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    Catholics using MP

    I understand there is an MP Catholic Supplement that has been in the works, but is not yet available. I'm wondering if those of you who are Catholic can share how you do the MP core curriculum as Catholics. Do you swap out the Christian Studies for Catholic Catechism? Do you supplement saints books? How does that look in your house?

    Thank you in advance for any insights.

    #2
    Elizabeth Anne,

    Most of the users I know use the Christian Studies program because it teaches the portion of Classical Studies in which God interacts with man-- the history of The Hebrews. The Catholic Catechism would be added to their daily program. Whether or not they memorize the Scripture verses of the Christian Studies is another question that I am sure Sarah and others can speak to with authority.

    Blessings,

    Comment


      #3
      Thank you, Michelle. This is helpful!

      Comment


        #4
        My daughter is in 5th and we have done MP since K. We do the Christian studies and it works well for us. My daughter recognizes the old testament readings at mass from Christian studies and that has been really great. We discuss the scripture but I don't require memorization. I might if we had more time but it is something that has fallen off. I would add in whatever Catholic supplements you desire but not skip Christian Studies. That's my $.02

        Comment


          #5
          MP is very Catholic friendly. It certainly isn't a complete Catholic curricula, but I don't think it's so much about substituting materials as it is adding what it's missing.

          We add catechism using the Faith and Life series. We add saints and virtues using the free downloadable Virtues in Practice program. I also have a few saint compilations we read from as a family.
          ~ Carrie
          Catholic mom to four - ages 9, 7, 5, and 2
          6th year homeschooling, 1st year MP!
          Using 4th for New Users

          Comment


            #6
            Such good info! Thank you. This is what I was hoping to hear about Christian Studies--which sounded great to me, but I hadn't actually seen it firsthand. Thank you, one and all.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by ElizabethAnne View Post
              I understand there is an MP Catholic Supplement that has been in the works, but is not yet available. I'm wondering if those of you who are Catholic can share how you do the MP core curriculum as Catholics. Do you swap out the Christian Studies for Catholic Catechism? Do you supplement saints books? How does that look in your house?

              Thank you in advance for any insights.


              All the Catholic mommas stand up and wave .....

              We do Christian Studies IN ADDITION to Catholic Studies. (Catechism, religious ed, CCD, whatever you're used to calling it)

              Christian Studies is the Bible as history, and it's things we need to know. I was not doing a good job of fitting it in, and had considered dropping it, until my daughter came home from her religious ed class and told me she was embarrassed because she didn't know things about basic Bible history.

              Every Catholic family will look different about how they add things in.

              We send our children to religious education classes at our parish for a variety of reasons --- I like the teachers, my kids have friends that go there, the classes are small and traditional, I have kids in Sacrament years, etc. I don't rely on the religious education classes to provide EVERYTHING. We supplement with saints books, word puzzles and coloring pages, and even listening to Catholic podcasts. Some months we dive in deeper than others, depending on how much energy I have and how much we have going on.

              When the Catholic Studies is available, we will be adding it to our days. I've had a chance to sneak a peek at a beta version, and it will be a wonderful addition to our family.
              Plans for 2019-20
              DD #1 : 24, heading to Chase Law School NKU Fall 2019
              DD #2 : 13 8A: HLS Cottage School Louisville, MPOA
              DS #3 : 11 4A + Simply Classical 5/6; HLS Cottage School Louisville
              DS #4 : 11 4A + Simply Classical 5/6; HLS Cottage School Louisville
              DD #5: 7, MP 2 at home, HLS Cottage School Louisville
              DS #6: 5, MP K at home

              [url]www.thekennedyadventures.com/all-about-our-memoria-press-homeschool[/url]

              Comment


                #8
                Hi Elizabeth Anne (totally LOVE LOVE LOVE your name....but won't say why, exactly! ),

                We are also a Catholic family using MP, and I am actually the person preparing the Catholic supplement. So, because of that, we have a pretty clear plan of what we do...which is:

                -read from Faith and Life
                -study the Baltimore Catechism as it pertains to the Faith and Life lessons
                -review the Fatih and Life lesson by answering comprehension questions (either orally or written depending on age)
                -read from the Bible weekly, as it pertains to the Faith and Life lessons
                -read a weekly life of a saint

                This is what I have incorporated into each level of the Catholic supplement, and my kids have been testing it out. So far so good - they really seem to like it!

