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    OT: Older students’ opinions on their education

    Would any of you mind commenting on how your older students view their homeschool experience? I am curious about how more mature students (further along or even graduated!) look back on their own education. Feel free to comment even if they received education under different methods. We get to hear on here about how the parents feel—and just occasionally about the kids.
    2019-20
    DS--9, 3M/4M
    DD--7, mix of 1 and 2
    DD--5, MP K
    DS--3
    DS--1

    #2
    Ooh, what a good question! I have nothing to offer as my oldest is only ten, but I look forward to hearing responses from others!
    Pax et bonum,
    ~Charlene~

    We are a Catholic military family, and find homeschooling fits with our transient lifestyle so well! I am happy to have found Memoria Press after trying many different things.
    dd (10), dd (8), dd (6), dd (4), dd (2)

    Comment


      #3
      My 24 year old homeschooled 6-12 mostly with Kolbe Academy. This was well before MP packages. She loved her classical education, and loved to show off her nerd ness in her college art classes. She is now a graphic designer with aspirations to do children’s book illustrations and is itching to get back to classical education classes. She says she misses the intellectual stimulation of discussing great books.
      My senior was given the option to go to a local school and chose homeschooling. Sometimes I think he turns his nose up at me thinking I’m not a great teacher, but I taught him to self educate with direction. I think he wants the best of both worlds- master teachers at home on his schedule and freedom to hang with homeschool friends.
      My freshman begs me to keep homeschooling her because I understand her LD struggles and accommodate so she can actually learn and not just pass tests for a grade.
      Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
      DD, 27, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
      DS, 25, BS '18 mechanical engineering
      DS, 23, BS '20 Chemsitry, pursuing phd at Wash U
      (DDIL married #3 in 2020, MPOA grad, BA '20 philosophy, pusrsing phd at SLU)
      DS, 21, Physics and math major
      DD, 18, dyslexic, 12th grade dual enrolled
      DS, 14, future engineer/scientist/ world conquerer 9th MPOA diploma student
      DD, 8 , 2nd Future astronaut, robot building space artist

      Comment


        #4
        Ha, ha... This will be fun to follow.

        OK, realize that my two oldest boys are actually Millennials, mid-20's (birthdays are a month away), and as different as the sun is from the moon. My oldest definitely benefited from homeschooling the *most*. He is exceptionally gifted, but not "twice exceptional". When we began to homeschool in his 4th grade year, he was finally able to work at a grade and pace that allowed a little headroom (7th grade). You probably know that he remained in homeschool until he was biologically eligible to head to the DoD high school on base at age 14 yrs (we lived in Japan), where he promptly took up 11th and 12th grade classes. He never looked back and sailed into MIT with ease, but he will allow that homeschooling allowed him to thrive since I was always willing to let him lead. Within reason, of course.

        BTW, his current hobby is following Supreme Court decisions. While visiting this weekend, he discovered that the Court is in session today, so he dragged my 11 yo to the Supreme Court at 4:30 am to get a seat in the visitor's gallery, so they can have some brother-bonding. Exceptional people don't stop being exceptional, even if they are rounding the corner on 26 yrs, ha, ha.

        My next two kids would say that homeschooling was a mixed bag. They were best friends for *years* (boy and girl, 3 years apart), and have many memories to prove it: inside jokes, shared past-times, life experiences. As they aged up, both being relationship-driven people, they requested Away high school. OK, let me be more precise: they both showed that they lacked the true "internal motivation" necessary to study for the pursuit of education, and consequently I came to realize that for these two children, the EXternal motivation of Away school, and the tandem growth experiences with peers and other adults in authority was what each of these children needed to realize their fullest potential. Some of that had to do with our limited resources growing up on overseas military bases, of course. We did NOT have all these fancy high school homeschool co-ops which seem around every corner these days.

        Because of their high value placed on relationships, currently neither of these kids thinks that homeschooling was "best" for them. However, I disagree since they are going through The Selfish 20's where they have yet to gain perspective. It's not that they aren't grateful, it's that they yet lack the wisdom to see what the alternative would have been for them.

        There is no doubt that NONE of my older kids are mundane stereotypes of people their age. Each of them reflects the strong roots of their homeschool years with virtues and character than many of their peers lack (sadly I've met The Village). I do predict that Child #2 and Child #3 will eventually come full circle to see that their homeschool years were precious. In fact, I predict that about 60 seconds after they each hold their first-born child, all the pieces will fall into place and make sense.

