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Lesson 10 - worksheet 4 (Fourth Form Latin)

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    Lesson 10 - worksheet 4 (Fourth Form Latin)

    My daughter and I were working through worksheet 4 for this week and we were confused by sentence 4. In particular we were confused by the translation ...the river was immediately sent into the forest...' The verb in this sentence is 'missa est' which I am assuming is in the passive indicative perfect system. The FF text would translate this as 'has been sent', whereas the Henle text translates this as 'was sent'. Is there a discrepancy between how this verb is translated between the two texts?

    My second question pertains to sentence 3 on the same sheet. The word 'peterent' is translated as 'to seek'. Why is peterent not written as petere?
    Catherine

    Dd - 12 - full core 7A
    Dd - 10 - full core 5A

    #2
    Re: Lesson 10 - worksheet 4

    Originally posted by Aquila View Post
    My daughter and I were working through worksheet 4 for this week and we were confused by sentence 4. In particular we were confused by the translation ...the river was immediately sent into the forest...' The verb in this sentence is 'missa est' which I am assuming is in the passive indicative perfect system. The FF text would translate this as 'has been sent', whereas the Henle text translates this as 'was sent'. Is there a discrepancy between how this verb is translated between the two texts?

    My second question pertains to sentence 3 on the same sheet. The word 'peterent' is translated as 'to seek'. Why is peterent not written as petere?
    Sentence #4 is a good example of how Latin is more precise than English when it comes to tenses. Technically, the perfect passive should be translated with "have/has been" but in English, "was" often sounds better. This is actually taught in the Forms as well, in Lesson 4 of Third Form Latin, and it is mentioned again in the Fourth Form Latin Workbook's Translation Checklist (p. 4, #7).

    In #3, peterent is the verb in an a purpose clause introduced by ut. The verb is in the imperfect tense because the main verb (miserunt) is in a secondary tense, the perfect. This purpose clause can be translated
    • in order that they may seek help
    • so that they may seek help
    • in order to seek help
    • to seek help

    This last translation uses an English infinitive, but Latin does not use infinitives to express purpose. Instead, Latin uses one of the purpose clause constructions you have learned.

    HTH, and if you have any further questions, please let me know!

    P.S. I've edited the thread title to include the program name for the sake of any future users who browse the forum.
    Michael
    Memoria Press

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      #3
      Re: Lesson 10 - worksheet 4 (Fourth Form Latin)

      Thank you and sorry for not putting the title in the post. I realize it may have been led to some confusion.

      I am sorry also to pester you with questions, but there are so many 'moving parts' by FF that I have a difficult time trying to find the chapter and/or page which references the questions that she has. In any case, your answers help immensely.
      Catherine

      Dd - 12 - full core 7A
      Dd - 10 - full core 5A

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Lesson 10 - worksheet 4 (Fourth Form Latin)

        Originally posted by Aquila View Post
        Thank you and sorry for not putting the title in the post. I realize it may have been led to some confusion.

        I am sorry also to pester you with questions, but there are so many 'moving parts' by FF that I have a difficult time trying to find the chapter and/or page which references the questions that she has. In any case, your answers help immensely.
        No problem! We're happy to help
        Michael
        Memoria Press

        Comment

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