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    #16
    Re: Helpful Hacks

    Another hack I thought of, one I've used "always", is to set your kids to doing an hour's worth of independent work at the table as their first hour of the school day while your are getting ready yourself. My son has always had 3-4 tasks of practice/copy style work which have changed over the years as he's aged up, but still fall into the "practice category" (spelling, for instance). He starts his day an hour before me, while I am still organizing the day, doing kitchen tasks, etc. When we sit down to begin our school day, he has already knocked out several subjects. Our table time is very fruitful because of this: we are actually going over what he has just finished and grading subjects rather than simply assigning them.




    Jen
    DS, 25 yrs, graduated from MIT (Aerospace), following in the family tradition of working for the US Navy

    DS, 23 yrs, graduated from SIU's School of Business, working on Adulting

    DD, 20 yrs, Junior in Education at The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC

    DS, 11 yrs, 6M plus Bookshark's Later American history pack

    All homeschooled.

    Comment


      #17
      Re: Helpful Hacks

      Here’s one of the original posts I did about the “lesson day” approach makinmemories referenced:

      “...a trick I've found for older kids is to set aside a "lesson day" for them. You could also have a separate "lesson day" for each child if they're working in their own cores. Here's an example I posted earlier this year:

      Latin
      Monday: lesson and a few workbook samples
      T-F: flashcards, vocabulary lists, workbook exercises -- all done independently (with oversight) unless a child is struggling with something in particular

      Math
      Daily lesson

      Classical Studies
      Monday: drill, read current lesson, discuss, write answers to selected questions (OR answers can be assigned independently for later in the week)
      T-F: independent flashcard review, test prep, etc

      Science
      Monday: drill, read current lesson, discuss, write answers (OR answers can be assigned independently for later in the week)
      T-F: independent review of lesson facts, test prep, etc.

      Literature
      Monday: vocabulary and reading notes for the current week's chapters, discussion of previous week's chapters/questions
      T-F: independently complete assigned reading and comprehension questions

      Geography
      Completely independent; occasional drill to check on progress; write "practice map" and "country/capital list" reminders in lesson planner the week of a quiz/test

      Grammar
      Monday: review previous grammar questions (as listed in the current lesson), read/discuss new questions, do a few sample sentences to ensure understanding
      T-F: independently review grammar questions and complete exercises as assigned in the lesson plans

      Composition
      Monday - Week 1: do half the lesson
      T-F: no assignments
      Monday - Week 2: do remaining portion of the lesson
      T-F: independently refine rough draft and write final draft (be ready to answer questions, provide feedback, etc during this process)”

      HTH!
      Jennifer


      2018-2019
      DS-14 & DS-15 (MP9 Literature, Novare Intro to Physics, Light to the Nations I (CTP), MPOA for: Latin, Pre-Algebra, Ref/Con
      DS-12 (6M)
      DS-10 (SC3)
      DD-8 (MP2)
      DD-6 (SC2)
      DD-3 (NT using SCB for gradual intro to JrK)

      Comment


        #18
        Re: Helpful Hacks

        Originally posted by Jen (formerly) in Japan View Post
        I hadn't thought of this until you posted it, but a simple page protector and a fine point dry erase marker might also work. One color for "known", and the other color for "look ups". Sweet!



        Jen
        We just used a zip top bag. Also, make sure you use WET ERASE markers or you won’t be able to see your child’s work by the end of the day!
        Jennifer


        2018-2019
        DS-14 & DS-15 (MP9 Literature, Novare Intro to Physics, Light to the Nations I (CTP), MPOA for: Latin, Pre-Algebra, Ref/Con
        DS-12 (6M)
        DS-10 (SC3)
        DD-8 (MP2)
        DD-6 (SC2)
        DD-3 (NT using SCB for gradual intro to JrK)

        Comment


          #19
          Re: Helpful Hacks

          Originally posted by jen1134 View Post
          We just used a zip top bag. Also, make sure you use WET ERASE markers or you won’t be able to see your child’s work by the end of the day!
          Ack! Thank you for mentioning this!! That is a detail I would have completely overlooked!

          Originally posted by Jen (formerly) in Japan View Post
          Another hack I thought of, one I've used "always", is to set your kids to doing an hour's worth of independent work at the table as their first hour of the school day while your are getting ready yourself. My son has always had 3-4 tasks of practice/copy style work which have changed over the years as he's aged up, but still fall into the "practice category" (spelling, for instance). He starts his day an hour before me, while I am still organizing the day, doing kitchen tasks, etc. When we sit down to begin our school day, he has already knocked out several subjects. Our table time is very fruitful because of this: we are actually going over what he has just finished and grading subjects rather than simply assigning them.

