Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How to place a new student

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    How to place a new student

    Our 12 y.o. son asked 2 weeks before school started last year if he could homeschool. So last year was a bit of a slow start as he had/has many gaps and I haven't taught for 12 years. We started with Ancient History and Old Testament. History of Science along with some Chemistry. Math U see which is very thorough and the gaps were mostly in math due to common core in the public school. His writing is poor, and he reads at a very high level.
    He's interested in learning Greek, we might be able to travel there, and I wonder if this Greek is modern Greek? Could we learn enough to help with travels? I have the books on Famous Men of Greece and Rome, and we were going to study those times in history and work into the middle ages this year.
    I'm really looking for direction on how to place him in the various subjects. He will thrive on the structure, and I will be stressed at following someone else's plan, but I know that it will be good for me. Thanks for any ideas!!!

    #2
    I do know that Koine (Biblical Greek) is not modern Greek. It doesn't even use all the same characters. The emphasis on foreign languages in MP (Latin and Greek) is as a means to understand English grammar and derivatives, as a method of ordering the mind for higher studies, and as a way to read the classics of Western literature in their original languages. A visit to Greece would be enhanced beautifully by learning about FMOG, Greek Mythology and MP's Greek. You'll have to ask whether he needs to do a slow intro via Elementary Greek or whether he could hop into an upper level for middle school and up.
    Mama to 2, Married 17 years

    SY 19/20
    DD 8-3A
    DS 5-SC C

    Comment


      #3
      Yes, I've wondered the same thing for Latin, which seems to be recommended first. If it's better to start with the younger class, or jump into the beginner upper classes. There's Prima Latina, Latina Christiana, and then First Form Latin...Any ideas on how to place a student?

      Also, do we do two history classes? Looking at the Core Curriculum I see American/Modern and Classical (Men of the Middle Ages).

      Maybe chronological study isn't used in Memoria Press since they have Romans before Greeks?(Grade 6 and 7).

      Sorry this sounds so scattered, that's how I'm feeling though. I'm trying to decide between a Classical approach (which seems very solid) or a Living Books approach (which is how I naturally think).
      Continued thanks for ideas!!!

      Comment


        #4
        We did a year of eclectic with CM. It felt so good, yet my eldest couldn't tell me a thing about what we learned by the end of it. We have experienced the joy of a true knowledge base since we transitioned to MP. With that said, American Studies supplemental readers will feel very CM in that the books start off as biographies and stories about the era of study. The questions in the study guides are way better at honing in on key topics vs. just reading the books. Even as a former English teacher who has run through MP1 & MP2 Enrichment, I found the discussion questions quick and to hit the right themes. My daughter found she wasn't reading (or listening when I read them aloud) carefully enough to remember certain details if we waited to the end. It forced her to read and listen more attentively. My 6th grade niece just visited and bragged about how fast she could blow through a book. That is the major hurdle facing kids today: to slow down to take in and think about key ideas. So, yeah, it's kind of like 2 tracks, but my kids do it so well. Another idea is to do the readers over the summer with the guide. We knocked out all of ours this way, and then throughout the year I will assign them as independent reading. Lest you think this is crazy, my eldest loves these American history books.
        Mama to 2, Married 17 years

        SY 19/20
        DD 8-3A
        DS 5-SC C

        Comment


          #5
          Hello and Welcome, Momjean!

          Sounds like you are trying to decide on something around the 6th or 7th grade core, but with some adjustments for where your son is in certain things. I will hit your questions first, and then tell you what I think might be a good plan for him.

          First, Enbateau is correct about Greek, and her explanation of why we study it is on target. You are also correct in that usually students study Latin for several years, learning the grammatical foundation of an inflected language, before adding Greek in as well. Because of this expectation, the MP programs are set up to follow each other nicely. The First Form Greek program introduces children to the same initial grammar concepts they have already covered through the Latin Forms series. That makes it a very smooth first Greek course. Usually we recommend starting with the Greek Alphabet program while a child is in Third Form Latin, and then doing Fourth Form Latin with First Form Greek. That seems to work very well. But this does not mean that you cannot follow your son's interest either. You could do Greek Alphabet this year, followed by the Elementary Greek program.

          As for Latin, the Prima and Latina courses are great introductions that are geared toward younger students. Your son is old enough that he would not need such a gentle introduction. Starting in First Form Latin would present him with a more age-appropriate place to begin and hold his interest better than the slower pace of Prima and Latina.

          Then you asked about history - both how it appears to have two tracks, and also that it appears to not be chronological. You are correct on both points, but there's a bit more to it. MP emphasizes studying the three cultures that make up the foundation of Western civilization - Greek, Roman, and Hebrew. To do this, children continually study something from each of these cultures, which is why you see a course in Classical studies and Christian studies every year. Yet children also need preparation to know their own culture and world, which is why we include a Modern Studies vein as well - using Geography, American History novels, and a targeted American History course in the 7th grade core. The aim is to dribble this content in all throughout their education so they gradually increase their depth of understanding for the most important material over many years, rather than hitting a ton of material once every four years. Yet not all historical material is age-appropriate for children. For instance, the history of Greece is much more convoluted and messy compared to Rome....so we study Rome first because there is so much that younger children can understand better. Similarly, most children LOVE Medieval history, and can understand it a lot better than Greek history. So again, we do Middle Ages before Greece. This is one really good example of how carefully MP has thought out their curriculum path, and I can tell you from experience, they nailed it.

