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    OT- Any UK/Scotland members?

    I was curious. When I checked the Communities' pins, I saw 3 in the south of England and no where else in the UK! Does MP ship to the UK? I actually have a real reason for asking as dh has applied for a few jobs in Scotland. EEK!
    The Homeschool Grads:
    J- 6/96
    S- 11/98

    Still Homeschooling:
    G- 4/04
    D- 5/05
    F- 7/08 (my only girl)

    Future Homeschooler:
    M- 9/16

    #2
    Re: OT- Any UK/Scotland members?

    Originally posted by Enigma View Post
    Does MP ship to the UK?
    Yes, we do! Unfortunately, international shipping can be quite expensive. We do have a few international distributors, including one in the UK. They are listed on the Distributors page of our website.
    Michael
    Memoria Press

    Comment


      #3
      Re: OT- Any UK/Scotland members?

      Enigma, two words: Dougie MacLean, Scotland's foremost singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist. What a poet!

      I'm cheering for you all to get to Scotland somehow (with all your MP books, of course). What an adventure!
      Festina lentē,
      Jessica P

      SY2019-2020 · 8th MP Year
      @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
      S · 10th, MPOA Henle 3
      D · 8th
      D · 5th
      S · 2nd

      Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

      Comment


        #4
        Re: OT- Any UK/Scotland members?

        I will have to look him up. And thank you, Michael, for the UK distributor. May I ask for prayers he gets offered one of these jobs at a price we can afford to take? We very much want the kids to know Daddy's country and family.
        The Homeschool Grads:
        J- 6/96
        S- 11/98

        Still Homeschooling:
        G- 4/04
        D- 5/05
        F- 7/08 (my only girl)

        Future Homeschooler:
        M- 9/16

        Comment


          #5
          Re: OT- Any UK/Scotland members?

          Yes, ma'am! 🙏
          Festina lentē,
          Jessica P

          SY2019-2020 · 8th MP Year
          @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
          S · 10th, MPOA Henle 3
          D · 8th
          D · 5th
          S · 2nd

          Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

          Comment


            #6
            Re: OT- Any UK/Scotland members?

            Squeal! On it! 🤞🏼👏🏻💗🙏🏼

            AMDG,
            Sarah
            2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
            DD, 18, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
            DS, 16
            DD, 14
            DD, 12
            DD, 10
            DD, 7.5
            DD, 5.5
            +DS+
            DS, 18 months

            Comment


              #7
              Re: OT- Any UK/Scotland members?

              Thank you for the prayers. No word yet. We are on pins and needles waiting to hear anything. Until then, we keep going along everyday just as before.

              I checked the site Michael posted. It seems they carry the lit guides and few other things but not the entire cores. That is going to be problematic...
              The Homeschool Grads:
              J- 6/96
              S- 11/98

              Still Homeschooling:
              G- 4/04
              D- 5/05
              F- 7/08 (my only girl)

              Future Homeschooler:
              M- 9/16

              Comment


                #8
                Re: OT- Any UK/Scotland members?

                Enigma,
                Can you purchase the next year's cores in advance and take them with you? Will there be any travel back and forth that others could bring things as needed?
                Festina lentē,
                Jessica P

                SY2019-2020 · 8th MP Year
                @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
                S · 10th, MPOA Henle 3
                D · 8th
                D · 5th
                S · 2nd

                Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: OT- Any UK/Scotland members?

                  I'm not sure we could afford to do that or not. I haven't thought that far!

                  As for traveling, possibly my parents could IF they were coming already. This would be a permanent move so I would need to find a permanent solution. I will have to think about it more if dh is offered the job.

                  We are a little concerned about continuing homeschool (or home education) if we go as the US and UK systems are so very different for entrance to University. UK schools base everything on a series of exams taken at different set ages beginning at 11 yrs old. There are no transcripts. Taking those exams outside of a brick and mortor school is difficult to arrange, so I have heard.
                  As I have not done homeschooling for high school, I am not sure how to do that even here. (J dropped/moved out and S went straight to community college.) Will we need to use UK books? If so, which ones? How do I find them? Homeschooling, in general, is not a very common occurance in Scotland to begin with. I have learned most of them are "unstructured" ("Unschoolers"). Wanna guess how well we will fit in?

                  It may all be for naught, anyway. But keep praying, please! Thanks for reading.
                  Last edited by Enigma; 06-11-2019, 09:40 PM.
                  The Homeschool Grads:
                  J- 6/96
                  S- 11/98

                  Still Homeschooling:
                  G- 4/04
                  D- 5/05
                  F- 7/08 (my only girl)

                  Future Homeschooler:
                  M- 9/16

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: OT- Any UK/Scotland members?

                    Hello

                    This is my first forum post as have just lurked until now. We only started with Memoria last summer. Anyway, as I am in England I thought maybe I could help with a few of your questions.

                    The first question was about shipping. This has been my only problem with Memoria - I love their products but the cost of shipping to the UK by Memoria is too expensive for us. We have found that Christianbook.com stock all the Memoria products that we have needed so far and their shipping costs are far more affordable (perhaps they do higher volume international shipping and so get better rates). We have just started with Memoria Academy and that is going great so far.

