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    Please help me understand 3rd grade history...

    Hello - I am interested in Memoria Press 3rd grade history, but I'm having trouble understanding all of the components. Is it just the Stories for Little Americans book and the supplemental reading set? Thanks in advance!

    #2
    Happy to help...but there are a few things to clarify from your question. The Stories of Great Americans for Little Americans is a book used in Second Grade, which is still a Primary-level grade. Students in third grade begin a Grammar-level path of study that will continue throughout the rest of their curriculum. In this path of study, each year they have a course in Classical Studies, a course in Geography/Modern Studies (that does include American history in some grades), and a course in Christian Studies. This way they are covering multiple strands of “history” each year. Plus, MP also has novels dedicated to American history for all of Grammar school too.

    How this looks for third grade is that students start Greek Myths (Classical Studies), Christian Studies I, and States and Capitals (Modern/Geography), along with the set of 3rd grade novels for American History. All of this fits into the general category of “history.”

    Does this help?

    AMDG,
    Sarah
    2020-2021
    16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
    DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
    DS, 16
    DD, 14
    DD, 12
    DD, 10
    DD, 8
    DD, 6
    +DS+
    DS, 2

    Comment


      #3
      Hi ,
      I just posted a bit about what we are in the process of doing concerning American History at this level if that is what you are asking about, just American History? Third Grade American Studies is a States& Capitals study , the scheduled AH novels that has a book of oral comprehension questions for the teacher to ask the student after reading . The SC3 curriculum also has a 3 rd grade American History set that comes with an enrichment guide and a composition book if you chose that route . Greek Myths and Christian Studies1 start you off on the Ancient History path in this curriculum . I also just posted that I added in the 200 American History drill questions to our SC3 study but that just might add in confusion at the moment!

      Comment


        #4
        Great explanation, Sarah. I will add that the supplemental history readers and questions were not included when my first two went through the cores so we've never done them formally. If you are tight on time doing a full core they are an easy thing to cut out. I bought the books and put them on the shelves to read. They have been lovely as free reading.
        Festina lentē,
        Jessica P

        2020-2021
        11th year HSing · 9th year MP
        @ Home, HLN, & Latin online
        11th, 9th, 6th, 3rd

        Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

        Comment


          #5
          I LOVE Sarah’s explanation! It’s important to note they aren’t formally studying American history in 3rd. They are formally studying US geography. A formal study of US history comes in 7th. In grades 3-6, MP offer a *supplemental* US history reader set. All it is is reading a few “living history” books and answering some basic questions. It’s meant as an introduction to some of the stories of US history and is not meant to be a history curriculum.
          Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
          DD, 25, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
          DS, 23, BS '18 mechanical engineering
          DS, 21, chemistry major
          DS, 18, Physics major
          DD, 15, dyslexic, 10th grade customizednMP plus co-op
          DS, 12, super squirmy, possible dysgraphia, MP 7A
          DD, 6 , K- finally one who seems to like drawing and writing- first one since my oldest!

          Comment


            #6
            We are doing the MP3 American History Supplemental Readers this spring to pare down our schedule next year, and it has provided some amazing launch points. Reading the Laura Ingalls Wilder biography sent us to books about covered wagons, prairie living and some awesome Queen's Treasures accessories for American Girl dolls ala LHOTP. The Helen Keller bio launched an obsession with my DD learning sign language and mastering the ASL alphabet. We watched YouTube videos showing Keller speaking to packed audiences, tours of the home in which she grew up, and watched the 1962 Patty Duke version of The Miracle Worker (not a dry eye during the water scene). The Clara Barton bio took us to books on Abe Lincloln, smallpox, the Civil War, and plans to tour the Missing Soldiers Museum in DC this summer. The Thomas Jefferson bio took us on a field trip to Monticello and numerous other kid books on Jefferson's governing philosophy. The Cabin Faced West tied in great with a trip to a Lewis & Clark plant specimen living museum (and Monticello's artifacts), prompted a trip to Mt. Vernon, and later the Washington bio (among many other George picture books). My DD really enjoyed the Columbus bio, and we got to have a thoughtful conversation about all the monuments and art of him that are being taken down. I am so impressed at the age appropriateness of the AHS books. Three times now my DD has picked one of these readers off the shelf and reread it from cover to cover. If your child reads for leisure anyway, make these what s/he reads. I never in a million years would have picked any of these myself, and they're very difficult to find at libraries or books stores. You won't be disappointed. We bought the guide to go with it. I read it through before we read the book so I can guide discussion as I read it to her.
            Mama to 2

            Summer:
            MPK with SC1 Phonics & Math
            SY 20/21
            4A

            Comment


              #7
              Wow! I love to hear that story!!! That is one thing i love about MP- it is a solid curriculum where you know they are working on core skills and knowledge but it still leaves plenty of time and energy to explore rabbit trails as they come up.
              Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
              DD, 25, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
              DS, 23, BS '18 mechanical engineering
              DS, 21, chemistry major
              DS, 18, Physics major
              DD, 15, dyslexic, 10th grade customizednMP plus co-op
              DS, 12, super squirmy, possible dysgraphia, MP 7A
              DD, 6 , K- finally one who seems to like drawing and writing- first one since my oldest!

