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  • tanya
    replied
    All those big Greek words - so confusing! Glad you figured it out!

    Tanya

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  • jillquillin@comcast.net
    replied
    I found the answer to my question.
    We are using Chreia & Maxim (Classical Composition III)
    In the Variations section of Lesson 2 (p. 26), a brief explanation of each “Figure of Speech” (onomatopoeia, periphrasis, hyperbole, and metalepsis) is included, but I always instruct the students to reference the Appendix for specific examples in literature.
    In our last class, we couldn’t find onomatopoeia, periphrasis, hyperbole, and metalepsis in our “Figures of Description (F.O.D)” section in the Appendix. Now I know why—because they are “Figures of Speech,” not F.O.Ds.

    The “Figures of Speech With Examples” section in the Appendix (starts on page 165) includes specific examples in literature.
    Thank you for responding Tanya

    Sincerely, Jill Quillin

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  • tanya
    replied
    Hi, Jill.

    Which Stage are you using?

    Tanya

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  • jillquillin@comcast.net
    started a topic Figures of Description

    Figures of Description

    The Figures of Description (with specific examples) are included in the Appendix.
    Several of the Figures of Descriptions are included in the lesson, but not listed in the Appendix.
    Is there a complete listing available?

    Sincerely, Jill
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