                So that is what we do for our area of school we call "religion." We do still use the Christian Studies program because it is a valuable and important part of catechesis. Throughout history, Catholic school programs had three veins...Bible study, Catechism, and Liturgical life. Christian Studies covers the first, the Catholic Supplement will cover the second, and then the family can cover the third area by attending Mass, and by including other liturgical practices as they desire. A favorite resource of mine to help with the Liturgical living side of things is the Catholic All Year Compendium by Kendra Tierney. It's brand new, but she has been developing the material for the last 10 years (?? I think) in her own life and sharing it on her blog. It's great and adds a lot of fun I don't normally do on my own!

                That's what we do for school...not sure if you wanted like "Catholic family life" info too...so I will spare you that unless you wanted that too!
                AMDG,
                Sarah
                2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
                DD, 18, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
                DS, 16
                DD, 14
                DD, 12
                DD, 10
                DD, 7.5
                DD, 5.5
                +DS+
                DS, 18 months

                Comment


                  #9
                  A grateful wave back at all you Catholic mamas!

                  Dianna, your awesome Kennedy Adventures website (which I've followed for years) has been influential to me as I've been considering a shift over to all-MP for my last couple kids in the K-8 nest. We have used Memoria Press materials, mostly Latin, for what feels like eons. But we have never done the whole MP core. Your site (which I think I came upon years ago because of your Catholic liturgical year resources) has made me think long and hard about the beauty of letting a trusted curriculum provider do the lesson planning. So, for the first time in 18 years of homeschooling, I may actually hand the reigns over a bit to MP and stop trying to come up with my own plan for each kid at each level in each subject. The thing is, I used to do pretty well with that eclectic style (TWTM-informed mix of Kolbe / MODG / Seton) in the early years--when I was younger and more energetic and less pulled in a million directions. But now, even when I map it out clearly in the summer, I often feel so fried by February/March (yep, here I am) that I'm really not managing the curriculum well in all its varied forms with all the kids, and If I need to hand things over to my husband for a day, that's so hard with my eclectic plans. I just need a plan that I trust, and I need to go for it. After looking at classical curriculum providers, a big consideration was making sure whatever curriculum we chose was or could be infused with our faith and supportive of it. I wanted to be sure I could provide this, while doing MP. Your website initially caused me to think that was possible with MP, and now this conversation is helping me to understand how.

                  I'm so grateful to all you wonderful ladies for the great tips! Meanwhile, I, too, will be eagerly awaiting that Catholic supplement, although I'm not sure whether the release timing will keep up with their ages.

                  I'll put together a little footer with info on my kiddos, but for now, here's our family:

                  DD #1: 22, College Super Senior, University of Wisconsin, Economics Major
                  DD #2: 20, College Junior, Benedictine College, Music Performance Major
                  DS #3: 18, Learning Disability. Will continue some homeschooling another year or two while he works full-time. Simply Classical?
                  DS #4: 15, Eclectic classical curriculum, likely shifting to Queen of Heaven Academy next year
                  DD #5: 13, Eclectic classical curriculum, likely shifting to Queen of Heaven Academy next year
                  DD #6: 9, Eclectic classical curriculum, likely shifting to full MP Core next year (trying to determine appropriate level)
                  DD #7: 7, Eclectic classical curriculum, likely shifting to full MP Core next year (trying to determine appropriate level)

                  Thank you, everyone, for all your great advice!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Thank you so much, Sarah! I hadn't refreshed my page in a while and didn't see your post before I finished composing my last post. This is all very helpful info! I have taught religion to my kids for years, using a combo of Baltimore Catechism and Seton Religion materials, and some years Faith & Life. So I was really mostly wondering how the Christian Studies fit in and whether there was any reason that Catholics might swap it out for something else. Your answers have been very reassuring and I am excited to explore MP Christian Studies with my kids, and then add our Catholic studies. This is all so great!

                    I have seen Kendra's Catholic All Year Compendium, but we don't own it. I think I may be adding that to my amazon wish list!

                    You are all so helpful. Thank you! And, thank you, Sarah, for writing a Catholic Supplement for MP. How perfect it will be to have a complete curriculum guide for MP Catholics.

                    (P.S. Elizabeth Anne is a great name. Awesome patron saints!)

