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    Two students in 3rd. Duplicate books?

    In January, my two students will be doing Mammals (or perhaps Astronomy), Christian Studies, Greek Myths, Poetry, EGR, ATFF, and Latina Christiana together. Math, Spelling, and Lit will be separate. In addition to the consumer items, would it benefit us to have two copies of any of the text books, D’Aulaire’s Greek Myths, for example? Also, I see that it appears to have a new black cover, whereas the copy I picked up at a garage sale has a yellow cover. I’m hoping I don’t have the wrong edition! My oldest is currently doing the Moffats lit guide with an older edition copy of The Moffats; she hates how the page numbers don’t line up!

    #2
    Originally posted by alihuyoung View Post
    In January, my two students will be doing Mammals (or perhaps Astronomy), Christian Studies, Greek Myths, Poetry, EGR, ATFF, and Latina Christiana together. Math, Spelling, and Lit will be separate. In addition to the consumer items, would it benefit us to have two copies of any of the text books, D’Aulaire’s Greek Myths, for example? Also, I see that it appears to have a new black cover, whereas the copy I picked up at a garage sale has a yellow cover. I’m hoping I don’t have the wrong edition! My oldest is currently doing the Moffats lit guide with an older edition copy of The Moffats; she hates how the page numbers don’t line up!
    Good evening,

    When the publisher of D’Aulaires' Book of Greek Myths updated the cover to a gorgeous black, they did not change the inside text, illustrations, or page numbers, though they did add an Afterword about the authors.

    HTH!
    Michael
    Memoria Press

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by alihuyoung View Post
      In January, my two students will be doing Mammals (or perhaps Astronomy), Christian Studies, Greek Myths, Poetry, EGR, ATFF, and Latina Christiana together. Math, Spelling, and Lit will be separate. In addition to the consumer items, would it benefit us to have two copies of any of the text books, D’Aulaire’s Greek Myths, for example? Also, I see that it appears to have a new black cover, whereas the copy I picked up at a garage sale has a yellow cover. I’m hoping I don’t have the wrong edition! My oldest is currently doing the Moffats lit guide with an older edition copy of The Moffats; she hates how the page numbers don’t line up!
      Welcome!

      In our homeschool, each student gets a fresh copy of the text --- Novels, Classical Studies, etc. I also have my own copy of the book as well --- which is usually an old copy that my 8th grader used previously.

      For us, it would be a gigantic pain in the rear to have to share novels or classical studies texts. We read the literature chapters together at home, in a bit of a round robin style. We all have our copy, and whoever is not reading has to stay on track, following along.

      My bookshelf is a bit crowded, but I'll save these novels and pass them on to my children when they move out. You know. Many years from now.
      Plans for 2019-20

      DD1 - 24 - College Grad and rocking her own bakery business
      DD2 - 13 - 8A Louisville HLS Cottage School and MPOA
      DS3 - 11 - 4A Louisville HLS Cottage School
      DS4 - 11 - 4A Louisville HLS Cottage School
      DD5 - 7 - MP2, Louisville HLS Cottage School
      DS6 - 5 - MP K

      [url]www.thekennedyadventures.com/all-about-our-memoria-press-homeschool[/url]

      Comment


        #4
        I'm thinking about this too. I'm thinking when I get to the bigger novels in 2nd, I'm going to go ahead and purchase those again for my new 2nd grader. His older brother and I made all kinds of notes and highlights and underlines, etc. I think those techniques are great for individual study, but it might distract from a fresh set of eyes on the page in another year. I've tried using one book before (before MP) and it just didn't go very well.
        Melissa

        DS (MP3) - 9
        DS (MP2) - 7/8
        DS (K) - 6
        DD (Adorable distraction) 2 1/2

        Comment


          #5
          I will offer you the cost-saving advice of saying that we have always been able to get by with one set of books. None of my kids write in their books. I have given them the option, especially the older ones who have read “How to Read a Book,” but they, like me, cannot stand the thought of writing in a book. So all of our books remain ready to go for the next person.

          Also, this is the first time I have two children using the same subjects at the same time and we are still not needing a second book. We have been working on a subject or two at the same time, but even that is quickly coming to the end and we are only 4 weeks into the year. There is just so much of a temptation to compare/compete between kids that it is nicer for everyone if we work on things individually rather than together as a group.

