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    recitation v. review box

    Last year was our first year homeschooling, and thus with MP. We had a 3rd grader and a 4th grader, now 4th and 5th this year. However, we are not at straight cores in either grade because we are doing classical studies, Latin, EGR together, and with lit they are both now in the advanced for their grade. Anyway, that puts us in a mish mash of grade levels in the range of "4th - 6th" this year depending on the subject and the kid. Last year we used the review box concept and it worked well. I put all of the flashcards for each subject in the review box (FMR, States and Capitals, LC) plus I also added recitation reminders on index cards in the box for other subjects (EGR1, catechism, Mammals). Now I'm wondering if we were missing something by not doing the laid-out recitation that MP provides. I purchased the digital recitation plans for 4th, 5th and 5th advanced, but it would be difficult to combine the content of each given that we are not "in-sync" with any specific grade. So, without reading every line of the recitation packets, is the recitation information the same as the flashcards and major facts to know of each of the previous subjects? If so, I can just disperse the flashcards we used last year throughout this year and we are good. However, at a glance, it seems that some of the questions are not the same as the flashcards. How have others made use of the recitation materials? I am liking the review box concept, but don't want to miss any of the recitation material. Thoughts?
    2020/2021 - 4th year homeschooling and with MP
    DS - 7th
    DS - 6th

    #2
    Re: recitation v. review box

    Hi Nikkirdx,

    In my opinion, you should stick with the way you did it last year and not worry about the grade level recitation. The grade level recitation pulls out a few major questions each week from the subjects scheduled in the Core manual, about 1 week behind the new content. If you have even one subject different, you will be skipping those questions anyway as you go through the weekly list. Although the lists vary, most weeks seem to have around 10 questions (about 2-3 from the main content lessons).

    Here's what I suggest:

    1. Use the "100 Drill Questions" from the back of your subject TM. The guides have been written over the years, so the number may vary, but the questions in the back of the TM are the Course Take Aways. Honestly, I tend to use those more than the individual flash cards for some of my subjects. It just simplifies my life. If your students can crush the "100 Drill Questions" in the back of the TM, they've mastered that content.

    2. Use previous years' "100 Drill Questions" in some of the subjects (Christian Studies or Classical Studies in particular). The recitation questions occasionally pull from previous years' content. This year in the 5M manual, we saw Greek mythology figuring heavily in the weekly recitation.


    Hope that helps!



    Jen
    DS, 27 yrs, graduated from MIT (Aerospace)

    DS, 25 yrs, graduated from SIU's School of Business, ENGAGED!

    DD, 22 yrs, graduated from The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC; 2nd grade teacher.

    DS, 12 yrs, 8th grade; attends a private classical school, 7th - 12th.

    All homeschooled for some/all of their K-12 education.

    Me: retired after 16 years of continuous homeschooling. Ahhh....

    Comment


      #3
      Re: recitation v. review box

      Hello.

      I concur with Jen. The recitation serves a smaller purpose than the drill questions (it starts your day with a summary of what your students know which gets them started on a positive note and gets the brain juices flowing for the day). The drill questions are really what we want students to take away from each course. Jen prefers using the back of the book, but I liked to use the flashcards for my review (same information, just personal preference on where to get the questions). I was in a classroom setting, so the cards provided an opportunity to start each class with a review game or rapid recall.

      Tanya

      Comment


        #4
        Re: recitation v. review box

        [QUOTE]
        Originally posted by tanya View Post
        Hello.

        I concur with Jen.

        Yay! Tanya agrees with me! Score!


        The recitation serves a smaller purpose than the drill questions (it starts your day with a summary of what your students know which gets them started on a positive note and gets the brain juices flowing for the day).

        In Teacher Speak this is called "activating prior knowledge". It is a well known strategy which allows the student to feel successful from the start of a lesson.




        The drill questions are really what we want students to take away from each course. Jen prefers using the back of the book,

        I'm basically lazy now. I do what is easiest.


        but I liked to use the flashcards for my review (same information, just personal preference on where to get the questions). I was in a classroom setting, so the cards provided an opportunity to start each class with a review game or rapid recall.

        I think the biggest difference here (obviously, classroom versus homeschool is already understood) will be in how you want your student to "recall". When I call out the drill questions from the back of the TM, I am asking my student to recall from mental memory only, whereas the flash cards use a visual component (seeing the words). Each learner is different, but will often have a preferred strategy, so it is a good idea to alternate between the strategies so as to encourage the student to work on the weaker skill. Martin himself mentioned that at one point he realized he couldn't process much from audio input, having become a visual learner over the years. He had to train himself to listen to audio books to re-learn that skill. The use of the flash cards is excellent. The use of the oral drill is excellent. The use of both is superior.


        My humble opinion, of course.



        Jen
        DS, 27 yrs, graduated from MIT (Aerospace)

        DS, 25 yrs, graduated from SIU's School of Business, ENGAGED!

        DD, 22 yrs, graduated from The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC; 2nd grade teacher.

        DS, 12 yrs, 8th grade; attends a private classical school, 7th - 12th.

        All homeschooled for some/all of their K-12 education.

        Me: retired after 16 years of continuous homeschooling. Ahhh....

        Comment

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