                    In regards to education systems, Scotland is actually similar but different to England. The law in the UK is that parents are responsible for the child's education 'at school or otherwise'. There is a slight variation in wording in Scotland. I recommend new home educators in England and Scotland always look at the information from the local council and get advice from local groups in the area - especially before moving as some councils are really bad at overstepping their powers and others are fine and leave home educators to get on with things without interferrence.

                    In England we have GCSE's which in the school system take two years to complete (ages 14 - 16). GCSEs are completed on a per subject basis e.g. Maths GCSE, History GCSE, French GCSE etc.

                    Home Educators often tend to opt for International GCSEs (IGCSEs) instead. These are very similar to GCSEs but are 100% exam based and so are easier for home educators to access. I think Scotland has different qualifications to GCSEs however I suspect Scottish home educators still do IGCSEs because they are recognised in the UK as being equivalent (sometimes slightly harder) than GCSEs and are also recognised internationally.

                    After GCSEs have been completed at age 16, students go onto college (or a school sixth form) for two years where they will study for A-levels (if academic) or another form of qualification. These can vary considerably and include apprenticeships and a range of vocational qualifications. It is not normally a problem to access A-levels if the home educated student has achieved 5 good GCSEs including English language and maths.

                    You said:

                    "We are a little concerned about continuing homeschool (or home education) if we go as the US and UK systems are so very different for entrance to University. UK schools base everything on a series of exams taken at different set ages beginning at 11 yrs old. There are no transcripts. Taking those exams outside of a brick and mortor school is difficult to arrange, so I have heard."

                    There are no official exams between the age of 11 and the GCSEs at age 16. We don't have transcripts like you do in the US however you could say that the GCSEs (IGCSEs) in subject and grade are a kind of equivalent. So long as the student has at least five good GCSEs including maths and English language then they are mostly a gateway to A-levels. The A-levels (or vocational equivalent) are more important in regards to entering university and the workplace. Whilst the A-levels are subject-specific and some are more respected than others (e.g. an employer is more likely to be impressed with a good grade in maths A-level than sociology) they are mostly recognised as evidence of achieving a level of education. Access to university is much like it is in the US I think - the more respected the university / degree the more important it is to obtain top grades and jump through hoops in terms of extra-curricular activities.

                    You can enter for IGCSEs as a private candidate with the exam board and then locate an exam centre that accepts private candidates. It isn't always easy and can require travel but I think its quite rare for home educators to find it an impossible hurdle to cross.

                    "Will we need to use UK books? If so, which ones? How do I find them? Homeschooling, in general, is not a very common occurance in Scotland to begin with. I have learned most of them are "unstructured" ("Unschoolers"). Wanna guess how well we will fit in?"

                    Unstructured home educating families here are usually referred to as 'autonomous' and they certainly seem more common as we don't have the large Christian groups homeschooling here. That said, it has been my experience that many families do formal learning to some extent - how much exactly is very much down to the individual family and their reasons for homeschooling.

                    There is not much in the way of choice for home education curriculums here - I cannot name one. Most home ed families use workbooks (e.g. CGP or Collins) that are aimed primarily at school families looking for extra support. You will likely want to get books relevant to any GCSEs that your children take but they are readily available via Amazon. Personally I am finding that Memoria provides a curriculum that is far superior to what is offered by publishers in the UK that tailor their products to the national curriculum. Since I have made the shift from the piecemeal curriculum I was pulling together to Memoria's curriculum both me and my daughter have been happier - my only regret is not finding Memoria sooner.

                    I think most families try and keep up with the national curriculum and certainly during the primary school years (5 - 11) that is fairly easy to do without having to put much time into it and so the rest of the time is 'autonomous'. I am yet to meet another family here who are aware of classical education or could describe what it is. Latin is popular in the home ed community where I am - it just isn't considered within a classical context.

                    My point is that home education in England is quite random. Folks of all walks of life do it and have different ideas and approaches and the 'unschooling' crowd tend to seem more numerous than they really are (at least that has been my impression). I expect it is similar in Scotland and the kind of home edders you meet (and their number) will be somewhat based on where specifically you move to.

                    Hope some of the above is helpful to you. Sorry for such a long post but wanted to make sure I answered your questions.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: OT- Any UK/Scotland members?

                      GensMum, that was the clearest walk-through of the UK system I have ever seen! Although we are in the States, people sometimes ask me about home educating in the UK and I'm so glad to know more about it.

                      To the OP: Galore Park offers a lot of books aimed prepping for the UK tests GensMum mentioned. They used to have broader offerings which is why I am familiar with them, and now seem to be really focused on test prep.
                      Last edited by serendipitous journey; 10-28-2018, 09:20 PM.
                      Ana, mama to
                      ds A, 13yo
                      ds N, 8yo

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: OT- Any UK/Scotland members?

                        Originally posted by serendipitous journey View Post
                        GensMum, that was the clearest walk-through of the UK system I have ever seen! Although we are in the States, people sometimes ask me about home educating in the UK and I'm so glad to know more about it.