          It is possible to get by with one main set of books!

          AMDG,
          Sarah
          2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
          DD, 19, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
          DS, 16
          DD, 14
          DD, 12
          DD, 10
          DD, 8
          DD, 6
          +DS+
          DS, 2

          Comment


            #6
            It’s good to hear that we can get by either way! We have a hard time writing in books, too, so I don’t think that will be an issue. I guess if I happen to come across a few duplicates, it won’t hurt to pick them up, but I won’t stress over it too much.

            Comment


              #7
              A book always knows when I've read it.

              There's marks, underlines, sometimes highlights, creases, corner folds, and the ever present spin bending. If "it's a gooder" the spine will have been broken systematically all the way until the end. This never bothered me because even when my eyes fall on the book, I smile at the creases - kind of a there and back again feel. I feel sorry for the book, but only as much as I feel sorry for my car after going on a road trip with the family. You know how you get the car immaculately clean before a road trip, but you're not on the road an hour before someone (often me) drops the goldfish on the floor? By the time you finish the trip, the car is well traveled, and although you can clean up the mess, those miles are permanently there and etched into the memory of the car. Like my car, I love my books to show mileage.

              I never understood how some people could read a book and it still looks brand new. I mean it literally fascinates me how that is done because I truly have no idea how that is even possible - especially with a paperback novel. Do you not even push the sides of the book down as you read it? How is spine bending avoided at all. I am actually being serious here. I truly don't know how you read a paperback and it still look immaculate at the end. At least with hardback novels, the spine is hidden and it will often lay open from the weight of the cover. I get how you don't have to mark in it or fold corners, but how does one actually hold open a paperback novel and not bend that spine even once? Especially for a big novel?

              Melissa

              DS (MP3) - 9
              DS (MP2) - 7/8
              DS (K) - 6
              DD (Adorable distraction) 2 1/2

              Comment


                #8
                I think it depends on how you operate. Do you do these subjects together or do they work independently? I have one in 6A and one in 7, so many subjects are shared. I have been buying duplicate books, but whether they get used depends on how we do that subject. We have 3 copies of each book for literature because we read round robin. We have two copies of each textbook for the Forms Series because I like for them each to have their own copy (but that won't be an issue for you until you start the Forms). We also have two copies of science, classical and modern, but we could easily have made due with one.
                DD 10th
                DS 7th
                DD 6th

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by MBentley View Post
                  A book always knows when I've read it.

                  There's marks, underlines, sometimes highlights, creases, corner folds, and the ever present spin bending. If "it's a gooder" the spine will have been broken systematically all the way until the end. This never bothered me because even when my eyes fall on the book, I smile at the creases - kind of a there and back again feel. I feel sorry for the book, but only as much as I feel sorry for my car after going on a road trip with the family. You know how you get the car immaculately clean before a road trip, but you're not on the road an hour before someone (often me) drops the goldfish on the floor? By the time you finish the trip, the car is well traveled, and although you can clean up the mess, those miles are permanently there and etched into the memory of the car. Like my car, I love my books to show mileage.

                  I never understood how some people could read a book and it still looks brand new. I mean it literally fascinates me how that is done because I truly have no idea how that is even possible - especially with a paperback novel. Do you not even push the sides of the book down as you read it? How is spine bending avoided at all. I am actually being serious here. I truly don't know how you read a paperback and it still look immaculate at the end. At least with hardback novels, the spine is hidden and it will often lay open from the weight of the cover. I get how you don't have to mark in it or fold corners, but how does one actually hold open a paperback novel and not bend that spine even once? Especially for a big novel?
                  I also don’t know if it’s possible to read a paperback without cracking the spine even a little bit, but as far as how well-traveled the book becomes, I think it’s just a matter of personal taste and/or habit. I don’t think any of our books are less loved just because they are still in pretty nice condition. I know we all experience the full impact of a book because we talk about the way different paper feels, whether a book smells right, whether it is a pleasure to read or not, and whether we need a new copy of something just because the appearance of one we have does not match up with our “idea” of the book. My oldest child actually bought herself a new copy of a book simply because she loved the cover of one she saw at B&N. We LOVE our books too. But the way we express that love is simply the reverse of you, I guess. We love them so much that they are well-cared for, if that makes sense. Not saying one way is better than another, just that it is different. My kids would be horrified to write in a Tolkien, a Dickens, or a Bronte. It would not seem respectful to the book and they just wouldn’t do it. This is the root of our dislike for writing in books at all.