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Our first year with MP we avoided Christian Studies because of my fear that it would be anti-Catholic. As we got more into homeschooling, I investigated the Bible history courses for middle grades in Seton and TAN, and decided that MP Christian Studies was better. We study it more as a historical text. We have decided not to do the tests and memory work from Christian Studies, but we go back and review occasionally. For catechism, we use www.catechismclass.com. Sometimes we do it online. Sometimes we print it and read together. Then there is a quiz afterward. This program has lessons directly corresponding to the original Baltimore Catechism (not the slightly modernized St. Joseph version.) We do memory work from the Baltimore Catechism. We attend Mass several days per week, and are fortunate that our pastor has great, short, but educational homilies even during the week. I also recently ordered a copy of Dom. Gueranger's "The Liturgical Year," which we plan to read/browse daily. A lot of other Catholic homeschoolers love Faith and Life. We don't so much. catechismclass.com gives the info in a concise, interesting manner. Otherwise, we just live our faith and talk about it. Nothing complicated.

                      All of that being said, the MP curriculum is so Catholic-friendly, that we find ourselves studying our faith when we study Famous Men of Rome, Famous Men of the Middle Ages and Latin. Just take what is in the text and figure out what was going on in the Church at the same time. For example, when studying Attila the Hun, don't forget Ste. Genevieve...

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Another Catholic here!!! We use Christian Studies 1-4 and some of the other Christian studies books in later years, but we don't use the MP books in K-2. Nothing wrong with them, I just don't have the energy to do all that in those grades. I focus on First Communion prep in K-2 (in addition to reading, writing and math of course). Once we hit 3rd, we focus hard on academics in all subjects. We do the MP Christian Studies starting then. We also do Baltimore Catechism, read saint books and do Catechesis of the Good Shepherd (a Montessori style) in our co-op. I try to focus on adding in more about the saints in middle school and start Confirmation prep. I also try to add in some light Church history in middle school. All other subjects with MP for K-8 fit in perfectly with a Catholic education. The material has a very Catholic friendly worldview. The only other adaptation I sometimes make is to add in some of the Catholic Textbook Project books for some post Roman Republic time period studies that include both Church history and secular history all told together. We tend to do those as "survey" courses where we read and discuss but don't do written work. I do make significant changes to MP packages in high school. I love their classical studies, literature, Latin and math in high school. I use the Novare recommended books for science instead of following the MP science. I choose to do a more Catholic focused history (using either Kolbe, CTP books or in one case using the MP American history books and guides but adding in our co-op teacher who discusses that book by adding a Catholic flavor to his lectures) and I use either Kolbe theology or Didache for the four years of high school theology. If I have time I add in some of the MP Christian studies in a light manner, but the religion focus in high school is Catholic theology based and not general Christian history based like MP.
                        Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
                        DD, 25, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
                        DS, 23, BS '18 mechanical engineering
                        DS, 21, chemistry major
                        DS, 18, Physics major
                        DD, 15, dyslexic, 10th grade customizednMP plus co-op
                        DS, 12, super squirmy, possible dysgraphia, MP 7A
                        DD, 6 , K- finally one who seems to like drawing and writing- first one since my oldest!

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Hi, I'm also Catholic and from Canada, which I think is a bit distinct, at least based on my understanding of the catechetical programs my U.S. friends seem to have access to. We just finished CSI (wrote final exam today!) and I am very pleased with the program. I feel that Bible literacy is crucial to Church literacy and from this first book, I see MP setting up the child for that deeper understanding of the relationship between God and His people, and thus the teachings that we hold to.

                          We have a great parish for preaching, both Sunday and daily Mass, so I can draw on that for ongoing discussions that tie in catechesis and scripture for my sons. And since it's just the three of us all day every day, much of our discussions revolve around a Catholic/Scriptural perspective for the various issues that come up for discussion. I would like to be more planned, but I haven't yet seemed to make the Baltimore Catechism (I have St. Joseph's editions) or Faith and Life work for us as a regular catechism class at home. Our church takes children out of the Mass for separate instruction and I don't believe that is right.

                          Something that I would like to ask your input on is the "fire and brimstone" nature of the Baltimore Catechism - that's how one of my sons described it. I struggle with how to present the mercy and love of God along with the very clear call to holiness. I find this in the Old Testament stories as well. It is difficult to express God's love and explain the violence of the Old Testament to youngsters. I have a feeling that placing CSI at grade 3 is very important. I think that OT stories are like fairy tales in that there are appropriate developmental times to introduce them. When children are in those young ages, they want and need the black and white, the clear punishments for crimes and evil deeds. But my boys were a bit older and I think they find it hard to reconcile the OT violence with the mercy and tenderness of Jesus. Anyway, those are just my thoughts on the CSI stories and the BC. I really appreciate what I'm reading in this thread and your insights into the BC question would be so helpful!

