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OT: Moms with Teaching Roles outside the Home

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    OT: Moms with Teaching Roles outside the Home

    In the fall, I'll be starting an adjunct position with an online college. I'm teaching just one class so that my own children's education remains my priority, but it will still be a balancing act. How do you who teach in cottage schools, online schools, or other educational institutions protect the time you need to prepare your lessons/grade papers? How do you make MP materials work to your benefit?
    Heather

    DD 9, MP 4A
    DD 6, MP 2
    DS 4 & DS 4--going to Pre-K three mornings/week
    DS 1

    #2
    I haven't taught in a school since my children were born, but I had a few tricks I used to keep my sanity.

    1. Pick a cut-off time and stick to it. I would grade until 7 PM, and whatever wasn't done could wait until the next day.
    2. Delegate grading when you can. For practice, review, and most homework, I would have students swap papers and go over the answers as a class. Labs, quizzes, tests, projects, and key pieces of homework were graded by me.
    3. Plan 2 weeks ahead. I would spend Saturday planning lectures and activities for the week after next. On Monday afternoons, I would review my lesson plans for 1 week ahead and make all the copies I needed.
    4. Have a few emergency tubs for subs or unforeseen circumstances. Things like a movie and worksheet, review game, reading packet with questions, etc. If I made it to the end of the year without using the activity, I would use it as something to fill the days after the end of year tests.
    5. Find a veteran teacher at the school and ask them for advice, tips, and tricks.

    Hope that helps!

    Comment


      #3
      Heather,
      What a blessing that you can teach only one class! What will you be teaching? When will the class meet & how often? Will you be teaching from your home or other? I've been teaching two classes each year in our cottage school for three years in addition to director work. It's a lot. One thing I've realized is that it takes six days of work to have one Sabbath. I can't possibly work five and chill for two. Looking forward to hearing more!
      Festina lentē,
      Jessica P

      '22-'23 • 13th year HSing • 11th year MP
      DS Hillsdale College freshman
      DD 11th • HLN & Latin online
      DD 8th • HLN & Home
      DS 5th • HLN & Home
      Me • Memoria College, MPOA Fourth Form for Adults

      Teaching Third Form Latin and co-directing @
      Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School, est. 2016

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by pickandgrin View Post
        Heather,
        What a blessing that you can teach only one class! What will you be teaching? When will the class meet & how often? Will you be teaching from your home or other? I've been teaching two classes each year in our cottage school for three years in addition to director work. It's a lot. One thing I've realized is that it takes six days of work to have one Sabbath. I can't possibly work five and chill for two. Looking forward to hearing more!
        Jessica,

        I will be teaching Advanced Grammar to English education majors. The Lord dropped this blessing into my lap quite unexpectedly; staying home with my own kids but also resuming my career was not something I dreamed possible!

        I will film my lectures, 3 per week. I hope to get ahead in the summer before the class actually begins, and I'll likely do these before the kids wake up or on Saturdays when DH can keep them occupied.

        I'm particularly looking for ideas on how to carve out some time each day to devote to studying/grading, and for this time to not be late at night! How to train the kids that Mom's time is to be respected? How to approach my homeschooling responsibilities so as to leave myself some time each afternoon for study?

        My signature is out-of-date. In the fall my kids will be in grades 6, 4, 1 (twins who are on opposite ends of the spectrum in reading ability); I also have a very clingy 3 y. o. who probably needs to go to preschool to help cut the apron strings. ????

        Heather
        Heather

        DD 9, MP 4A
        DD 6, MP 2
        DS 4 & DS 4--going to Pre-K three mornings/week
        DS 1

        Comment


          #5
          I've been working for an online school for two years now. I have always structured my son's homeschool day where he begins his independent work for one hour before I meet with him. I use that hour wisely. I can often get a little work done in the morning (maybe 30 mins, rarely an hour), but that helps me to set up my day. My other large block of time is from 2:30-4:30pm or 3-5pm. While this isn't the only time I work, I try to keep that time open. And, like Jessica, I do end up spreading my responsibilities over more than just 5 days. Probably unlike Jessica, I do end up using Sunday for planning and organizing of my upcoming week so I can see what and were I need to adapt my flexible schedule. All flexibility sounds great, until you have two huge "very flexible" responsibilities. It becomes like a vast puzzle to meet both needs simultaneously.