        So you ask older students' opinions of their educations. I suspect those answers flow with the years. As for me, I wouldn't have traded any of if.



        Jen
        DS, 28 yrs, graduated from MIT (Aerospace)

        DS, 26 yrs, graduated from SIU's School of Business, ENGAGED!

        DD, 23 yrs, graduated from The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC; 2nd grade teacher.

        DS, 13 yrs, 9th grade; attends a private classical school, 7th - 12th.

        All homeschooled for some/all of their K-12 education.

        Me: retired after 16 years of continuous homeschooling, now a high school chemistry teacher at a large Catholic high school

        Comment


          #5
          Jen brings up some good points and I realize I did not mention my two who went to public school.
          My 22 yr old homeschooled 5th-7th then went to school to play football. He was one who needed the extreme physical outlet that football offered. He was a much happier, calmer person after hitting bags all morning at practice. He is not a self motivator unless it is something he decides to do. He is extremely bright but did not try at all while at home. He “learned” enough to get into all high honors classes when he went to school, but honestly that was natural talent and he made little progress while at home. He was very motivated at first by the outside pressures of school. He wanted his teachers to like him. He wanted to prove that he was more than he looked. He worked hard and made a lot of progress. Until he figures out just how little he could do and still get A’s and still trick his teachers into thinking he did something great. Even now, he cannot work from home even though his job would allow some of that. He won’t work. But at work, he is supper productive and well respected. It is who he is and he knows it and adjusts his life accordingly. He likes the idea of homeschool- just wasn’t for him.
          My 20 year old homeschooled 3rd-7th then went to school because my husband thought he should. He was thriving on classical education. At school he continued to do well. He is the perfect student that public schools want- he fits their mold- smart, self motivated, book learner who thrives on traditional education styles. So he rocked high school- Nationa Merit Finalist, 1600 SAT, awards galore at senior night. In all the school plays. But he is not gifted like Jen’s. He is just smart, a good test taker, and fits the mold. He would have done great at home too. He values his time at public because he made friends outside his comfort zone and outside our bubble and he learned much about the sorrow in the world from seeing his friends lives. He values that exposure as helping his empathy to others. He went on to a well respected Catholic liberal arts school and is dual majoring in chemistry and philosophy. He had considered seminary, but fell in love with his best friend and is happily engaged and planning to graduate, marry, and go to grad school in 2020.
          Which brings up his fiance. She is a graduate of MPOA. I saw her profile in Classical Teacher back when they were “just” best friends. She seems to love her classical education as she is majoring in philosophy and plans to get a PhD. We haven’t talked much about homeschool but what we have it seems she loves it. I just wonder though, if the Lord blesses them with children how they will raise and educate them. I think it is quite telling that my son became beat friends and is now engaged to a woman who was classically esucated at home with the same curriculum he used while he was at home. He obviously shares those values. They are the cutest couple and so mature for their age. Homeschooling had to play a part in their maturity and confidence and love of learning.
          Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
          DD, 27, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
          DS, 25, BS '18 mechanical engineering
          DS, 23, BS '20 Chemsitry, pursuing phd at Wash U
          (DDIL married #3 in 2020, MPOA grad, BA '20 philosophy, pusrsing phd at SLU)
          DS, 21, Physics and math major
          DD, 18, dyslexic, 12th grade dual enrolled
          DS, 14, future engineer/scientist/ world conquerer 9th MPOA diploma student
          DD, 8 , 2nd Future astronaut, robot building space artist

          Comment


            #6
            OK, so my oldest was here for a few days, and I was afforded the opportunity to ask him this question in person. What a treat! Spolier alert: once your kids have graduated from college, it's a rare treat to get them under your roof again, much less arrange a tete-a-tete to look back over the good old days and reminiscence about the good and the bad. with my husband deployed, it was pure Mom & Son time. Again, such a rare treat.

            Matthew's take on homeschooling is typically elegant and brutal at the same time. He susses out the nuance of a thing, then "calls it" in a way that is hard to dispute.