          Jen
          This is such a good thing to mention and it does work really well for getting kids into the mindset of a school day while giving mom a little time to organize as well. We started this last year and both of mine are required to start the day with their grade level recitation (to prepare for the drills later), copying math facts (I have this pre-written on our white board so that they know what facts to start with for the day), and cursive and/or copywork practice (not the daily assignments). Last year we instituted the My Thankfulness Journals, and this is what they use to start the day. I love it because each day they have to write something new to be thankful for as they generally cannot write something that they had already written. <3

          Above all else, let us be grateful!

          Comment


            #20
            Re: Helpful Hacks

            I found another SF Latin hack that is gold.

            We are in lesson 10 right now (prepositions which take the ablative). I already know that this is a terrifying spot: when the student gets to TF Latin, does he *really* know them? Does he really know which prepositions take the ablative or the accusative?

            So, I added to the Latin side of the flash card "abl" for all of the Lesson 10 prepositions. Next week I will add "acc" to the Latin side of the card. When my son sees "a, ab - abl" on the Latin side he recites to me, "A, ab, ablative, in the presence of."

            Ablative or accusative has now become part of the memorization of the word and definition.



            Jen
            DS, 25 yrs, graduated from MIT (Aerospace), following in the family tradition of working for the US Navy

            DS, 23 yrs, graduated from SIU's School of Business, working on Adulting

            DD, 20 yrs, Junior in Education at The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC

            DS, 11 yrs, 6M plus Bookshark's Later American history pack

            All homeschooled.

            Comment


              #21
              Re: Helpful Hacks

              Originally posted by Jen (formerly) in Japan View Post
              Second Form Latin hack.


              Here's my recipe for each day:

              1. 25 Grammar questions from FFL or SFL. I skipped the pronunciation questions, but other than that, I simply move the marker by 25 questions each day in my TM.

              2. One set of cards from FFL. I have created divisions like 1st/2nd Declension Nouns; 3rd-5th Decl Nouns; 1st Conj Verbs; 2nd Conj Verbs; All FF Sayings.

              3. One set of cards from SFL. These sets have been building, and will "loop" more frequently than once a week until at least mid-year. However, my son is mastering his i-stem nouns nicely.

              4. Recite a "block" from the Recitation. I usually open to my TM, pages 98-102, and pick a page.

              5. Drill the current "unit vocabulary" from recent SFL quizzes which will end up on the next unit test.

              6. Finally, drill the NEW vocabulary. For new vocab, I always drill Latin to English for a few days, but then flip to English to Latin at least two days before the quiz.


              Ending on the "new stuff" allows my son to activate prior knowledge and feel successful. It he is having a hard time with the new stuff, he is already primed to see how it fits, then we move on.



              Update on the above hack.

              As we headed into Lesson 12, the review of the (FF) Present system verbs, I had determined that we can skip this lesson. Upon being handed the the Lesson 12 quiz, my son scored a 100% without even completing the WB pages. When we do our daily drills of the FF flash card packs, he can recite the verbs (English to Latin) as fast as he can do his multiplication flash cards (which is FAST).

              Normally I wouldn't "skip" a lesson, but this review material is obviously mastered, and it seemed like a better use of time to skip it. I used the Lesson 12 quiz to assess that, indeed, he has mastered the FF 1st and 2nd conjugation verbs. Besides, I slowed down to make sure Lessons 10 and 11 (Prepositions!) were well learned, so skipping put us nicely back on track.


              Moral of the story. It takes some diligence to remain faithful to the above routine, but it is paying me back in spades.




              Jen
              DS, 25 yrs, graduated from MIT (Aerospace), following in the family tradition of working for the US Navy

              DS, 23 yrs, graduated from SIU's School of Business, working on Adulting

              DD, 20 yrs, Junior in Education at The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC

              DS, 11 yrs, 6M plus Bookshark's Later American history pack

              All homeschooled.

              Comment


                #22
                Another update on the above technique.

                The holiday break (and my husband's deployment preparations) put a some friction into our total progress since December, but when we were able to do school, I stuck with my SF "hack": reviewing 25 grammar questions, one card pack from FF, one older card pack from SF, recite a page of grammar from the cumulative recitation, review the current lesson vocab and the current unit vocab. This does add 20+ mins to our daily Latin time, but it is paying me back handsomely.

                Not only does my 6th grader know every vocabulary word from FF cold, he is nearly there with every SF word we have so far covered. He is a master of SF prepositions, an accomplishment that was lacking when I did SF with my daughter in 2012.


