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How do you pronounce Nunc Coepi?

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    How do you pronounce Nunc Coepi?

    just wondering if the C is soft or hard and how exactly is “oe” pronounced? Is that a diphthong pronounced like a long A? Is it noonk kapie?
    Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
    DD, 25, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
    DS, 23, BS '18 mechanical engineering
    DS, 21, chemistry major
    DS, 18, Physics major
    DD, 15, dyslexic, 10th grade customizednMP plus co-op
    DS, 12, super squirmy, possible dysgraphia, MP 7A
    DD, 6 , K- finally one who seems to like drawing and writing- first one since my oldest!

    #2
    The letters coe sound like CHEH in ecclesiastical pronunciation. Oe is a diphthong that is pronounced the same as ae. C before it sounds like ch. So noonk CHEHpi, with the final i like the i in machine. In classical pronunciation, coe sounds like KOY, so nunk KOYpi. Now I have begun.

    Bonnie

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      #3
      Wait- ae says eh? I thought it said ay? Uggg. I need to pull out my pronunciation sheets again! So ch-short e-p-long e: chepie and not ch-long a-p-lone e: chaypie

      an aside question- a friend said as a singer she was taught never to pronounce a long vowel. They are all short. This doesn’t seem right to me. Aren’t most eccliastical vowels long except in specific cases?
      Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
      DD, 25, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
      DS, 23, BS '18 mechanical engineering
      DS, 21, chemistry major
      DS, 18, Physics major
      DD, 15, dyslexic, 10th grade customizednMP plus co-op
      DS, 12, super squirmy, possible dysgraphia, MP 7A
      DD, 6 , K- finally one who seems to like drawing and writing- first one since my oldest!

      Comment


        #4
        You can pronounce oe like ay. The eh! sound is just a little crisper and is a good reminder not to let the diphthong sound drag out into two syllables. The eh! sound is found in pronunciation guides in Church materials published throughout the mid-1900s after Pope Pius XI standardized the ecclesiastical pronunciation to be used in worship.

        You are correct that vowels in the ecclesiastical system tend to be long. Possibly your friend was taught (correctly) that a vowel should be pronounced crisply and distinctly and never drawn out into two syllables, and she interpreted that as meaning that a vowel cannot be long. She might have been cautioned against pronouncing the vowels in certain words with an exaggerated long sound, like et or est. If you have a chance, ask her for an example to find out what she meant.

        Bonnie

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          #5
          Originally posted by momgineer View Post
          Wait- ae says eh? I thought it said ay?
          Originally posted by Bonnie View Post
          You can pronounce oe like ay. The eh! sound is just a little crisper and is a good reminder not to let the diphthong sound drag out into two syllables.
          I think you all might be using "ay" and "eh" to spell the same sound: long a as in late. English does tend to drag out its vowels though, so it should be a crisp long a as Bonnie noted.

          HTH!
          Michael
          Memoria Press

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            #6
            Thanks Michael! I read “eh” as a short e sound kind of like when you shrug your shoulders ‍♀️ And say, “eh.” So it is a long a sound but crisp. So a “creative speller” who hears it might write “noonk chaypie”? Just be sure the a sound is not drug out but chopped off quickly.
            Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
            DD, 25, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
            DS, 23, BS '18 mechanical engineering
            DS, 21, chemistry major
            DS, 18, Physics major
            DD, 15, dyslexic, 10th grade customizednMP plus co-op
            DS, 12, super squirmy, possible dysgraphia, MP 7A
            DD, 6 , K- finally one who seems to like drawing and writing- first one since my oldest!

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by momgineer View Post
              Thanks Michael! I read “eh” as a short e sound kind of like when you shrug your shoulders *♀️ And say, “eh.” So it is a long a sound but crisp. So a “creative speller” who hears it might write “noonk chaypie”? Just be sure the a sound is not drug out but chopped off quickly.
              Yes, I could see a "creative speller" writing it that way. By "ie" at the end does this speller mean a long e sound as in chief (again, crisply cut off)?
              Michael
              Memoria Press

              Comment


                #8
                Ha, I was thinking more of a Canadian eh?! Part of the problem in studying Latin pronunciation is that we Americans generally are not familiar with all the vowel sounds that most Europeans are used to hearing. If you have studied some French or German, you have contended with these nuances. Scholars may write that Latin long e sounds like the e in the French word été, but that will not be useful to many Americans. So the grammar books had to come up with common English words that approximate the sounds of the Latin; hence they is one suggestion for long e, ae, or oe. Fortunately the consonants are much simpler.

                On another note, I never thought much about Nunc coepi until I heard quarterback Philip Rivers speaking about how he applied it in his life and how his entire team tried to apply it, regarding each new play as a brand new opportunity. Talk about fresh life being breathed into an old Latin phrase.

                Bonnie

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