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Elementary Greek Three - lesson 6.3 (and a few latin questions)

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    Elementary Greek Three - lesson 6.3 (and a few latin questions)

    We seem to be having a problem with prepositions, particularly in the third and last sentence in this lesson.

    Sentence three translated as - The letter is in the house. 'in the house' in Greek is written in the dative and not the accusative. Why is this so?
    The last sentence is translated as - The hope is in the faithful word of God. 'in the faithful word' is written in the dative and not the accusative. Why is this the case? (This is a funny play on words, as my daughter pointed out)

    My Latin question:

    Lesson 10 worksheet three question 17 - How are we to know that the word 'those' should be included in the translation?

    Lesson 10 worksheet three question 20. The sentence is translated as 'Caesar held the power for which he was eager.' the latin text reads Caesar imperium cujus cupidus erat obtinuit. Why is cujus in the genitive?

    Thank you.
    Catherine

    Dd - 12 - full core 7A
    Dd - 10 - full core 5A

    #2
    Re: Elementary Greek Three - lesson 6.3 (and a few latin questions)

    Originally posted by Aquila View Post
    We seem to be having a problem with prepositions, particularly in the third and last sentence in this lesson.

    Sentence three translated as - The letter is in the house. 'in the house' in Greek is written in the dative and not the accusative. Why is this so?
    The last sentence is translated as - The hope is in the faithful word of God. 'in the faithful word' is written in the dative and not the accusative. Why is this the case? (This is a funny play on words, as my daughter pointed out)

    My Latin question:

    Lesson 10 worksheet three question 17 - How are we to know that the word 'those' should be included in the translation?

    Lesson 10 worksheet three question 20. The sentence is translated as 'Caesar held the power for which he was eager.' the latin text reads Caesar imperium cujus cupidus erat obtinuit. Why is cujus in the genitive?

    Thank you.
    Good afternoon,

    Per our resident Greek expert: "The house" and "the faithful word" are both objects of the preposition ἐν, which takes the dative case. See Day 3 of Lesson 4 in the text for a review of prepositions.

    In #17, the word "those" translates the understood antecedent of the relative pronoun. You can see an example of this under the 4th bullet of p. 33 in Fourth Form Latin and on the bottom of p. 247 in the Henle text.

    In #20, the adjective "cupidus" governs an object in the genitive. This was taught back in Third Form Latin, Lesson 12 and reviewed in Fourth Form Latin, Lesson 3.

    Do theses answers help?
    Michael
    Memoria Press

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