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Fourth Form Lesson 13, workbook exercise: Henle Reading No. 20

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    Fourth Form Lesson 13, workbook exercise: Henle Reading No. 20

    In this translation exercise, the sixth sentence reads "Omnia quae ad bellum pertinebant cognoverant." Why is pertinebant not in the subjunctive? It seems to be part of a subordinate clause as described in the lesson. Thank you!
    DS14, MPOA HS Comp II, mix of MP resources with substitutions, 2019-2020

    "[May] the peace of God, which passes all understanding, ... keep your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus."

    #2
    The subordinate clause, quae ad bellum pertinebant, is a simple relative adjective clause that takes the indicative rather than the subjunctive. I don't have Fourth Form in front of me, so I leave it to Michael to explain further, but this type of relative clause simply relates a fact about an antecedent in the main clause, here the direct object Omnia. Such a clause is adjectival, as it modifies its antecedent. It is not a relative purpose clause or any other type of subordinate clause that requires the subjunctive.

    You ask a great question, but know that this is more thoroughly covered in Henle Second Year, where there is plenty of practice in reading different types of relative clauses. It really becomes much clearer with practice.

    Does this help?

    Bonnie

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks for your response! It's tricky, but we'll keep going and hopefully understand better as we go along.
      DS14, MPOA HS Comp II, mix of MP resources with substitutions, 2019-2020

      "[May] the peace of God, which passes all understanding, ... keep your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus."

      Comment


        #4
        Maybe you are thinking of all relative clauses as being relative clauses of purpose. Think of the latter as a subgroup, a specific kind of relative clause that requires the subjunctive. But not all relative clauses express purpose. You might think of the example: Pater Noster, qui es in caelis.... Our Father, who art in heaven.... The verb es is in the indicative, as the clause simply states a fact about the antecedent Pater. It does not express purpose. Many relative clauses take the indicative.

        Bonnie

        Comment


          #5
          Good afternoon plb,

          I'm not sure there's anything I can add to Bonnie's excellent explanation, so I will merely point you back to Lesson 9 of Fourth Form which covers the two types of clauses, independent and subordinate. Notice that a clause's type is determined solely by whether or not the clause can stand alone as a complete thought. The mood of the verb (indicative vs. subjunctive) does not matter.

          HTH!
          Michael
          Memoria Press

          Comment


            #6
            That makes sense. Thanks again!
            DS14, MPOA HS Comp II, mix of MP resources with substitutions, 2019-2020

            "[May] the peace of God, which passes all understanding, ... keep your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus."

            Comment

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