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I am really confused by Classical Composition Fable Lesson 1 Paraphrase 1

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    I am really confused by Classical Composition Fable Lesson 1 Paraphrase 1

    The directions say "Rewrite the fable with an example of each of these figures of description." In the answer in the teacher guide they do not rewrite the fable. Instead, they give examples of where in the fable the "figures of description" could be used. The directions do not say to point out where they can be used and give an example, so I don't understand why they left it at that.

    In exercise 2, the directions say "Rewrite the fable by inverting the sequence of events." They do actually rewrite the fable in the answer. So... one time when they say "Rewrite the fable.,," they don't mean to actually rewrite the fable, but the other time they say, "Rewrite the fable..." they actually mean to rewrite the fable? I don't understand what they actually want.

    I have looked through lessons 2, 3, 4, and 5 and they do the exact same thing. For exercise 1 they consistently say rewrite the fable, but don't. Then in exercise 2 they say to rewrite it and then they actually do.

    Why are the answers they give not consistent with the directions they give? What do they want?

    #2
    Hello.

    I apologize for the confusion. In the first paraphrase, we do want the students to rewrite the fable, but this will simply be a summary of the fable in the students' own words, so we didn't feel the need to rewrite it ourselves. But since the figures of description are the difficult part of that process, we did feel the need to give the teacher some ideas about how that could look. We actually write a sample for the second paraphrase because that is a more difficult task, so we felt the need to give the teacher an idea of how this would look. The first paraphrase will always simply be a rewrite from the students' outlines, including figures of description where they fit within the students' story. But the second paraphrase is more difficult and varies from lesson to lesson. In fact, some people skip the second one at first if it is too difficult for their students and ease into it.

    Let us know if you have any more questions as you learn how to use this course. We are always glad to help.

    Tanya

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