              Comment


                #8
                Thank you for the helpful explanations!

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by enbateau View Post
                  We are doing the MP3 American History Supplemental Readers this spring to pare down our schedule next year, and it has provided some amazing launch points. Reading the Laura Ingalls Wilder biography sent us to books about covered wagons, prairie living and some awesome Queen's Treasures accessories for American Girl dolls ala LHOTP. The Helen Keller bio launched an obsession with my DD learning sign language and mastering the ASL alphabet. We watched YouTube videos showing Keller speaking to packed audiences, tours of the home in which she grew up, and watched the 1962 Patty Duke version of The Miracle Worker (not a dry eye during the water scene). The Clara Barton bio took us to books on Abe Lincloln, smallpox, the Civil War, and plans to tour the Missing Soldiers Museum in DC this summer. The Thomas Jefferson bio took us on a field trip to Monticello and numerous other kid books on Jefferson's governing philosophy. The Cabin Faced West tied in great with a trip to a Lewis & Clark plant specimen living museum (and Monticello's artifacts), prompted a trip to Mt. Vernon, and later the Washington bio (among many other George picture books). My DD really enjoyed the Columbus bio, and we got to have a thoughtful conversation about all the monuments and art of him that are being taken down. I am so impressed at the age appropriateness of the AHS books. Three times now my DD has picked one of these readers off the shelf and reread it from cover to cover. If your child reads for leisure anyway, make these what s/he reads. I never in a million years would have picked any of these myself, and they're very difficult to find at libraries or books stores. You won't be disappointed. We bought the guide to go with it. I read it through before we read the book so I can guide discussion as I read it to her.
                  This is so encouraging to hear! We are postponing 3rd grade Greek Myths for my rising third grade (she'll essentially do 4NU for 4th grade), and focusing mainly on American History. She is a rabbit trail girl and is going to LOVE them! Reading this makes me so excited for her!
                  Mama to 5 Sweet Ones

                  2020-2021:
                  10th grade DS: Mix of MP materials, MPOA, and local classes
                  8th grade DD: 8M and 3rd Form with MPOA
                  6th grade DD: Mostly 6M
                  4th Grade DD: Mostly 4NU
                  3.5 yo DS: Copious amounts of time outside beating on things with sticks; MP Preschool and Mom Extras 2-3 days a week

                  Comment


                    #10
                    That is exactly what we did with our daughter ! We put off Greek Myths for a time and focused on using the American History readers with rabbit trails because our state has somewhat stricter guidelines about how and when to cover American History. We went with the SC3 books so that we could create a beautiful notebook with illustrations. The Draw Write Now books really helped my daughter in the beginning of the year to get ideas & draw historical figures , now she's kind off taken off with it on her own . For Clara Barton on Friday when we 'delve deeply' , she will be reading about Florence Nightingale , and we have been studying healthy& unhealthy bacteria as a go- along health& science unit. I love the trips included in the above posts , my daughter can't wait to get to the Helen Keller book either! I have a few rabbit trails planned out for Greek Myths next year too, I can't help myself !

                    Comment


                      #11
                      So, another great tie in to Hellen Keller has been Alexander Graham Bell, whom she visits in D.C.. We picked up a few books on him and the telephone. That lead to another inventor, Thomas Edison, who invented the phonograph, and phonograph is a vocabulary word in Lesson 19 of All Things Fun & Fascinating in MP3.

                      And I don't know how this was missed, but did anyone notice the connection between The Bears on Hemlock Mountain and the legend of "Thor and the Jotun Aegir" from D'aulaire's Book of Norse Myths? They're both a quest for a really big pot (one big enough for beer, the other big enough for a post-christening supper). ETA: Socrates drank a hemlock tincture as poison when he died. This plant is different from the Hemlock tree. It was interesting to look at examples of both plants.

                      And one more thing: Clara Barton's house in Glen Echo Park, MD is open again Fri & Sat for tours 1-4pm. It's a national park, and free & open to the public. It's unfurnished during restoration, but it might be fun if you're near DC anyway. I heard it has a vault where they kept emergency cash and Red Cross supplies for disaster relief. The Red Cross responded to the San Francisco earthquake of 1906, which makes for a nice tie-in for those who read Maybelle the Cable Car in MP2.
                      Last edited by enbateau; 05-23-2019, 03:54 PM.
                      Mama to 2

                      Summer:
                      MPK with SC1 Phonics & Math
                      SY 20/21
                      4A

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Thank you for all of this fun info! And ,yes , we are covering Alexander Graham Bell and how hearing aids help people hear that we found in the Evan Moore Daily Science sheets that we bought to go along with the enrichment science . Some of the SC3 overlaps with 3A , so we are trying to read all of the books suggested in all manuals in each grade ! Question , has your child l, or anyone else's here, learned the entire Star Spangled Banner? We have the first two full verses down , aren't those the ones usually sung at public events only?

                        Comment


                          #13
                          What you should ask is does anyone even know the first verse? ;-)
                          Mama to 2

                          Summer:
                          MPK with SC1 Phonics & Math
                          SY 20/21
                          4A

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Hilarious!????

                            Comment

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