Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

TFL Lesson 17

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    TFL Lesson 17

    We have a question about indefinite pronouns in lesson 17. In both examples on Worksheet 4, Drill E, pg. 128, numbers 8 & 10, the pronoun "that" is translated as "illud." How do you know to use "illud?" Are indefinite pronouns always translated using the neuter? We couldn't find an explanation addressing this specifically, but we may have missed it somewhere.

    Thanks for your help.
    Kristin
    Kristin - Administrator for Vita Beata (discussion classes for MP users)
    DD18; AFROTC and Aerospace Engineering Major
    DD16; Junior

    #2
    Re: TFL Lesson 17

    Originally posted by klwalukas View Post
    We have a question about indefinite pronouns in lesson 17. In both examples on Worksheet 4, Drill E, pg. 128, numbers 8 & 10, the pronoun "that" is translated as "illud." How do you know to use "illud?" Are indefinite pronouns always translated using the neuter? We couldn't find an explanation addressing this specifically, but we may have missed it somewhere.

    Thanks for your help.
    Kristin
    Yes, the pronoun is neuter because it refers to a general concept conveyed by the prior clause. This is an extension of the rules for "Adjectives Used as Nouns" taught in TFL, Lesson 9. The pronoun "that" is functioning as an adjective and means "that (thing)," just like the Lesson 9 example of "multa" means "many (things)." In Lesson 17, though, the "thing" is abstract ("indefinite") and singular. Does that make sense?
    Michael
    Memoria Press

    Comment


      #3
      Re: TFL Lesson 17

      Originally posted by Michael View Post
      Yes, the pronoun is neuter because it refers to a general concept conveyed by the prior clause. This is an extension of the rules for "Adjectives Used as Nouns" taught in TFL, Lesson 9. The pronoun "that" is functioning as an adjective and means "that (thing)," just like the Lesson 9 example of "multa" means "many (things)." In Lesson 17, though, the "thing" is abstract ("indefinite") and singular. Does that make sense?
      Thank you, Michael! That makes perfect sense.

      Kristin
      Kristin - Administrator for Vita Beata (discussion classes for MP users)
      DD18; AFROTC and Aerospace Engineering Major
      DD16; Junior

      Comment

      Working...
      X