin - 1 hr/day practice + lessons/orchestra

          In order to get humanities in, we have decided to do literature, classical studies, and religion over the summer - mostly just read & discuss so it doesn't feel quite so "school"-ish. His summer mornings will be violin, math, humanities, then he's free after lunch.
          Amanda - Mama to three crazy boys (7A, 6M, 2), classics major

          "Non nisi te, Domine. Non nisi te" - St. Thomas Aquinas

          Comment


            #6
            Hi Cathy!

            Everyone has brought up great points for you to be keeping in mind. We talk so often about how adaptable Classical education is to every child, regardless of circumstances as being a reason to be grateful. Yet that leaves US with that task of adapting it. When you add in the pressure we put on ourselves to "get it right so we don't mess up their lives," it is a heady responsibility to be sure!

            A couple of things I think are interesting from your original post. You do seem to be gaining an understanding of who your son is and what his strengths/weaknesses are. These are good to keep in mind so that you do encourage him to develop in the areas he seems to have an aptitude toward, but also challenge those weaker areas so that he does not live life making excuses for himself. We have one child whose nickname is "S.A.M" as in, "Slow As Molasses," because of her work habits. But I hesitate at using that in the present tense...because even she has finally risen to the occasion of a maintaining a high school workload. I used to have to be on top of her every minute of the day, and she no longer requires my monitoring her at all (well, mostly). So it is true that your son may grow into the ability to handle the kind of workload you want, but I would not expect that. Let it be a pleasant surprise. Plan what you think is reasonable given how he is now, and if he seems to excel, great. That means the next year you can add more in. But another thing about teens. Just about every one I know, reaches a point of wanting more than "just school." Does he already have some outside activities? If he doesn't, he will most likely need something. Don't make a plan that is so tight he does not have room for service, work, sports, a club, etc.

            Which brings me around to your question about wanting to provide a classical education to a son who mainly wants to work on math and science. Don't forget the Quadrivium! Yes, classical education means reading great texts and being a well-spoken, civilized person who is capable of logical thought and reasoned argument. But these are just the Trivium side of things. You can keep enough of that in your son's educational picture while still allowing for the fact that his aptitude leans toward the Quadrivium instead. But it means you will have to be realistic about what is possible. I know the temptation of wanting each of your children to follow the exact same path. But that does not have to be the case. My oldest has been a Trivium kid all the way, but her brother is definitely Quadrivium-driven. So their high school pictures will look similar, but still have significant differences, too. Even the way we have scheduled how they study their courses has been different. If math and science are what your son wants to study, but they take him a long time, then you definitely have to make concessions.

            Here is what I would suggest based on your thoughts:

            Math: Let him do the hardest math he wants to do. Be realistic about the time commitment per day. See what you have left and use that to make the rest of your decisions.

            Science: this does not have to be the hardest thing he can find. If math is going to be his biggest time sucker, he cannot have science be that also. Have him do a regular, non-vector physics class this year and don't let it be hugely difficult or time-consuming.

            Latin: Take Third Form with MPOA.

            Literature and/or Classical Studies: It would be tempting to say pick one of these...but right now, I wouldn't. Being in a class for one, and doing the other on his own would probably be a better way to go. In that case, I would say to enroll for Classical Studies (because these texts are hugely formative, lead into later texts, and are more challenging that the Lit selections) and then do as many lit guides from the 8th grade set as you can manage - even if you are finishing them over the summer.

            History: You don't need American History this year. If you do decide to do Classical studies and literature, you don't need a history this year. Save the time and let him age up a year. And there will be plenty of "history" in the classical studies class.

            English: All the other things you listed (Logic, Spelling, EGR, Speech, and Composition) could fall under the "English" subject heading. Keep in mind he's still an 8th grader. He doesn't need to be pulling too many things down from high school, especially given his normal work speed. I would give yourselves one more year to "finish" spelling and EGR. After this year, call it "good enough" and be thankful for spell-check and grammar suggestions. Save Logic for high school. I agree with the previous posts that the longer you wait, the easier it is for them to manage. Speech can still count as an extra-curricular - which means he has to make time for it outside of his regular school day. That just leaves composition. Based on what I have suggested, your son would have just two MPOA classes - which means he could probably handle Foundations of Comp. That's what I would suggest. Keeping up on comp with high schoolers is one of the hardest things there is. The extra accountability there will be worth the time commitment.

            I hope this is helpful!

