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Ab Urbe Conditā (Second Form, Lesson 10)

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    Ab Urbe Conditā (Second Form, Lesson 10)

    Can someone please give me a lesson on how this construction works? We will cover it next week and I want to understand it better myself.

    I think "ab" is taking "urbe" in the ablative case. I know "condita" comes from 3rd Conj. "condo, condere," to found. A wooden English translation would be helpful. What form is "conditā"?

    It looks like it should be "from the founding of the city" which feels like it should result in "urbis" instead. "Conditā" is my stumbling block. Is it also ablative? Thanks for help!
    Festina lentē,
    Jessica P

    SY2019-2020 · 8th MP Year
    @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
    S · 10th, MPOA Henle 3
    D · 8th
    D · 5th
    S · 2nd

    Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

    #2
    https://www.latin-is-simple.com/en/a...t=urbe+condita


    https://www.latin-is-simple.com/en/v...b/5/?h=condita


    Does this help? I'm nowhere near where you are though.

    I love this website: https://www.latin-is-simple.com/en/
    Melissa

    DS (MP3) - 9
    DS (MP2) - 7/8
    DS (K) - 6
    DD (Adorable distraction) 2 1/2

    Comment


      #3
      Ha, not really! I get lost on sites like that because they give me far too much. This is the title of a book (Livy) and those are usually a snatch of a phrase and not a sentence. I do think "conditā" is a participle, but I don't know much about them in Latin. Is it functioning like an adjective?

      Festina lentē,
      Jessica P

      SY2019-2020 · 8th MP Year
      @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
      S · 10th, MPOA Henle 3
      D · 8th
      D · 5th
      S · 2nd

      Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

      Comment


        #4
        Hey...can't blame a girl for tryin! Good luck Mama!
        Melissa

        DS (MP3) - 9
        DS (MP2) - 7/8
        DS (K) - 6
        DD (Adorable distraction) 2 1/2

        Comment


          #5
          You are correct. Condita is the perfect participle passive in the ablative singular feminine, used like an adjective to modify urbe. It is literally, From the city founded, From the founded city, or From the city (which was) founded. Latin makes great use of participles for conciseness and often uses a participle where we would use a clause. This of course refers to 753 BC, the traditionally given date of the founding of Rome; it is often abbreviated AUC.

          Bonnie

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by MBentley View Post
            Hey...can't blame a girl for tryin! Good luck Mama!
            Yes, I totally understand!

            Bonnie Thank you so much. I was getting stuck on "founding" as a present participle (that may not be the right term) rather than "founded." That helps so much and explains ab urbe, "from the city," which is what I'm teaching in particular next week. I look forward to my future understanding of such things, haha! I want to grow up to be like you, Bonnie.
            Festina lentē,
            Jessica P

            SY2019-2020 · 8th MP Year
            @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
            S · 10th, MPOA Henle 3
            D · 8th
            D · 5th
            S · 2nd

            Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Bonnie View Post
              You are correct. Condita is the perfect participle passive in the ablative singular feminine, used like an adjective to modify urbe.
              Bonnie
              Oh my. So far to go!! Thank you Jessica for alerting me to this thread. I taught this lesson today and had not been able to firmly grasp what "governing the ablative" even meant. Once again though diving in blind and beginning the exercises the revelation (or as much as I needed for today anyway) came to me right in front of my students . It really was a fun moment for all of us and light bulbs were going on all over the room. Latin is such a struggle and joy to me! I may be back on here as I face the governing of the accusative next week!!

              Dominus vobiscum,
              Amy
              -Amy

              Nine babies, 6 graduated, 5 married, 16 grand babies 6 and under!
              2019-20 MP 2nd, 5A, 10th MPOA, College student. Starting 7th year using Memoria Press
              Director of Coop 412, a Classical Christian Coop using MP and based on Ephesians 4:12.

              Comment


                #8
                On this same lesson, Second Form Lesson 10 I have another question. Worksheet 2 Drill A. Prepositions with 1st Declension nouns. Number 10 "from Spain" you have "a Hispania" as the answer. From the lesson I took it that that should be "ab Hispania". Please help!

                Dominus vobiscum,
                Amy
                -Amy

                Nine babies, 6 graduated, 5 married, 16 grand babies 6 and under!
                2019-20 MP 2nd, 5A, 10th MPOA, College student. Starting 7th year using Memoria Press
                Director of Coop 412, a Classical Christian Coop using MP and based on Ephesians 4:12.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Good afternoon Amy,

                  Roman usage of ab vs. a varied over the centuries, but during the classical period ab was used before vowels and H, and a and ab were used before the other consonants. Later, a spread to to the point that it was practically the only form used before any letter. We'd like SFL to follow the (simplified) classical usage of ab + vowel, a + consonant (except H), so we'll change the answer to #10 to ab Hispánia. Apologies for the confusion!
                  Michael
                  Memoria Press

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Michael View Post
                    Good afternoon Amy,

                    Roman usage of ab vs. a varied over the centuries, but during the classical period ab was used before vowels and H, and a and ab were used before the other consonants. Later, a spread to to the point that it was practically the only form used before any letter. We'd like SFL to follow the (simplified) classical usage of ab + vowel, a + consonant (except H), so we'll change the answer to #10 to ab Hispánia. Apologies for the confusion!
                    Thank you Michael!
                    -Amy

                    Nine babies, 6 graduated, 5 married, 16 grand babies 6 and under!
                    2019-20 MP 2nd, 5A, 10th MPOA, College student. Starting 7th year using Memoria Press
                    Director of Coop 412, a Classical Christian Coop using MP and based on Ephesians 4:12.

                    Comment

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