                        To the OP: Galore Park offers a lot of books aimed prepping for the UK tests GensMum mentioned. They used to have broader offerings which is why I am familiar with them, and now seem to be really focused on test prep.
                        Thank you. It took me a while to get to grips on the US system as well. We have used Galore Park materials during the primary years and I would certainly place them as being higher quality than most but unfortunately are still restricted to the national curriculum as they are aimed at (mostly private) schools.

                        I can see why you would think Galore Park is focussed on test prep. however the textbooks they offer are still available, just not so obvious on their website. If interested in looking at their range of textbooks you need to go to 'Explore Our Site' at the top and then choose the 'parents' section. The KS2 textbooks are their main product that is relevant to home educators. KS2 is relevant to children 7 - 11 yrs. The test prep. Galore Park focusses on (KS3 textbooks - ages 11 - 14) is for the 11+ and 13+ entrance exams which are applicable to kids who need to take entrance exams for private schools (and also some grammar schools I think). If a child is not going to a private or grammar school then the 11+ and 13+ test prep. would not be relevant and the average parent in England wouldn't know much about these. Some home ed parents may use the KS3 textbooks offered to cover KS3 national curriculum as they can be a good resource but I struggled to use them as a basis for a curriculum as they are one book that covers three years of information and is designed primarily for those around 13 yrs to review what they have previously learned elsewhere or to fill in gaps. Galore Park does not do textbooks beyond KS3 (14 yrs) so are of no help for GCSEs and A-levels.

                        Since there isn't much available specifically for home educators one of the things we struggle with is that the textbooks that are available via Amazon (available to the general public, not just to schools) often don't have answers in them. That means buying the teachers manual which is usually priced for schools (4 - 5 times as much as the textbook) which is generally unrealistic for parents. Galore Parks answer books still add to the cost but are more affordable than the other options. Other problems that we have with using textbooks aimed at schools is that it assumes a teacher will 'teach' the lesson in addition to what is in the book and some of the exercises (e.g. group work / games etc) are based on the classroom environment and difficult to replicate at home.

                        In terms of 'broader offerings' they used to sell some books by H. E. Marshall such as 'Our Island Story' which are also very popular in the home ed. community but they do appear to have stopped this range... fortunately they are still available via Amazon.

                        I should probably have mentioned in my previous post that our education system is broken up into 'key stages' that children progress through as follows;

                        Key Stage 1: ages 5 - 7
                        Key Stage 2: ages 7 - 11
                        Key Stage 3: ages 11 - 14
                        Key Stage 4: ages 14 - 16 (generally referenced as GCSEs)
                        Key Stage 5: ages 16 - 18 (generally referenced as A-levels)

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: OT- Any UK/Scotland members?

                          Just ... wow. A lot of great information there. I'm especially glad you wrote out the Key Stages model & pointed out that the test prep at Galore Park is just what homeschooler's do not need -- and that their older books can still be found.

                          I have liked the MEP math curriculum also, which is free and contains answer information (you have to request the PDF password for levels 7+, but they will just send it to you), but it does have just the challenges you mentioned in curricula for schools: lessons that expect daily teaching time, and also a generous dollop of group activities. As well as being a bit hard to navigate at first. I'm only tossing it out here b/c the math is so wonderful; I'm using it for my younger one's main math right now, it was not a good fit for my older.
                          Ana, mama to
                          ds A, 13yo
                          ds N, 8yo

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: OT- Any UK/Scotland members?

                            I'm sorry that our shipping costs are so high, and you are correct that CBD has a much higher international volume, so you can get our books cheaper through there.

                            Also, I did look at some Galore Park books early on as we were looking for curriculum choices, and they have some nice academic texts, but we couldn't use them because the amount of bathroom humor and cartoony pictures just wouldn't work for us. I guess the best description would be that it is more "worldly" than we like to expose our students to. Does that make sense?

                            Tanya

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Re: OT- Any UK/Scotland members?

                              Originally posted by tanya View Post
                              I'm sorry that our shipping costs are so high, and you are correct that CBD has a much higher international volume, so you can get our books cheaper through there.

                              Also, I did look at some Galore Park books early on as we were looking for curriculum choices, and they have some nice academic texts, but we couldn't use them because the amount of bathroom humor and cartoony pictures just wouldn't work for us. I guess the best description would be that it is more "worldly" than we like to expose our students to. Does that make sense?

                              Tanya
                              Tanya, that's a great point. It's funny, I've pulled ideas/work from the "So You Really Want to Learn ..." books at Galore Park (now KS2, I believe) and we did their math for a summer, but they've never been an option I used for regular work. Your observations are making me think about this.

                              FWIW, the MEP math is really great and doesn't have cartoony/worldly content. Tanya, I've often thought it might be one good option for charter schools using Memoria Press materials since the content is terrific & age-appropriate, the lesson plans are laid out, and it is free. Plus: no homework! just fact drill/review as needed. The drawback is that the units are British: pounds for money, for example, and the British pound is a coin and not a bill so that takes getting used to and isn't a straightforward mapping of our currency. Unless you assume silver dollars, I guess.
                              Ana, mama to
                              ds A, 13yo
                              ds N, 8yo

                              Comment

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