Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Left-Handed Children- Does MP Kindergarten Accomodate?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Left-Handed Children- Does MP Kindergarten Accomodate?

    Are the hand-writing/scissors/et.al instructions portions of the Junior K and K curriculum accommodating to left-handed children, or does it presuppose being right-handed? Are there appropriate diagrams for left-handed and right-handed writing? Differing stroke letter-formation techniques or is everything uniform? This may be a silly question but I'm right-handed with no experience with instructing lefties and my DS favors his left-hand. Should I anticipate needing to make any special arrangements for the handwriting-instruction, such as how to hold the paper, angle, formation of letters, etc.? Thanks!

    #2
    There will be pictures of correct pencil grip and paper position for both left and right-handed students. However the instructions for how to teach strokes will be the same. In my experience correct paper position is VERY important for that left-hand writer otherwise you will get what I call a "wrist wrapper." They will also wrench their neck around to see what they are writing. So teach them how to position their paper correctly, instructions for which are in the Copybook and NAC introductory pages. My lefties were taught to be sure the corner of their paper was pointing toward their heart. Then I watched like a hawk to ensure the page didn't migrate. Handwriting teachers for Jr. K, K, 1st, and 2nd grades need to be vigilant about the 3 P's EVERYTIME the student picks up their pencil to write.

    Comment


      #3
      I am right handed myself. Hubby too. Somehow, we have created 3 left handed kids (including the baby) and a right handed one.

      So far, I'm not finding much in the way of help for learning how to write if you are left handed - either inside MP or outside of it. I've even used Handwriting without tears. Other than "how to hold the pencil", there isn't much out there.

      One thing I've noticed is that where there are circle shapes (like the letter "o"), they will be more comfortable drawing it "backwards" or clockwise. There aren't many modifications. Pencil grip is the big thing - mostly because as we move across the page, the left hand gets in the way of visibility. Think about copying a sentence. Often, part of the left arm or hand covers up what you are copying so you have to completely remove your hand from the page to glance back at what you are copying. Right handed students continually move their hand and arm away from the material on the page while lefties gradually cover the page. There's not a lot that can be done for it that I've found. Basically, I relax the requirement of "how" they form the letters so long as they continually look nice.

      To help with pencil grip and to keep the arm and hand from forming an over the top of the page grip, I use these for about half a year or more.

      https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

      Ironically, my oldest lefty has some amazing cursive handwriting. My right handed kiddo is actually having pencil grip issues and even though he is in second grade, I put these grips back on to help him correct his grip again.
      Melissa

      DS (MP3) - 9
      DS (MP2) - 7/8
      DS (K) - 6
      DD (Adorable distraction) 2 1/2

      Comment


        #4
        Yes and no. I'm the mom of a leftie son and am plowing through the SC B and C (slower pace of Jr. K) with great success and delight. The Rod & Staff books seem to take a right-handed approach to zeros in number formation, but their cutting isn't frustrating like Kumon books, which are 100% right-handed approach. Regardless, the samples and arrows are so few that you can tell your child to do whatever you want. The Copybooks are the best, as they have slant, grip, etc directions for lefties. New American Cursive is great, too, but that's not scheduled til MP1.

        The Numbers Coloring Books in Jr. K are great and don't take an approach to letter formation. The Numbers Books and Alphabet Books, as well as FSR (First Start Reading) has their O go backwards for lefties, but once again, on a single page there is one arrow, and I can't think of a single letter other than O that is hard for a leftie to make or that should be made differently. FSR also has plenty of left and right hand directions for paper position, posture, and grip, as well as slant (in cursive), size and spacing on p. 13/14 and a chart/picture of a leftie writing with proper grip and paper position on p. 316. I imagine the rightie picture on p. 318 can be reverse copied.
        Mama to 2

        Summer:
        MPK with SC1 Phonics & Math
        SY 20/21
        4A

        Comment


          #5
          I just finished teaching kindergarten to my Lefty. A couple of things ..

          Don't overthink this. There's nothing special about a lefty, how they form letters, etc. The only difference is they use a different hand. That's all.

          MP I think is very lefty friendly. A lot of the words to copy are printed above the blank spot, allowing a lefty to see the word. I think there were a few FSR pages where the child wrote to the right of the word, but very few.

          Don't expect your lefty to be totally left-handed. My daughter scissors with her right, but bats left-handed. We're still trying to determine whether she throws more accurately right or left.

          I think us righties are terrified to teach a lefty. As Michelle T said, paper placement is important. So is pencil grip. A lefty holds the pencil higher up the barrel. Noticebly higher than a right. I would say a pinky width above the pencil sharpened spot (like where they pencil edge is shaved, where you can see the actual wood). We twisted a tiny rubber band around the pencil in that spot for my daughter to learn where to hold it.

          Be on the lookout for the bent wrist or chicken wing. That means their hand isn't high enough up the barrel. They bend their wrist or exaggerate their Elbow in order to see what they're writing.

          At the completion of k, my daughter has nice, confident handwriting.
          Married to DH for 14 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

          DS11- Simply Classical 5/6
          DD9- Simply Classical 5/6 (neurotypical, but schooling with big brother to save mom's sanity)
          DD 6- Classic Core First Grade

          We've completed:
          Classic Core Jr. kindergarten, kindergarten, first grade, and second grade.
          Simply Classical levels B, C, 1, 2, 3, and 4.

          Comment


            #6
            My son's OT also has him using a slant board, which helps keep the wrist at the correct angle. Like Michelle said about paper, the corner goes at the heart or bellybutton.

            These are my favorite pencil grips because they make the middle finger curl under the pencil. The Claw are my second favorite, but they hold the fingers in a more immature grip (no curl). Our OT was very impressed when I showed her these for that reason.

            https://www.amazon.com/Firesara-Orig...-1-spons&psc=1
            Cheryl, mom to:

            ds 24, graduated
            ds 23, graduated
            dd 15, 9th Grade
            dd 12, 6th Grade
            ds 10, 4nd Grade

            Comment


              #7
              I will add, follow the directional arrows in letter formation. A lefty doesn't have to form them backwards or some other way. This will become important when you move to cursive in first grade. If the child is unfamiliar with correctly forming print o shapes (o, q, p, d, b) forming them in cursive will be more difficult than necessary.
              Married to DH for 14 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

              DS11- Simply Classical 5/6
              DD9- Simply Classical 5/6 (neurotypical, but schooling with big brother to save mom's sanity)
              DD 6- Classic Core First Grade

              We've completed:
              Classic Core Jr. kindergarten, kindergarten, first grade, and second grade.
              Simply Classical levels B, C, 1, 2, 3, and 4.

              Comment

              Working...
              X