                          Monica

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Hi Monica! Couple of things that stood out for me from your post...

                            Originally posted by KikaMarie View Post
                            And since it's just the three of us all day every day, much of our discussions revolve around a Catholic/Scriptural perspective for the various issues that come up for discussion. I would like to be more planned, but I haven't yet seemed to make the Baltimore Catechism (I have St. Joseph's editions) or Faith and Life work for us as a regular catechism class at home.

                            This is a big reason that we wanted to add more to what Faith and Life had to offer. It is a very difficult text to use by itself - which is why we have used it for a base, and then added much to it to help guide parents or teachers toward a fuller, richer lesson (hopefully).

                            Something that I would like to ask your input on is the "fire and brimstone" nature of the Baltimore Catechism - that's how one of my sons described it. I struggle with how to present the mercy and love of God along with the very clear call to holiness. I find this in the Old Testament stories as well. It is difficult to express God's love and explain the violence of the Old Testament to youngsters. I have a feeling that placing CSI at grade 3 is very important. I think that OT stories are like fairy tales in that there are appropriate developmental times to introduce them. When children are in those young ages, they want and need the black and white, the clear punishments for crimes and evil deeds. But my boys were a bit older and I think they find it hard to reconcile the OT violence with the mercy and tenderness of Jesus. Anyway, those are just my thoughts on the CSI stories and the BC. I really appreciate what I'm reading in this thread and your insights into the BC question would be so helpful!

                            Monica
                            Your thoughts on these are right in line with the tradition of how we understand the difference between the OT and the NT...that we have to keep in mind, when God first began His Revelation to His people, He had to do so by degrees...that is, He had to work with His people gradually, like small children who have quite a lot to learn. As they were first being taught, things were very black and white, with severe consequences, to try to help them learn to simply obey. Think about how we deal with our youngsters. The way I explain something to my three or five year old is vastly different from how I discuss things with my teens. This is what God had to do with His people, too. They had to grow into their relationship with Him. When Jesus came, He brought us a tougher expectation...not only were supposed to obey, but we were supposed to have the right interior attitude of love, too. He raised the bar, not by fear and punishment, but by a demand of love. So yes - it would be more appropriate for your teens to prefer the way Jesus dealt with us than the methods described in the OT!

                            As for the Baltimore Catechism, the thing to keep in mind is that when we want to know anything, we have to start with the basic facts and flesh it out from there. Think about how we learn Latin. We learn first by memorizing the structure...the grammar. We do a ton of memorizing so that we have a strong foundation. Then, we get to the "good stuff" of being able to see Latin in action through translation. We don't really appreciate the language until we are reading things that convey depths of meaning that are rich and beautiful. The same is true for our faith. There are so many, many layers of what to learn. Beautiful mysteries that are difficult for even adults to understand. To even begin, we have to start with the "grammar" - that is, with the basic body of information on which greater truths will eventually be understood. So yes, the BC itself is very cut and dried. But this is why we learn it first - it is clear, and provides a foundation. Then, as they continue through their lives, they will always continue to understand these truths and mysteries more and more.

                            To give you an example, not that long ago, my oldest child made a comment something to the effect of, "Yeah Mom, I don't know why you had us memorize all that Catechism. It's not like I remember any of it anymore." Once I picked my jaw off the floor, I asked her what purgatory was. Without missing a beat, she rattled off a not-quite precise-but-good-enough answer that closely resembled what she had memorized. I asked her if she now understood what purgatory was. She grinned sheepishly. She had gotten my point. The memorization served a purpose for a time, and enabled her to move on to a greater depth of understanding. Without the foundation though - who knows what she would be able to understand, you know?

                            AMDG,
                            Sarah
                            2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
                            DD, 18, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
                            DS, 16
                            DD, 14
                            DD, 12
                            DD, 10
                            DD, 7.5
                            DD, 5.5
                            +DS+
                            DS, 18 months

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Nikkirxd View Post
                              I also recently ordered a copy of Dom. Gueranger's "The Liturgical Year," which we plan to read/browse daily.
                              This is a fabulous resource that I use at our TLM. I never thought of using it with the kids! I do use a book called Little Pictorial Lives of the Saints, also based on the old calendar, which we love.
                              Amanda
                              Mama to three crazy boys - 6A, 5A, 1

                              "Non nisi te, Domine. Non nisi te" - St. Thomas Aquinas

                              Comment

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