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    Spelling program question

    Hi,
    I'm in the process of transitioning from Abeka language workbooks to Memoria Press. I've been purchasing MP materials in stages so I can get the hang of one thing before starting something else new, and I'm at the point where I'm considering getting rid of the Abeka language workbooks entirely, but there is one thing that they do that I haven't seen yet in the MP materials I've purchased: does MP have children practice changing endings on words? Like dig/digs/digging, pony/ponies, fan/fans/fanning/fanned, etc? Some of my kids struggle with learning, so I can't assume that they'll pick anything up "on their own," things have to be presented to them deliberately and frequently to get it to stick.

    If MP does cover that sort of thing, which book is it in? Does it give enough structure and repetition for slower learners to get enough practice? Or should I keep the Abeka workbooks to use those pages?

    Thanks!
    Mom to 12:
    Biological - ages 8, 7, 4, 2, newborn
    Two adopted sibling groups - ages 9, 8, 7 and 7, 6, 4 and 4

    #2
    Having taught ABeka in the past I’m familiar with their language program. Within the MP program I can tell you that plurals of both regular and irregular words is covered thoroughly in the Traditional Spelling program along with the double or drop rule. However, this is not the first time these are covered. The difficulty is in pinpointing all the places they are covered! Students gain familiarity and usage practice from the First Start Reading program of Kindergarten and are seen again in the Phonics lessons for reading as well as within the literature guides. English grammar and language usage are woven and referenced throughout rather than having one focused lesson.

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      #3
      OK, thank you! I figured it would be covered, I just wanted to double check.
      Mom to 12:
      Biological - ages 8, 7, 4, 2, newborn
      Two adopted sibling groups - ages 9, 8, 7 and 7, 6, 4 and 4

      Comment


        #4
        Traditional Spelling 2 definitely has the double the final consonant when the word ends in a single vowel and single consonant of a stressed syllable. The reason you won't see a rule like that in K is because it's still an emerging skill to get students to know what is a vowel, what is a consonant...and what is a stressed syllable! The recitation in MP1 and MP2 introduces some memory work for the parts of speech, and it's reiterated in the Prima Latina, polished in Traditional Spelling 2 through spelling and now with the addition of the Grammar Practice Sheets that accompany TS. Lesson 26 goes over that rule more specifically, and Lesson 24 introduces adding -s vs. -es when the word hisses or changes (likes from ending in -lf of calf to -lves of calves). Lesson 21 covers adding -y to words ending in consonants or r-controlled vowel teams (like thirsty vs blurry). A great activity embedded into Traditional Spelling is to come up with rhyming words that employ the same spelling rules and use those words in sentences that the student comes up with alongside the teacher. It was a great activity for my eldest to apply the rule to multiple words in her lexicon. So, in a way, there is a bit of that all throughout Traditional Spelling. I have not taught Traditional Spelling 1, but a child's ability to apply this rule to other words might be hit or miss at the age anyway.

        Enjoy!
        Mama to 2

        Summer:
        MPK with SC1 Phonics & Math
        SY 20/21
        4A

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