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    Placement for 7 year old

    Trying to figure out the best placement for my nearly 7 year old. I have been calling him a 1st grader this year but his reading level is not progressing very quickly. We are using AAR level 1 and he is about 3/4 of the way through it. He still really struggles with letter reversals/ confusion confusion though does well with blending overall. his writing is also at a lower level than I might expect would be needed for MP 1.

    He does well in math and is finished with the Singapore first grade math already.

    Would you recommend doing mp1 or one of the simply classical levels?

    I plan to continue with Singapore math.

    #2
    Originally posted by Purestone View Post
    Trying to figure out the best placement for my nearly 7 year old. I have been calling him a 1st grader this year but his reading level is not progressing very quickly. We are using AAR level 1 and he is about 3/4 of the way through it. He still really struggles with letter reversals/ confusion confusion though does well with blending overall. his writing is also at a lower level than I might expect would be needed for MP 1.

    He does well in math and is finished with the Singapore first grade math already.

    Would you recommend doing mp1 or one of the simply classical levels?

    I plan to continue with Singapore math.
    I might consider SC1 phonics. It will repeat some of what he knows, but add the writing component, plus add additional games. In my opinion, having completed all 4 levels of AAR and doing AAR 1-2 two times now, a child needs to complete a good portion of level 2 before beginning MP 1 phonics. If you own level 2 already, my recommendation may be different.
    Christine

    (2019/2020)
    DD1 8/23/09 - SC5/6
    DS2 9/1/11 - SC3,4, 5/6 combo
    DD3 2/9/13 -SC2 to start, MP1 second semester

    Previous Years
    DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3, SC4’
    DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK, SC2)
    DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others, MPK)

    Comment


      #3
      Yeah, there's always the option of pushing through AAR2 over the summer and doing a late September start of MP1. The older he gets, the more ready he will be for MP1. Developmentally, the brain tackles all manner of subjects with more ease as the child gets older. If he doesn't show any signs of special learning needs, I'd lean toward MP1 after a bit more phonics work. The writing is meant to be done together, so as long as he can do some copywork, that's about all the writing he needs to do. Also, I'll make the recommendation to switch to cursive. MP1 does NAC1. It was the best thing for my Kindergartner and first grader. She struggled with letter reversals and horrible gaps. Cursive took what looked like dyslexia and turned my child into a thriving reader and writer by 2nd grader.
      Mama to 2, Married 17 years

      SY 19/20
      DD 8-3A
      DS 5-SC C

      Comment


        #4
        I do not own AAR2, but am willing to purchase it and work through the summer to help prepare him for next year with MP1.

        Comment


          #5
          I am also considering buying the K phonics program and working through that with him this summer starting with where he needs, which will not be right at the beginning. I will have a K student next fall as well so would be fine with buying those materials early.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Purestone View Post
            I am also considering buying the K phonics program and working through that with him this summer starting with where he needs, which will not be right at the beginning. I will have a K student next fall as well so would be fine with buying those materials early.
            That makes a lot more sense. I agree with the pros, too. I always trust their recommendations. They'll know precisely the books from FSR A-D that he should have mastery of before you start on MP1. FWIW, my eldest did an MP1 catch up over the summer before she started her 2nd grade year in MP2. We did phonics and Rod & Staff math (which we love, love, love btw) and the MP1 lit and Enrichment books. Doing one catch up over the summer is a great way to set his feet on solid ground. It worked for us, and we're taking this summer off now.
            Last edited by enbateau; 04-25-2019, 09:24 AM.
            Mama to 2, Married 17 years

            SY 19/20
            DD 8-3A
            DS 5-SC C

            Comment


              #7
              If you feel your child is needing some work prior to beginning first grade, my recommendation has always been to begin with FSR Book 1. The first three books of FSR cover the alphabet with short vowels only. If there is any doubt as to mastery of any consonant sounds, short vowel confusion (i and e most common), blending of CVC words or fluency issues there is great benefit to moving through these first three books to avoid gaps; but, you can move at a faster pace than designed as long as you don't omit any content. By doing this you ensure there are no phonetic gaps and you allow your child to truly master the material. To implement the method you will need FSR student and teacher guides, classical phonics, phonics flashcards and the three phonetic readers (Fun in the Sun, Scamp and Tramp, Soft and White.)

              When you are moving through the material in this manner I don't suggest the Core Skills books, unless you find you require additional written practice, or the EPS Primary Phonics , unless you need additional phonetic reading practice.

              After this your child should be ready to begin 1st grade. Should you have any questions or if there are other issues to consider, please feel free to call the office for individual placement.

              Blessings,

              Comment


                #8
                I agree with Michelle, start at the beginning. The work books are cheap enough.

                One of the major strengths of MP is it's multi-modal teaching. It's not just a matter of reading the words. The workbooks encourage children to write the words. This is where other programs lose some effectiveness, in my opinion, in an effort to make learning 'fun'. The skill of writing; pencil grip, attention to detail, hand strength, and memory all work together to cement the reading skills. The workbooks A-D work on these things. The writing load increases with each subsequent grade. If your child has difficulty with writing, the slow increase throughout the books will help prepare him for a strong start in first grade.