          So, with all this being said, what to do for next year?
          Well, I think a good place for your son might be to focus on those 6th and 7th grade cores, and decide which you think would be more interesting to him. Either way you go, he will get a great start to a full MP program. Take a look at the literature books and see which you think would be better for him this year. Would Middle Ages be a better first history course for him, or do you want to follow his interest and get right into Famous Men of Greece? From your description, I would suggest the 7th grade core, but one thing you might want to do is look at the 8th grade core and see if you think he would be ready for those literature and Classical studies books in a year, or whether you might want to give him two years before getting there. That's a personal call on your part, I think.

          To give you an example, if you chose 7th, you would have several pieces of the curriculum to use as listed, with a pretty equal amount of substitutions. But keep in mind that if you order a full core, you can make a substitution for any level of what you need in Latin, Composition, Grammar, etc, and MP will provide you with the individual lesson plan for the level you need. What this would look like is that you would have a curriculum guide for about half of the subjects, and then a few separate LP's for the rest. Many of us have to do this for our kids in 7th and up anyway because kids get all over the place in their levels of things. You can have your student use a blank student planner to transfer all the material from the CG and the LP's into one place to be more convenient, either all at once before the year begins, or week-by-week as you go. It still ends up being convenient because everything is all planned for you.

          Okay, so here's a suggestion using the Seventh Grade Core Curriuculum as a base:
          American History course - 200 Questions, 13 Colonies and Great Republic
          Famous Men of Greece
          Book of Trees / Exploring the History of Biology
          Seventh Grade Literature
          Greek Alphabet

          First Form Latin (substitution)
          English Grammar Recitation 1 with Core Skills (substitution)
          Classical Composition Fable and Narrative (combined year - substitution)
          Math - either use the Prealgebra that comes in the set, or continue with Math U See
          Christian Studies - This core uses Book IV, which is an overview of the entire Bible. You can use it even without having completed I-III, but it will be a lot to cover. Another option is to substitute Christian Studies III, which is NT since you said he did OT last year.

          How does that look to you?

          AMDG,
          Sarah
          Last edited by KF2000; 07-20-2019, 09:40 AM.
          2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
          DD, 18, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
          DS, 16
          DD, 14
          DD, 12
          DD, 10
          DD, 7.5
          DD, 5.5
          +DS+
          DS, 18 months

          Comment


            #6
            Thank you KF2000,
            From what I see, are the Memoria Press products designed to be used all together? I've ordered the First Form Latin and the Fable and Narrative portion. I also ordered Adam of the Road set to see how it looks like we could fit into the literature portion. We are in the midst of Ancient History and I want to keep that study up. Are the Christian Studies like a Bible study? Is it possible to get a lesson plan book of some form to know how to proceed with the various subjects and how they fit together? I'm kind of overwhelmed with all the subjects...

            Comment


              #7
              The MP curriculum is designed to be a full, complete educational option for homeschoolers. It is based on the curriculum of the Highlands Latin School in Louisville, Kentucky, where the curriculum has been developed and field-tested in actual classrooms with dedicated, highly-educated teachers. So yes, in the sense that I think you are asking, it is designed to provide a full, rich, complete path in which children build their educational foundation step-by-step from one year to the next. But with that being said, there is still flexibility to place a child where he or she needs to be in each given content area. That is why I suggested the adjustments that I did. The plan gives your son some things that he would probably be ready to do because of his age, while also helping him start at the beginning of the things that are skill-dependent, not age-dependent.

              But that does not mean that you cannot take one part of it that appeals to you and begin with just that one piece. That is what I did back in the beginning. I actually chose two: Latin and Math. Then, halfway through that first year, I added two literature guides, which we did orally. With each new course I added, I realized more and more the quality of education that MP had developed and was gradually converted to using the full curriculum.

              The Christian Studies program of study covers the history of the Hebrew people and several important works of Christianity. In the specific courses for Christian Studies I - IV, children study the historical basis of Scripture. This is not the same as what many people think of as "Bible study." It's not teaching the doctrine of the Bible, as people in a Bible Study group will often do. It is the study of Scripture in a historical context. This allows each family to add appropriate amounts of doctrine according to their own faith perspective. Then after Christian Studies IV, the program continues with the Book of the Ancient World (which covers the history of the Jews along with the other cultures of that time), the Story of Christianity (which is an overview of the development of the Christian religion), the Wars of the Jews and the Acts of the Apostles (more history), followed by reading specific Christian classics. Does that answer your question?

              One way you can see an overview of the course of study is included in the Classical Teacher magalog published by MP. They always have a fold-out section that shows how each thread of study progresses. That might be helpful to you. You can view the magalog online on the website (https://www.memoriapress.com/classical-catalog/) or you can sign up to receive it at home if you don't already. Is that what you are looking for?

              AMDG,
              Sarah
              Last edited by KF2000; 07-22-2019, 10:30 AM.
              2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
              DD, 18, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
              DS, 16
              DD, 14
              DD, 12
              DD, 10
              DD, 7.5
              DD, 5.5
              +DS+
              DS, 18 months

              Comment


                #8
                Thanks again I got the magalog in the mail recently and have been studying it. There is so much information and connections between the courses, it's a bit overwhelming. I think starting with Latin, literature and Fable might be as far as I can jump in at the start. That's good to know that the Christian Studies are studying the Bible as history.
                Thank you for all your help!!! Blessings

                Comment


                  #9
                  I think the idea of picking a couple things and adjusting gradually is fantastic. Glad I could be helpful and make sure to keep asking any questions as they come along!

                  AMDG,
                  Sarah
                  2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
                  DD, 18, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
                  DS, 16
                  DD, 14
                  DD, 12
                  DD, 10
                  DD, 7.5
                  DD, 5.5
                  +DS+
                  DS, 18 months

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X