            AMDG,
            Sarah



            2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
            DD, 19, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
            DS, 16
            DD, 14
            DD, 12
            DD, 10
            DD, 8
            DD, 6
            +DS+
            DS, 2

            Comment


              #7

              Originally posted by jen1134 View Post
              A friend's son works at a similar pace to your son and he is in MPOA’s Diploma program which requires him to take 5 MPOA classes a year. He excels, and he is taking more difficult classes than your son would be simply due to being in high school, but it is rough going and the deadlines can be quite stressful. Not only do you have the daily time commitment, you also have 1-1/2 hours a week for the actual class. Multiply that by 5 classes and you’re already at 7.5 hours of time.
              Yes, I was considering the MPOA diploma program, but it seems like it amounts to VERY long days.




              Originally posted by jen1134 View Post
              I think there a couple of things to consider before you can really know how best to move forward:

              1. How much longer than the given estimates did it take your son for MPOA classes this past year? That might give you a good gauge when deciding on next year's classes
              He is only taking two classes this year with MPOA.

              According to the MPOA website, for Second Form Latin, "Students will need to devote 30-45 minutes per day for this class." I find that we need to schedule in an hour per day to really do Latin justice and master the material. (Assuming I am doing recitation, vocabulary drill, spelling practice, etc.)

              The other classes he is taking is Famous Men of Middle Ages (and Famous Men of Greece next semester). According to the MPOA website, "Students will need to devote 30 minutes per day for this class."
              The class assigns a chapter reading, comprehension questions, and activities. He does that in 30 minutes per day, but I suspect that he has stopped doing the activities since the teacher isn't checking them. And his comprehension questions are very......succinct to say the least. . But he has been doing those too.

              Originally posted by jen1134 View Post
              2. How much time are his math/science peers spending on those studies each day? How much are they covering in that amount of time? With slower processing, it will take him more time to cover the same amount of work, but that might not be wise for him. Especially as he approaches high school, it’s going to be really important for him to learn how to balance his time between worthy endeavors. My son loves wood-turning and appears to have a gift for it, but he has had to learn that he can’t spend all day (or even the majority of the day) on it and still meet his other responsibilities well. It’s an important life lesson. Even adults who love their work can’t spend all of their time on it without sacrificing health and family.
              Well, the kids on his mathcounts team are spending at least 2-3 hours per day on math. I am not sure how long the kids in his AOPS class spend per day. I asked around on TWTM forum, and it seems that the kids in high school typically spend about 3 hours or more per day in those math classes. (This is not "normal" math. It is challenging/frustrating/hard.... but my son loves it.). This kind of left me with the realization that I have to make a choice. We simply can't do the whole MPOA diploma (or complete core at home) and those math classes. Something has gotta give.
              Last edited by TheAttachedMama; 01-21-2020, 03:07 PM.
              Cathy aka The Attached Mama
              2019-2020
              DS 12, 7th Grade
              DD 11, 6th Grade
              DS 5, K

              Comment


                #8
                Hi Cathy,

                I do *SO* miss the planning part of homeschool. That was always my favorite part.

                Can I add a little bit here? In the classical school that my youngest now attends, they handle 7th and 8th in a really terrific way. The students have 4 subjects that run all year long (one hour subjects) and 4 subjects which are semester only. It looks like this:

                Latin - full year
                Classical History - full year
                Literature/comp - full year
                Math - full year
                Music/Old Testament - split to create a full year
                Science/Art - split to create a full year

                Why do I tell you this? Because that is 6 hours of work each day for my son (and he doesn't tend to have a lot of homework each night, either) which is both substantial AND can create that effect of mastery in the student of that age. I love it! It is multum non multa in action.

                So, thought #1, look at your son's 8th grade schedule and consider limiting it to 6 hours.

                A few more thoughts.

                Third form is a beast. One hour per day may not be enough, so keep in mind that if you set an aggressive math curriculum for him, and expect TFL to be completed in a year, you might be looking at over 2 hours right there. BTW, I personally thing that these are your academic stakes-in-the-ground anyway.

                Now add your next "hour" subject in order of your goals. Whatever you decide, be realistic. An 8th grade boy needs some time to move, think, grow, and... fuss. Maybe consider Tanya's idea of "semester split" of some of the work. The LPs wont be as useful to you, but then again, maybe your son can set HIS pace, which has value itself.

                Finally, I will give you my thoughts on adding American History on top of it all.

