Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Introducing Weekly Recitation

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Introducing Weekly Recitation

    Thank you to all of you who encouraged me to not give up on recitation. We have been doing it everyday again and I feel so much better about it. I do have one question. Some of the weekly recitations are hard for my children to remember or even grasp. Like remembering how many days in a year, nickels in a dollar, etc. Is there a special way I should be introducing them or teaching them that I have somehow missed? Sometimes they seem to line up with a new concept being taught in math, science, phonics, etc, yet other times I don't see any connection.
    Thank you for any suggestions!

    #2
    I do not know the official “right” way, but I just keep answering for them. “How many days in a week”? I give a few seconds to try and answer, if no response, I just say the answer and move to the next question. It is Feb, doing recitation mostly daily and my son keeps skipping March in reciting the months of the year! (Btw, those longer answers you can break up, for example on,y do the first 6 months, then work on the next 6).
    Christine

    (2018-2019)
    DD1 8/23/09 - SC4
    DS2 9/1/11 - SC2
    DD3 2/9/13 - MPK

    Previous Years
    DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3)
    DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK)
    DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others!)

    Comment


      #3
      Christine,

      There isn't an official "right" way, so your way is fine! And, Elah, when we introduce a concept that hasn't been introduced before in a class, we spend the time to "teach" it during recitation. This is just a simple introduction, but it does help the students to remember it. And as Christine said, just repeat it each day, and your student will get it eventually. This isn't a test and shouldn't be stressful for the student or teacher. Recitation time is the time to wake students' brains up and show them how much they know. It should be a positive time, so don't let unlearned material become an issue. I consider recitation time to be a time of encouragement and lifting up of the students' knowledge.

      Tanya

      Comment


        #4
        For short answers, I give them the answer the first time through, and then I ask the question again and have them say the answer. Usually, I have to do this for 3-4 days before they can recall on their own (depending on how good they are at memorizing, of course. I have one kid who can just remember stuff and another kid that...can't do that as easily).

        For longer answers (naming continents, planets, days of the week, months of the year) we use a whiteboard and the "eraser method". So I write them all out and we point and say each one, then I erase the first one and we say them all again. Then the second one, etc., etc. until they are all gone and they say the whole series from memory. It's tedious for me at times, but the kids enjoy it and get a kick out of erasing more and more. Even if my kiddo isn't reading well, they can usually cue in on the first letter, so sometimes I will leave up all the first letters on the whiteboard and recite them from there for awhile before erasing it.
        Jodi
        ~~~~~~~
        2018-19 School Year:
        Ethan (6A)
        Matthew (4A)
        Silas (K)
        Eleanor (3yo, chaos & charm)

        Comment


          #5
          Thank you so much ladies!

          Comment


            #6
            Our household loves chants or very simple movements. A little bit a rhythm seems to help them remember. For example, to remember the planets we start with our hands close together and as we say each name of the planet we spread our hands out further to show them getting further away from the sun.
            Heidi

            2018-19
            dd- 3m
            ds- SC 1
            dd- SC B

            Comment

            Working...
            X