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    another Latin Question

    I have a question about TFL Lesson 29. In the textbook lesson, it says that the comparative form of multi, -ae, -a is plures, plura. I am a little confused, because the comparative form for multus, -a, -um is plus, pluris, which is a noun. The two comparatives look a lot like singular and plural forms of the same word. I'm not sure, is plures, plura the plural form of plus, pluris or is it an adjective? Also, plura is confusing me. Is it a genitive, the neuter form of an adjective, or just a really weird neuter comparative? Thanks, Faustina (:
    DD 12, using 6M core with 7th Grade COTR
    DS 10, using 5M core

    #2
    Good afternoon Faustina,

    Excellent questions! Recall that in the SINGULAR, multus -a -um usually means much, as in much grain (multum frumentum) or much water (multa aqua). The comparative degree of this singular usage is a NOUN, plus pluris n., which takes an object in the genitive, as in plus frumenti (more grain) or plus aquae (more water). The case of plus will be determined by its use in a sentence. For example, plus is accusative in the sentence Plus frumenti habeo. (I have more grain.).

    In the PLURAL, multus -a -um usually means many, as in many crops (multa frumenta) or many friends (multi amici). The comparative degree of this plural usage is an ADJECTIVE, plures plura, which is declined like a regular comparative adjective (e.g., latiores latiora) and will agree with the noun it modifies in gender, number, and case: plura frumenta (more crops), plures amici (more friends), Plura frumenta habeo. (I have more crops.)

    I hope the above explanation is helpful. If it's not, or if you have further questions, please let me know!
    Michael
    Memoria Press

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      #3
      Thanks, that does help. So, plures is the m/f form and plura is the neuter?
      DD 12, using 6M core with 7th Grade COTR
      DS 10, using 5M core

      Comment


        #4
        Correct! The full declension would be:

        M/F
        plures
        plurum
        pluribus
        plures
        pluribus

        N
        plura
        plurum
        pluribus
        plura
        pluribus

        HTH!
        Michael
        Memoria Press

        Comment


          #5
          Thank you so much that clears the whole thing up completely!
          DD 12, using 6M core with 7th Grade COTR
          DS 10, using 5M core

          Comment


            #6
            By the way, I did the translation exercise about the "Murder in the Tiber", in Lessons 28 - 31. The ending didn't really make sense. Why does the policeman say "This is the price of war.", and then end the story? It doesn't exactly clear up the mystery. Also, why does the Spaniard shout "bring help!" if he purposefully went to a spot with no people? Where did the policemen come from?

            Faustina
            DD 12, using 6M core with 7th Grade COTR
            DS 10, using 5M core

            Comment


              #7
              I can't help at all here, but your questions make this look like a great book I would like to read.

              Tanya

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                #8
                Originally posted by Girlnumber20 View Post
                By the way, I did the translation exercise about the "Murder in the Tiber", in Lessons 28 - 31. The ending didn't really make sense. Why does the policeman say "This is the price of war.", and then end the story? It doesn't exactly clear up the mystery. Also, why does the Spaniard shout "bring help!" if he purposefully went to a spot with no people? Where did the policemen come from?

                Faustina
                Good afternoon Faustina,

                The policeman blames a war for two reasons. First, both victims are centurions and thus part of the Roman military (Part 3). Second, the murderer says that he killed the centurions on behalf of his country and brother (Part 4). The implication is that the murderer's brother was killed in a battle with the Romans and so the murderer is seeking revenge.

                The speaker did sit down in a "locum ... sine turba" (a place without a crowd). However, he was still in the middle of Rome, and while there may not have been a crowd on the shore, there would certainly have been people around. The speaker was hoping to rest, but when he saw the body he panicked and shouted for help, and so the policemen came.

                Do the above explanations help?
                Michael
                Memoria Press

                Comment


                  #9
                  Ah. Thank you. I was just wondering... (:
                  DD 12, using 6M core with 7th Grade COTR
                  DS 10, using 5M core

                  Comment

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