                Starting at the beginning will also help you. You'll learn the MP system. You'll quickly see how all the little pieces in the curriculum come together to create the whole of a beautiful education. You'll also ask questions at the beginning of your teaching journey, when the stakes aren't as high, and that will prevent regression or the need to repeat later on. Dictation, for example, stumps lots of new users. If you get over that hump in book A or B, you'll be coasting along in D, when you child is starting in on some new topics and skills.

                Starting at the beginning and moving at your child's pace will help to fill knowledge gaps and also build confidence. Reading hasn't come easy. He sees his siblings enjoying it, but not him. That struggle may have been internalized and it's hard to pull a kid out of a defeated view.

                Don't think of it as starting over, just think of it as summer review. I can say I went through this same process with my middle child. We worked at her pace and she completed all of the workbooks in a semester. Her confidence soared and today she is an eager and advanced reader.

                And if you're feeling a little defeated yourself, "He's already completed first grade!" You need to choose an upper grade, say middle school, and look at the course books. Did you study those things in 7th grade? I know I studied some of those things in high school. So, he's not repeating. He's not falling behind. A 7 turning 8 year old is usually pretty well placed in first grade. By homeschooling we are free to move at our child's pace, whether slow-normal-or advanced. Comparing our children to other siblings or friends will get us nowhere expect being defeated before we even start.
                Married to DH for 14 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

                DS11- Simply Classical 5/6
                DD9- Simply Classical 5/6 (neurotypical, but schooling with big brother to save mom's sanity)
                DD 6- Classic Core First Grade

                We've completed:
                Classic Core Jr. kindergarten, kindergarten, first grade, and second grade.
                Simply Classical levels B, C, 1, 2, 3, and 4.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Colomama View Post
                  I agree with Michelle, start at the beginning. The work books are cheap enough.

                  One of the major strengths of MP is it's multi-modal teaching. It's not just a matter of reading the words. The workbooks encourage children to write the words. This is where other programs lose some effectiveness, in my opinion, in an effort to make learning 'fun'. The skill of writing; pencil grip, attention to detail, hand strength, and memory all work together to cement the reading skills. The workbooks A-D work on these things. The writing load increases with each subsequent grade. If your child has difficulty with writing, the slow increase throughout the books will help prepare him for a strong start in first grade.

                  Starting at the beginning will also help you. You'll learn the MP system. You'll quickly see how all the little pieces in the curriculum come together to create the whole of a beautiful education. You'll also ask questions at the beginning of your teaching journey, when the stakes aren't as high, and that will prevent regression or the need to repeat later on. Dictation, for example, stumps lots of new users. If you get over that hump in book A or B, you'll be coasting along in D, when you child is starting in on some new topics and skills.

                  Starting at the beginning and moving at your child's pace will help to fill knowledge gaps and also build confidence. Reading hasn't come easy. He sees his siblings enjoying it, but not him. That struggle may have been internalized and it's hard to pull a kid out of a defeated view.

                  Don't think of it as starting over, just think of it as summer review. I can say I went through this same process with my middle child. We worked at her pace and she completed all of the workbooks in a semester. Her confidence soared and today she is an eager and advanced reader.

                  And if you're feeling a little defeated yourself, "He's already completed first grade!" You need to choose an upper grade, say middle school, and look at the course books. Did you study those things in 7th grade? I know I studied some of those things in high school. So, he's not repeating. He's not falling behind. A 7 turning 8 year old is usually pretty well placed in first grade. By homeschooling we are free to move at our child's pace, whether slow-normal-or advanced. Comparing our children to other siblings or friends will get us nowhere expect being defeated before we even start.
                  From another mama with children at different levels compared to their ages/siblings: AMEN!
                  Jennifer
                  Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

                  DS16
                  MP: Lit 10, VideoText Algebra
                  MPOA: High School Comp. II
                  HSC: Spanish I, Conceptual Physics, Modern European History, and electives

                  DS15
                  MP: Biology, Lit 10, VideoText Algebra, Greek Tragedies
                  MPOA: High School Comp. II, Fourth Form Latin
                  HSC: Modern European History

                  DS12
                  7M with:
                  Second Form Latin, EGR III, and HSC for US History

                  DS11
                  SC Level 4

                  DD9
                  3A, with First Form Latin (long story!)

                  DD7/8
                  Still in SC Level 2

                  DD 4/5
                  SC Level C

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Agreeing with Colomama and Jen. Mine are all at different levels than standard core age.
                    The Homeschool Grads:
                    J- 6/96
                    S- 11/98

                    Still Homeschooling:
                    G- 4/04
                    D- 5/05
                    F- 7/08 (my only girl)

                    Future Homeschooler:
                    M- 9/16

                    Comment

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