            His take on being home schooled: worth it, for himself more so than his next two siblings (basically what I said above, although I was gratified to hear him say it). If it wasn't for his "special needs", I never, ever would have considered homeschooling since I did believe in the power of "school" at the time, like so many others who were top-of-the-class public schooled students themselves. He acknowledges that he would never have had the chance to rise to his potential had I not provided that for him in the format of homeschool.

            How he does state the outcome of home versus Away school would be in the form of an argument (his specialty is Debate). He posits that the very decision to school at home comes at a "social cost". This is NOT to be defined as "socialization", but merely as the loss of the social contracts in place that Away school provides: instruction from non-parental adults, peer interaction which can sharpen competition, create human interaction in both positive and negative ways which mature the child. With the decision to homeschool, the parent is choosing to "accept the social cost" for their child. That is the rock-bottom "cost" that comes with every homeschooling decision for the child, and that cost can be considered neutral at the outset since the parent will attempt to offset that cost in other ways.

            Please don't think he is saying something "negative" here. There really is a "cost" in every decision we make, and as humans, we try to minimize pain and maximize outcomes.

            However, the actually OUTCOME for each child then has an opportunity cost, and that cost *will* vary from individual to individual based on personality, gifts, talents, etc. He fully acknowledges that his opportunity to work multiple grade levels above his age allowed him to then launch into Away high school with specialized instructors, which then allowed for opportunity to get into MIT, which then allowed him to attempt Aerospace, which he thrived in. How on earth could a "normal" family allow this unique person to achieve his gifts and talents? Homeschooling.

            He also acknowledges that my next two kids, being largely relationship driven, paid a higher cost by remaining in homeschool until it was so obvious that they weren't thriving anymore (8th, 9th). Although the transition to Away high school wasn't the miracle cure, the relationship driven kids now confess that they feel they remained in homeschool for too long: the benefits of individualized learning began to pale over their true needs for entering the social aspects of Humanity.

            Please don't think I am now suggesting that homeschooling through high school is impossible. Not even a little. In my long, long 16 years of homeschooling (and always homeschooling AT LEAST a student who was working at middle school or above), I can honestly say that there are some kids who thrive in the ultra-independent environment of homeschool high school. The student is usually using a form out outside instruction for at least some of the classes, but HIMSELF prefers to learn independently, with great internal motivation (key!). Those kids are out there. However, there are so many other types of individuals we are given to raise. In my case, my oldest had the competition factor and the need for specialized instruction from experts in their field. The next two kids thrive on personal interaction (one is working to be a counselor, the other an elementary school teacher). So, the optimal opportunity cost minimizing factor for those students was to leave the homeschool after elementary school to attend Away school. The homeschool "cost" had become too high.

            If you have hung with this argument to this point, you deserve an award. It is time to decant some of my earned wisdom here anyway. I am essentially filing my Retirement Paperwork from homeschooling even now.






            Jen


            DS, 28 yrs, graduated from MIT (Aerospace)

            DS, 26 yrs, graduated from SIU's School of Business, ENGAGED!

            DD, 23 yrs, graduated from The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC; 2nd grade teacher.

            DS, 13 yrs, 9th grade; attends a private classical school, 7th - 12th.

            All homeschooled for some/all of their K-12 education.

            Me: retired after 16 years of continuous homeschooling, now a high school chemistry teacher at a large Catholic high school

            Comment


              #7
              We are balancing our transition into high school with lots of extracurricular activities. Dd is out of the house almost every night. Community theater, swimming and extensive 4H leadership activities. We never intended to homeschool. We have a great church, but there is not much for youth, and have only recently warmed up to the idea of homeschooling. (Lots of teachers in the congregation.)

              We’re continuing into high school only because Dd can transition into an early college high school for 11th and 12th. I honestly don’t know how we would make it work where we are if it weren’t an option. The local public schools would be a poor fit at best, and she’s young for her age grade already, so I don’t want to graduate her early. Since we’ve seriously looked at the early college school, her attitude towards homeschooling is 100% different. Suddenly it’s an opportunity to get her to her goal rather than a least worst option.

              Our older kids were “homeschooled” under current district rules, but were considered ps students under the rules then. They wanted “out” of PS sooner than I was able to make it work. I see my youngest flourishing in a way her very similar older brother was not able. My boys especially still wish we could have done more homeschooling earlier for them.
              bean
              Senior Member
              Last edited by bean; 03-27-2019, 03:01 PM.
              Bean. Long time MP user. I usually post before my first cup of tea is finished. I apologize in advance for my typos and grammatical mishaps.

