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Second Form Latin - Lesson X

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    Second Form Latin - Lesson X

    Hi friends!

    We were working on Second Form Lesson X together this morning and we had a couple questions:

    1. Is the Ablative Case used for anything besides objects of prepositions?

    2. Then because the 3 of us like to rock the boat , we started playing with this sentence: I stand by the door of the house. The door belongs to the house. So the house is possessing the door (we think house is in the genitive) but the whole thing 'the door of the house' is the object of the propositional phrase 'by'. What case is door in? Ablative?

    You all are awesome!

    Thanks!
    Kristi
    Kristi
    DS 13 (8th grade)

    #2
    Hello,

    1. Ablative can be used for a lot of things! Lots of phrases that would be prepositional in English simply use the ablative with no preposition, such as the ablative of means (I found the land with a map.) or the ablative absolute (With land having been found, we set ashore.) Most uses of the ablative case involve certain prepositions, however; even these can have a variety of senses or meanings; common ones include the ablative of agent (The land was discovered by sailors.) and the ablative of time-when (The land was discovered on the fortieth day.)

    2. The house is definitely genitive. The door requires a little extra work in this case, because the idea we express with "stand by" would not translate neatly with the Latin equivalents of "stand" and "by" - we really want something morel like "stand" and "near". The preposition prope takes the accusative, so "near the door" would in fact be prope januam.

    Hope this helps!
    - Jon

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      #3
      Thank you Jon! That helps a lot! We will be doing lesson XI next week which introduces the 'accusative' prepositions. Your answer is a perfect segue!
      Kristi
      DS 13 (8th grade)

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