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    Quick First Form Latin Question...

    Hello MP Friends!

    I had a quick Latin question. I think I know the answer to it, but I just want to make sure:

    Does word order matter when translating Latin sentences with adverbs?

    For example, would Aravi numquam be an OK translation for "I have never plowed"? Are there any times that word order IS important in Latin or any rules of thumbs I can use when grading translation work?

    Thanks so much in advance,
    Cathy
    Cathy aka The Attached Mama
    2018-2019
    DS 12, 6th Grade---MP 5M, IEW, Spelling Plus, AOPS Pre-Algebra, MathCounts, Kolbe Physical Science, Speech Team
    DD 10, 5th Grade---MP 4M, IEW, Latina Christiana (two-year pace), Spelling Plus, AOPS Pre-Algebra, MathCounts, Elemental Biology II, Speech Team
    DS 4 (almost 5)--MP Junior kindergarten, Myself and Others, "I See Sam" Readers, Singapore/Rightstart Math
    (Now we will watch as I start subtracting subjects off my signature. ha!)

    #2
    Originally posted by TheAttachedMama View Post
    Hello MP Friends!

    I had a quick Latin question. I think I know the answer to it, but I just want to make sure:

    Does word order matter when translating Latin sentences with adverbs?

    For example, would Aravi numquam be an OK translation for "I have never plowed"? Are there any times that word order IS important in Latin or any rules of thumbs I can use when grading translation work?

    Thanks so much in advance,
    Cathy
    Good morning Cathy,

    As you know, there is much flexibility with Latin word order. For "I have never plowed," both "Numquam aravi" and "Aravi numquam" are correct. In general, negative adverbs come before the word they modify, but again, this is a generalization not a rule. At the level of the Forms, I would not deduct points for word order unless a student is stubbornly choosing to always break the few generalizations that are taught in the series. As Cheryl notes, "The exercises stick with the usual word order most of the time, and so should the student." Where word order will begin to matter is not in English to Latin translations but rather in Latin literature. Latin poets took advantage of the language's flexible word order to invent many beautiful poetic devices that are difficult or impossible in a word-order dependent language like English. Even prose writers play with word order to, for example, emphasize one idea or keep a reader in suspense. Some of the most memorable Latin passages are so in part because of the imagery created by the very order of the words. Reading these passages is one of the treats of summitting the mountain of Latin grammar.

    HTH!
    Michael
    Memoria Press

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