              2021-2022

              DD (16) Appling to college. Mostly DE with a little MP to finish up homeschooling.

              "School Administrator" to Bonus Kid (9): MP 3A

              Comment


                #8
                I have the perspective of being a homeschooling mom who is married to a homeschool grad, so I'll chime in with what I understand of my husband's perspective. My MIL homeschooled all of the oldest 3 through 8th grade (I think) and then gave them each the option to keep homeschooling or go to public school. My husband is the only one who chose to keep homeschooling. He was and is a very independent learner and worker. Now, his education was not at all what we want for our children--it was not at the least bit classical, nor rigorous, but it enabled him to develop an incredible drive and work ethic that has more than made up for anything lacking in his K-12 education. He had a paper route as a tween and worked 20-25 hours/week at Chick-Fil-A during his 10th-12th grade years, including working as an underpaid, overworked Team Leader for the last two years while taking dual enrollment courses. He was also super-boy at our church, volunteering for every activity, playing guitar for the youth group, etc. So there was absolutely no social cost for him. He then graduated high school and went to boot Camp at Parris Island before starting college and serving in the Marine Reserves in an artillery unit. So by the time he was in his late teens, when most young adults are still dawdling and dabbling in this and that and "growing up", he had already put in years of hard work. Fast forward nearly 2 decades, and he has more than made up for any deficiencies in his education by pursuing his career and professional skills and knowledge with dedication and an internal drive that is rare in this age. Part of this is just his character--but--that character was forged more fully during those teen years of hard work and self-motivation. He learned to work hard at such a young age that it is just part of who he is.

                So we often don't know how things will play out in the long run. If you sized up my husband 15 years ago, you probably wouldn't have been too impressed from an academic standpoint. However, now he is a skilled professional with his own business. I think about this often when I become obsessed with my children's education. It's not all going to be perfect--it shouldn't be! But, am I training them to be life long learners and diligent workers? Because in any area their education "failed" them in K-12, they will be equipped to overcome, adapt, and keep moving if I did. (Of course, there are spiritual issues that supersede all of this, but I don't want to take this discussion into a completely different topic.)
                Michaela
                Daughter: Age 11 MP 6A (MPOA for TFL, 6th grade math, and composition)
                Son: Age 6 1st Grade MP Traditional Spelling, Literature, Math, and Handwriting
                for 2019/2020 school year

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by ClassicalFamily View Post
                  So there was absolutely no social cost for him.

                  Hi Michaela,

                  I loved reading about your husband's journey. I am only now becoming aware of "homeschool results" which is so cool. When I decided to homeschool in the early 00's, there weren't too many "final results" out there (or not ones that I was aware of!).


                  I wanted to add to this conversation, because I see that I did not do a good job of clarifying my son's concept of "social cost". I see that you are describing how your homeschooled husband was able to get out of the house to be "socialized" and it sounds like he did a good job at that. That is not what I meant by "social cost", so let me clarify. Social Cost is the cost paid for the opportunity cost TO homeschool, which otherwise would not have been paid. That cost is: the opportunity to have "school memories" like sitting in a school classroom surrounded by same age students, having a new teacher for every grade, attending assemblies, riding a school bus, etc. A huge majority of people that your husband knows HAVE those cultural and "social" memories from age 5 to 18 yrs. Some are good memories, some are bad, but they still EXIST as "social memories". He can only imagine what other people his age experienced in grades K-12 when they attended Away school. It is a "cost" associated with his education, that his parents decided was worth it FOR HIM. And, it probably was. However, there was a cost for him to be homeschooled and not be educated in the "normal" way. I want to be clear that I am not saying that it is a negative, but it does exits: you can only have ONE basket of goods in an economic paradigm.

                  That is what my oldest means by "every homeschooled student pays a Social Cost" which is usually neutral, on balance, since the homeschool family will seek to substitute other life experiences for the Away school experiences. The idea of "social cost" has nothing to do with Socialization, but has everything to do with "cultural norms".

                  Probably a fine point, but worth clarifying. Normal everyday discussions with this kid are like being Read Aloud to from an Econ textbook. Not exaggerating even a little bit.