                  With that being said, we have a set of LOTR paperbacks that are worn to the point of papers falling out and covers falling off - but it is because between our four oldest kids, those books have been read about a hundred times. I even bought a new set, but they prefer the falling apart ones because each time they read them again, it’s the same experience because it’s the same copy.

                  Different ways of expressing the same thing, you know?

                  AMDG,
                  Sarah
                  2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
                  DD, 19, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
                  DS, 16
                  DD, 14
                  DD, 12
                  DD, 10
                  DD, 8
                  DD, 6
                  +DS+
                  DS, 2

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by KF2000 View Post

                    I also don’t know if it’s possible to read a paperback without cracking the spine even a little bit, but as far as how well-traveled the book becomes, I think it’s just a matter of personal taste and/or habit. I don’t think any of our books are less loved just because they are still in pretty nice condition. I know we all experience the full impact of a book because we talk about the way different paper feels, whether a book smells right, whether it is a pleasure to read or not, and whether we need a new copy of something just because the appearance of one we have does not match up with our “idea” of the book. My oldest child actually bought herself a new copy of a book simply because she loved the cover of one she saw at B&N. We LOVE our books too. But the way we express that love is simply the reverse of you, I guess. We love them so much that they are well-cared for, if that makes sense. Not saying one way is better than another, just that it is different. My kids would be horrified to write in a Tolkien, a Dickens, or a Bronte. It would not seem respectful to the book and they just wouldn’t do it. This is the root of our dislike for writing in books at all.

                    With that being said, we have a set of LOTR paperbacks that are worn to the point of papers falling out and covers falling off - but it is because between our four oldest kids, those books have been read about a hundred times. I even bought a new set, but they prefer the falling apart ones because each time they read them again, it’s the same experience because it’s the same copy.

                    Different ways of expressing the same thing, you know?

                    AMDG,
                    Sarah
                    Yikes Mea culpa. I'm not saying that the better they are taken care of the less they are loved. The opposite is likely true. You take care of things you treasure so that they last. Only I simply don't know how to do it with a book and actually read the thing! It's more of awe on my part that you are able to do it at all. I've had to switch to hardback books because I'm so rough on them - I think my 2 year old is better at preserving them than I am. It's one of those things where you just don't understand how someone else does it but it must be obvious to a lot of people because so many people are pretty good at it. All of my high school friends learned to never lend me a book they loved because it came back warped. When they lent it to me, gushing over it, the book looked as if it came off the Barnes & Noble Shelf having never been touched. I do not know how that was even possible.

                    Funny related story:
                    I have comic books from when I was a kid (ahem....okay I didn't even start reading them until 13, but that's beside the point). My husband laughs every time we move because somehow he always gets that opaque box that weighs a ton and when he finally reaches frustration level, he opens it up and sees these comics that I've made us move over and over for 22 years. He laughs because although technically, they should be worth something - and several of them quite a lot - they just aren't because I nearly destroyed them reading them in my youth. Destroyed them. And I loved them to pieces. It doesn't matter that I store them "properly" as a preserved comic should be stored. I destroyed them in reading. He has quit trying to get rid of them and now they are a point of funny in any move. I told him they are memories with texture and you just don't throw textured memories away. He loves my weird.

                    So...my books look as if they traveled every mile with Bilbo on the trip, and yours probably look as if they've been read by a 100 elves in Rivendell - both a treasure.
                    Melissa

                    DS (MP3) - 9
                    DS (MP2) - 7/8
                    DS (K) - 6
                    DD (Adorable distraction) 2 1/2

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Ha! Like the ending comparison there. Yes, my kids would probably all - across the board - come down on the side of elves rather than hobbits. Those are their favorite characters. That’s so funny to think about!


                      AMDG,
                      Sarah
                      2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
                      DD, 19, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
                      DS, 16
                      DD, 14
                      DD, 12
                      DD, 10
                      DD, 8
                      DD, 6
                      +DS+
                      DS, 2

                      Comment

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