                All that to say that yet again, I plan to skip the Lesson 18 FF review, the final review lesson of the SF book. There is simply no point in doing it right now and it will allow us to carry on.


                I am calling the above a "hack", but the more I continue to use it, it appears that I have discovered Latin Mastery.



                Happy February!




                Jen
                DS, 25 yrs, graduated from MIT (Aerospace), following in the family tradition of working for the US Navy

                DS, 23 yrs, graduated from SIU's School of Business, working on Adulting

                DD, 20 yrs, Junior in Education at The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC

                DS, 11 yrs, 6M plus Bookshark's Later American history pack

                All homeschooled.

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by Jen (formerly) in Japan View Post
                  Another update on the above technique.

                  The holiday break (and my husband's deployment preparations) put a some friction into our total progress since December, but when we were able to do school, I stuck with my SF "hack": reviewing 25 grammar questions, one card pack from FF, one older card pack from SF, recite a page of grammar from the cumulative recitation, review the current lesson vocab and the current unit vocab. This does add 20+ mins to our daily Latin time, but it is paying me back handsomely.

                  Not only does my 6th grader know every vocabulary word from FF cold, he is nearly there with every SF word we have so far covered. He is a master of SF prepositions, an accomplishment that was lacking when I did SF with my daughter in 2012.


                  All that to say that yet again, I plan to skip the Lesson 18 FF review, the final review lesson of the SF book. There is simply no point in doing it right now and it will allow us to carry on.


                  I am calling the above a "hack", but the more I continue to use it, it appears that I have discovered Latin Mastery.



                  Happy February!




                  Jen
                  Jen,

                  ive been wanting to start this with N...how would you arrange it with the new Latin Recitation set for the declensions/conjugations/forms? Would you just make that a third card set and have your FF and SF sets be Vocabulary only?

                  Everytime I try to set it up I get all turned around!
                  Jennifer


                  2018-2019
                  DS-14 & DS-15 (MP9 Literature, Novare Intro to Physics, Light to the Nations I (CTP), MPOA for: Latin, Pre-Algebra, Ref/Con
                  DS-12 (6M)
                  DS-10 (SC3)
                  DD-8 (MP2)
                  DD-6 (SC2)
                  DD-3 (NT using SCB for gradual intro to JrK)

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by jen1134 View Post

                    Jen,

                    ive been wanting to start this with N...how would you arrange it with the new Latin Recitation set for the declensions/conjugations/forms? Would you just make that a third card set and have your FF and SF sets be Vocabulary only?

                    Everytime I try to set it up I get all turned around!


                    Maybe I am lazy, but I use the SF recitation TM pages in the back (p. 98-101 I think) for reciting grammar forms. I have him recite "a page a day" to me which is very efficient since those pages include only grammar he has already seen. I suppose the new grammar flash cards cards could work for this, although I find I get a little overwhelmed at how many stacks of flash cards I am already juggling.

                    For the "25 grammar questions", I lightly penciled up my SF Teacher Keys book with all the FF and SF grammar questions in the back. The sets are roughly 25 questions at a time, some skipped or reworded. I simply move my marker from set to set each day.


                    I have my FF card sets into 5 vocabulary packs; currently I have 5 sets of SF vocabulary cards. Each and every day, I simply "do the next set" from each category. I only rearrange my sets if one set needs more reinforcement.


                    Does that help?




                    Jen C.
                    DS, 25 yrs, graduated from MIT (Aerospace), following in the family tradition of working for the US Navy

                    DS, 23 yrs, graduated from SIU's School of Business, working on Adulting

                    DD, 20 yrs, Junior in Education at The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC

                    DS, 11 yrs, 6M plus Bookshark's Later American history pack

                    All homeschooled.

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Michael and I have talked about eventually removing the grammar forms from the Forms vocabulary flashcards now that we have the Latin Recitation program. Then you won't have so many cards to manage!

                      Tanya

                      Comment


                        #26
                        This is really kind of simple, but it just occurred to me last week to post the introduction sheet for the Kindergarten Art Posters on the wall along with current and favorite art posters. It has tiny pictures of all of the works of the art, the title, date, Artist name, and style. The kids and I each have chosen 2-3 favorites, and I post 3-4 pictures that are concurrent with our enrichment studies, so with 9-12 posters on the wall, it is nice to have a quick reference already there for review, as some of the artists' names have spellings that just aren't sticking in my brain.
                        Michaela
                        Daughter: Age 10 MP 5A (MPOA for SFL) & WTM Grammar & Writing
                        Son: Age 5 MP Kindergarten full core and enrichment

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