                  Jen

                  DS, 28 yrs, graduated from MIT (Aerospace)

                  DS, 26 yrs, graduated from SIU's School of Business, ENGAGED!

                  DD, 23 yrs, graduated from The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC; 2nd grade teacher.

                  DS, 13 yrs, 9th grade; attends a private classical school, 7th - 12th.

                  All homeschooled for some/all of their K-12 education.

                  Me: retired after 16 years of continuous homeschooling, now a high school chemistry teacher at a large Catholic high school

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I’m a homeschool grad, and my husband is as well. We had completely different experiences. Mine led me to see homeschooling as “a given” for when I had kids, his experience left him not so enthused. FWIW, we both used the same curriculum for at least part of our experience and both of us had experience in public and parochial schools on/off during our elementary years. But his family was isolated; mine wasn’t.

                    The thing that that changed my husband’s mind about homeschooling was when we couldn’t afford another year of Montessori school, our local public schools were some of the worst in the state, and we visited the local Catholic school: it was dark, depressing, and even one of the teachers was talking negatively about the math curriculum they had just switched to. After that, he said we would homeschool but not to look too far ahead. That was nearly ten years ago A couple of years ago, we seriously considered Catholic school again (a different one in our town that has become more faithful) and we even thought briefly about bussing to a better ps district. We both came to the same conclusion: homeschooling was the best thing for our kids and our family.

                    All that to say: everyone’s answer will depend on their personal experience, what they value most, etc. With God’s grace and guidance, we have to decide what is best for our children — whether they end up agreeing with us or not.
                    Jennifer
                    Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

                    2021-2022
                    DS18: Almost done!
                    DS17: MP, MPOA
                    DS15: MP, MPOA
                    DS12: Mix of SC 5/6 & SC 7/8
                    DD11: Mix of 5M and SC7/8
                    DD9: SC3
                    DD6: MPK

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I'm in my 18th year of homeschooling. Before we began, I thought about the "social cost" in exactly the way that Jen described it. Not only was there a social cost for my child, but there was one for me, as well. I would never be the room parent, the field trip parent, I wouldn't bring cupcakes to school or see my child perform in an all-school music performance. Yes, there are some substitutes for those things in the homeschool world, but they are not the same. I felt strongly that homeschooling was the right choice for him, and a few years later, learning disabilities sealed that decision for us.

                      That first child just graduated from college with honors. After spending 4 years in a public university with mostly public-schooled peers, he values his homeschool experience more than ever. He understands the freedom that he had to be his own person and what a gift it's been. From an academic standpoint, his homeschool education gave him many advantages, but there are so many other things that are just as important - conversations with people of various ages, backgrounds, etc that he wouldn't have been a part of had he been in school, the freedom to pursue huge projects that were important to him and shaped his future, lots and lots of travel opportunities, etc.

                      My second child is finishing her junior year of college and feels the same way. There have been many times when she has understood a reference to a Latin phrase, a musical piece, a mythical character, etc, etc. that others just haven't been exposed to. It's been eye-opening. She is very appreciative of her homeschooled childhood.

                      I'm still teaching my younger two, but I will say that having their older siblings to look up to helps them appreciate their lives earlier. Most days, when we finish our academic work, both of them will hug me and say "Thanks for teaching us." Oh, my goodness, it has truly been my honor.
                      Gina
                      Honored & Blessed to be teaching my children at home
                      (since 2001)

                      DS-sophomore in college
                      DD-soon-to-be college freshman!
                      DD-9
                      DS-8

                      Comment


                        #12
                        This has been such an interesting thread to read, and the “social cost” mentioned above is exactly what keeps me wondering what my kids will think once their homeschooling journey is over. We, too, have accepted that cost out of necessity (lack of better options) and out of the positive choice that we see homeschool as providing an education that has disappeared from modern school systems. But we have done this FOR them - and as Jen brings up, it’s not the best option for every kid even though it is still the option that is chosen. Sometimes there’s just nothing else to be done, and that’s a tough, tough call. We try very hard to keep the communication lines open, and we emphasize the character that is being built by not having everything just the way we want it. It is, after all, another form of preparation for real life, but acceptance of that reality is tough.

                        Our oldest has loved being homeschooled. It has fit her to a “T.” Our second - not so much. But he’s handling it, and he’s seeing the fact that time passes a lot more quickly than he thought it would a year ago. A new job, starting deiver’s Ed, and realizing college is only two short years away are all helping. But the hope is still there that someday he will feel grateful. We shall see!