          It probably helps that I am not one of those homeschoolers who is energized by spending time out of the house. In fact, I grudge it. We attend a one-day co-op which gets me home by 2pm (them I work). My son has one sport practice and one piano practice a week. If there were more activities than that, I'd have to ask my husband to help, or to trim. To homeschool well and work from home, that is all *I* can manage.



          Jen


          DS, 28 yrs, graduated from MIT (Aerospace)

          DS, 26 yrs, graduated from SIU's School of Business, ENGAGED!

          DD, 23 yrs, graduated from The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC; 2nd grade teacher.

          DS, 13 yrs, 9th grade; attends a private classical school, 7th - 12th.

          All homeschooled for some/all of their K-12 education.

          Me: retired after 16 years of continuous homeschooling, now a high school chemistry teacher at a large Catholic high school

          Comment


            #6
            I have always scheduled my grading/ planning time as if it were an out of the house obligation with DH home to make sure things stay on track. Sometimes I would even use a study room at our very-near-to-our-house library.

            Now I can work while dd works on school or early in the morning. I'm only teaching one outside co-op class right now, but when I taught a full load at CC I would line my classes up on two days and have dd stay with grandma and do light school with her. The older kids where all almost graduated and doing dual credit and/ or taking classes at the local high school. Now I work at a library mostly evenings, and when I work days dd can come along. Dh also has a job that dd can go in to and volunteer or find a find a quiet corner to study.
            Bean. Long time MP user. Almost retired homeschool mom and university faculty/ librarian.

            I apologize in advance for my typos and grammatical mishaps.

            DD (17) Graduated!
            Mechanical Engineering

            "School Administrator" to niece (9): MP 3A

            Comment


              #7
              I've always struggled with this because I have lots of children to teach at home, I work with my husband, and I taught multiple classes in our MP co-op. Here is what I found does not work:

              1. Multi-tasking - this simply means that I'm doing multiple things at once and not doing any of them well
              2. Hard/fast times - this meant that I always felt the 2pm "have to start work" deadline hanging above me while teaching my children; my primary vocation suffered from this
              3. Evenings - I'm shot in the evening and my work always showed it; multiple mistakes, longer to finish simple things, etc.

              This year, I've finally found some peace. Here's how:

              1. I set specific days for work. I work Monday, Wednesday and Friday afternoons. If it's not an emergency, it waits until my next work day.
              2. I set specific days for school-related prep. If I have materials to prep, that's Tuesday. If it's grading/setting planners/co-op prep, that's Friday.
              3. I removed the specific afternoon start time and switched to blocks. I have three blocks each afternoon. They don't have specific time-frames, they simply go in the same order and I know they need to be completed by the time I need to start dinner.
              4. I stopped working on Saturdays. All my school/co-op prep and grading has to be done on Fridays and I gave myself a one hour time limit for prepping my most difficult class. My husband greatly appreciates that I no longer spend 4 hours every Saturday working on school things.

              I have SO much more peace when working with the kids now and their education has greatly improved because of it. I work with them as long as needed and then pick up my next block; whether that starts at 1, 2, or 3 doesn't matter.

              Here's a pic of my planner as an example. My blocks also always prioritize family/school-related items before my work block. HTH!

              Click image for larger version

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              Jennifer
              Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

              2022
              DS18: Graduated and living his dream in the automotive trades
              DS17: MP, MPOA, headed to his favorite liberal arts college this fall
              DS15: MP, MPOA
              DS13: Mix of SC 5/6 & SC 7/8
              DD11: Mix of 5M and SC7/8
              DD10: SC3
              DD7: MPK

              Comment

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