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    Third Form Latin question

    Hello, my daughter has a question about Latin that I cannot help he with. Lesson 16, Drill E, worksheet 4. Pg. 121 in the answer key.

    Number 7- she thinks it should be cupidorum instead of cupidus because cupidus is an adjective so she says she is confused about why it is not modifying equorum, even though she thinks it doesn't really modify equorum. She says it seems out of context and out of place without modifying something and doesn't know where it goes and why it doesn't match something else. I don't really know what she means, so I thought I would ask here.

    Number 8- She thought it should be idonis, not idonei for the smae reason that cupidus seems strange.

    Sadly, I don't know enough of Latin to be able to even understand her question, she is self-taught with a little help from a weekly class. Can someone help? Thank you,

    Maria
    DD 12, using 6M core with 7th Grade COTR
    DS 10, using 5M core

    #2
    Originally posted by Girlnumber20 View Post
    Hello, my daughter has a question about Latin that I cannot help he with. Lesson 16, Drill E, worksheet 4. Pg. 121 in the answer key.

    Number 7- she thinks it should be cupidorum instead of cupidus because cupidus is an adjective so she says she is confused about why it is not modifying equorum, even though she thinks it doesn't really modify equorum. She says it seems out of context and out of place without modifying something and doesn't know where it goes and why it doesn't match something else. I don't really know what she means, so I thought I would ask here.

    Number 8- She thought it should be idonis, not idonei for the smae reason that cupidus seems strange.

    Sadly, I don't know enough of Latin to be able to even understand her question, she is self-taught with a little help from a weekly class. Can someone help? Thank you,

    Maria
    Good afternoon Maria,

    Happy to help! Your daughter is correct that cúpidus does not modify equorum, and that idónei does not modify návibus. In fact, cúpidus and idónei do not modify anything because they are not part of a full sentence. Instead they are introducing a phrase, specifically the phrases "desirous of these horses" and "suitable for these ships." It doesn't actually matter what these adjectives would modify in a full sentence; the point of this drill is to simply give the correct Latin form of "this/these." Back in Lesson 12, your daughter learned that the adjective cúpidus -a-um can take an object in the genitive, an object like equorum (desirous of horses). Similarly, idóneus -a -um can take an object in the dative case, an object like návibus. In Drill E, she must then put the form of hic, haec, hoc that agrees with equorum (#7) and návibus (#8).

    Does the above explanation help her?
    Michael
    Memoria Press

    Comment


      #3
      Thank you, that does help. ​ For clarification, if that was a complete sentence those adjectives would match something?

      Also I have another similar question. On Worksheet 6 in the same lesson, (pg 123) I had another problem translating. In the second sentence in No. 1., his does not seem to match anything. Wouldn't it match its antecedent in gender, number and case? I know the pronoun agreement rule says its case is determined by its own clause, but dative/ablative case doesn't seem to make sense.

      Thanks! -Faustina
      DD 12, using 6M core with 7th Grade COTR
      DS 10, using 5M core

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Girlnumber20 View Post
        Thank you, that does help. ​ For clarification, if that was a complete sentence those adjectives would match something?

        Also I have another similar question. On Worksheet 6 in the same lesson, (pg 123) I had another problem translating. In the second sentence in No. 1., his does not seem to match anything. Wouldn't it match its antecedent in gender, number and case? I know the pronoun agreement rule says its case is determined by its own clause, but dative/ablative case doesn't seem to make sense.

        Thanks! -Faustina
        Good afternoon,

        Yes, in a complete sentence those adjectives would modify some other word unless the adjectives are functioning as nouns (Lesson 9).

        In #2 on worksheet 6, his does match its antecedent (canes) in gender (masculine) and number (plural). Its case, dative in this sentence, is correct, but the construction is one you haven't learned yet. In later reprints, we changed his to horum to bring the sentence down to the level of Third Form Latin. Horum is still masculine plural, and it is genitive because it shows who possesses the nómina. My apologies for the confusion!
        Michael
        Memoria Press

        Comment


          #5
          Thank you Michael. You rock.

          Maria
          DD 12, using 6M core with 7th Grade COTR
          DS 10, using 5M core

          Comment

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