                        AMDG,
                        Sarah
                        2020-2021
                        16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
                        DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
                        DS, 17
                        DD, 15
                        DD, 13
                        DD, 11
                        DD, 9
                        DD, 7
                        +DS+
                        DS, 2

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Jen (formerly) in Japan View Post


                          I wanted to add to this conversation, because I see that I did not do a good job of clarifying my son's concept of "social cost". I see that you are describing how your homeschooled husband was able to get out of the house to be "socialized" and it sounds like he did a good job at that. That is not what I meant by "social cost", so let me clarify. Social Cost is the cost paid for the opportunity cost TO homeschool, which otherwise would not have been paid. That cost is: the opportunity to have "school memories" like sitting in a school classroom surrounded by same age students, having a new teacher for every grade, attending assemblies, riding a school bus, etc. A huge majority of people that your husband knows HAVE those cultural and "social" memories from age 5 to 18 yrs. Some are good memories, some are bad, but they still EXIST as "social memories". He can only imagine what other people his age experienced in grades K-12 when they attended Away school. It is a "cost" associated with his education, that his parents decided was worth it FOR HIM. And, it probably was. However, there was a cost for him to be homeschooled and not be educated in the "normal" way. I want to be clear that I am not saying that it is a negative, but it does exits: you can only have ONE basket of goods in an economic paradigm.

                          That is what my oldest means by "every homeschooled student pays a Social Cost" which is usually neutral, on balance, since the homeschool family will seek to substitute other life experiences for the Away school experiences. The idea of "social cost" has nothing to do with Socialization, but has everything to do with "cultural norms".

                          Probably a fine point, but worth clarifying. Normal everyday discussions with this kid are like being Read Aloud to from an Econ textbook. Not exaggerating even a little bit.



                          Jen
                          I understand...and I oversimplified when I said zero social cost (there was a lot more "word math" going on in my head that I didn't take time to write down). I probably should have said that for my husband in particular, the character development and social benefits of being homeschooled (and all the things that extra time allowed him to do) far outweighed the social cost of not being part of a "normal" school. When I ask him about missing out on such stuff, he just shrugs and doesn't see the big deal about it all. His view back then of public high school was that it was a huge waste of time filled with drama. He is an optimistic, risk-taking, ambitious realist who just doesn't get bogged down in what could have been, so it just doesn't matter to him (and never has--which I can verify since I have known since before he graduated high school). He also is one of those people who is adept at socializing with anyone and everyone of all walks of life, is a net zero on the introvert/extrovert scale, and has that unique quality of being unaffected.

                          Ironically, if he had attended his local high school, his education would have been superior in so many ways, as it was one of the best schools in the region at the time, but I don't think he would be as successful TODAY if had attended that school because of how very beneficial homeschooling was for him in all other ways.

                          My daughter, on the other hand, looks back with fondness on her year at a classical school (3 years ago). She always comes to the conclusion that she would rather be homeschooled, but she misses being part of a school. She is opposite of her father in many ways, so I have no illusions that we will achieve the same outcome for her by replicating certain elements of his homeschool experience. Academically, homeschooling is a perfect fit, but I do sometimes regret that she can't have some of those school experiences. I am also feeling especially envious of Louisville right now, as I ran into a mom of former Highlands Latin students at our co-op registration this morning. She misses the school (and the city) dearly. Oh well. BUT...then I remember that one reason I am homeschooling my precious daughter is to give her a little more time to be a kid in an environment that is safe for her very sensitive spirit...because if there is a "mean girl" anywhere on the premises (and even the best of schools has them), she will find my daughter and terrorize her. So the social cost equation for my daughter is opposite that of my husband's experience in many ways.

                          Thanks for clarifying! My one sentence statement on that definitely didn't make sense.
                          ClassicalFamily
                          Senior Member
                          Last edited by ClassicalFamily; 03-28-2019, 01:31 PM.
                          Michaela
                          Daughter: Age 11 MP 6A (MPOA for TFL, 6th grade math, and composition)
                          Son: Age 6 1st Grade MP Traditional Spelling, Literature, Math, and Handwriting
                          for 2019/2020 school year

                          Comment

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