                I always did. But here's how I did it: I would get some excellent American History readers and ask your son to spend 30 mins a day working through a book. Sonlight or Bookshark are great resources for book lists. You don't have to pick only dry "college prep" books for him. In fact, I'd recommend you select readers which promote wonder and delight while establishing "hooks" for him to hang American history facts in his memory. The Story of US books could actually be used this way if your son is more the non-fiction type. Either way, I'd place that idea as "out of school reading", with no expectations attached.

                Hope that helped maybe a little!


                Jen
                DS, 26 yrs, graduated from MIT (Aerospace), recently completed the design and execution of unhackable military software... in his spare time.

                DS, 24 yrs, graduated from SIU's School of Business, ENGAGED!

                DD, 21 yrs, Senior in Education at The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC

                DS, 12 yrs, currently attending a classical school which would give HLS a run for its money.

                All homeschooled.

                Me: retired after 16 years of continuous homeschooling. Ahhh....

                Comment


                  #9
                  I'm going to chime in as someone who has a deliberate, methodical, thoughtful (pick your favorite word for slow, LOL) worker, and also STEM focused. Yes, my 11th grader will happily spend 2-3 hours a day on math. She will start the day with more than an hour of math, and then go back to it for "fun" for hours after all her other work is done. We have used MP since we started homeschooling in 4th grade, but never a complete core, and never an MPOA class. Here is how I have adapted MP to work for this kid.

                  1) History is light. It is not that she doesn't like it, but she doesn't want to spend a lot of time on it. So we use the Mills books as our high school history credits, except for US History which is a lot of Great Courses Lectures, documentaries, and Khan Academy. My husband is a history nerd, and is always talking about history and connections, and we have great in depth discussions about history.
                  2) Literature is read and discuss. I don't make her write out the answers in the study guides.
                  3) Writing - We did some MP composition earlier, but now she really just writes essays that she can submit for scholarship essay contests, some of which she wins. She is much more willing to write for the possibility of $300 than for a grade from Mom.
                  4) We did logic as intensive summer classes at home. Both can be completed in one summer, or you could do one each summer.

                  So, it is not the ideal MP sequence that I have always dreamed of being able to follow, but it is what works for this girl. I came home from work last night to listen to her jabber on about how fun differential equations are, and how she started down the wrong path on one of her Physics problems and why, and then how she figured out how to solve it. Then we sat and talked about Gawain and the Green Knight, and I checked her research activities from her Mills Middle Ages study guide, and watched a lecture from a Great Courses series she picked about influential woman before 1400. All in all, a rich, homeschool education and a happy student!
                  Kristin - Administrator for Vita Beata (discussion classes for MP users)
                  DD18; AFROTC and Aerospace Engineering Major
                  DD16; Junior

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I wouldn't dare giving out practical advice to anyone: my ambitious schedules are like those war plans never surviving the first day of battle, and what I see every time is that priorities just assert themselves even when I was considering *everything* a priority. This year composition and formal grammar have somehow taken the back seat, but of course there is still plenty of excellent writing with MP/MPOA...

                    But I thought I'd chime in briefly, too, since I have an 8th grade son who looks very much like that. The one thing I wanted to address is the doubts about sacrificing personal passions to forge ahead with a classical education, heavy on the humanities.

                    For all my doubts and fears that can keep me up at night, one thing I don't have any uncertainty about is the idea that science/math at a higher level CAN wait. For me, it is very important with my scientifically/technically minded son that the humanities take absolute precedence now, so that he will have the right frame of mind when he tackles his future studies. What Lewis immersed himself in were the humanities: we can't simply say that he immersed himself in his passions, generically. It worked wonders for him because his passion happened to be literature, etc. This is to say that not every passion should be given the same importance, the same role in one's education and upbringing: things need to be well-ordered. Immersing ourselves in the humanities is necessary for us to think the right way about everything else. So for kids obviously destined to the scientific field it's very important that they be gently guided while still at home: it's very important that they understand, as much as they are able, the principles of classical education, that they be helped embrace them, and see that focusing now on the humanities will one day make them better mathematicians, scientists, engineers, whatever. It's a lot to ask of a teenager, but it's vital. I know my son has the tendency to fall in love with any technological novelty, and to treat science uncritically: if I don't help him now develop the right philosophical framework to think about these things, what will help him? So we have a lot of conversations, and I will make sure that his education feeds his mind the right way. One fundamental thing for me is to make my children realize the beauty of the medieval mind, which was able to comprehend the unity of the cosmos much better than our modern, atomized, hyper-specialized mind. Modern science is a dangerous thing, it has its own philosophy but it denies having one - sneaky!

                    Sarah of course is right that at some point high school will look different for different children: my daughter will not need to study the kind of physics my son longs for. Maybe she'll do AP Literature, and he will not, but it won't be because literature is less important for him than for her. It will be a matter of degree, of intensity, but not of order of importance.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I want to thank everyone for your kind feedback!

                      Here is a "take two" to my schedule...

                      1) Third Form Latin (MPOA) - 60 to 90 minutes per day

                      2). Algebra II or Geometry (AOPS) - 120 minutes per day

                      3). Combined Literature and Writing (Other Provider) - 60 minutes per day

                      4). Classical Studies I (MPOA) - 45 to 60 minutes per day

                      5). Logic I / Logic II (MPOA) - 30 minutes per day. (Son wants to take this in prep for debate.)

                      6). Biology or Physics - 60 minutes per day

                      Electives:
                      Speech....possibly Novice Debate (his choice) - at least 30.

                      Over the Summer:
                      American History using Hakim books and sonlight books
                      English Grammar Recitation IV? (If I can talk him into this, otherwise I might just have to add it to his day. It typically takes 15 minutes, so it is not a huge deal.)

                      Not able to teach?
                      Spelling (even though he probably *should* study spelling some more.). Pull into summer? He probably spends 15 mins per day on this.
                      Geography III


                      This feels MUCH more reasonable. Am I missing any crucial subject that you can see?
                      Last edited by TheAttachedMama; 01-24-2020, 11:05 AM.
                      Cathy aka The Attached Mama
                      2019-2020
                      DS 12, 7th Grade
                      DD 11, 6th Grade
                      DS 5, K

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                        #12
                        I think you have struck a great balance! Not going to check if you are missing anything - it’s Friday and my brain has already started to shut down. But hoping for a successful year for you!

                        AMDG,
                        Sarah
                        2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
                        DD, 19, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
                        DS, 16
                        DD, 14
                        DD, 12
                        DD, 10
                        DD, 8
                        DD, 6
                        +DS+
                        DS, 2

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                          #13
                          My kids are taking Classical Studies I online this year: since they read all of Homer, you could count this as literature. After all, the class description says you can consider this 1 history credit or 1/2 history and 1/2 literature. So, if you plan to supplement in the summer with American History, that would give you a full history credit, and for the "official" literature part you wouldn't have to worry as much, since you get a lot of it done with Homer. CS I can also generate quite the amount of writing, if you insist on written answers to the questions in the student book (each class requires working on *at least* 3 lessons in the student book): while we haven't used our writing curriculum quite as much as I meant to this year, CS I has meant a lot of work on good writing anyway (especially on how to build a good, complex answer to a deeper question).

                          (Heads up about CS I: their teacher requires that the work be completed by the students before each class. It's not a method I particularly like, but I was told by Mr. Piland that it's a fairly common approach. Once you pick a class session, you could ask the teacher about this at the class open house, so you can schedule homework accordingly.)

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by Mrs Bee View Post
                            My kids are taking Classical Studies I online this year: since they read all of Homer, you could count this as literature. After all, the class description says you can consider this 1 history credit or 1/2 history and 1/2 literature. So, if you plan to supplement in the summer with American History, that would give you a full history credit, and for the "official" literature part you wouldn't have to worry as much, since you get a lot of it done with Homer. CS I can also generate quite the amount of writing, if you insist on written answers to the questions in the student book (each class requires working on *at least* 3 lessons in the student book): while we haven't used our writing curriculum quite as much as I meant to this year, CS I has meant a lot of work on good writing anyway (especially on how to build a good, complex answer to a deeper question).

                            (Heads up about CS I: their teacher requires that the work be completed by the students before each class. It's not a method I particularly like, but I was told by Mr. Piland that it's a fairly common approach. Once you pick a class session, you could ask the teacher about this at the class open house, so you can schedule homework accordingly.)
                            Thanks for the heads up!
                            We took the famous men classes this year, and it had the same format: you read the lesson (and write about it) first and come to class ready to discuss. So I think they will do OK with that format.
                            Cathy aka The Attached Mama
                            2019-2020
                            DS 12, 7th Grade
                            DD 11, 6th Grade
                            DS 5, K

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                              #15
                              Cathy,

                              This new schedule looks nice and doable! Good job!

                              Tanya

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